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NMM Question


Vil-hatarn
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Okay, I know the basic idea behind NMM (at least, I think I do). Now, I want to know if this assumption is correct- basically, you just highlight edges more than raised surfaces. I know this is grossly oversimplifying it, but I think from what I've seen that it is a good basic rule to start learning it from. I want to do my army in NMM, due to the massive amount of silver I use, but I need to figure it out now, before I do any more units. I've gotten guides, but they really don't help me much.

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Good NMM is much more than highlighting the riased parts. Good NMM takes into account the light source's position and how the light would reflect from the given object. Good NMM takes in many considerations, but the two key factors outside of lightsource are contrast and the shape of the object being painted.

 

I can't do quality NMM, I try it on 80% of my minis, but if I am not copying the highlights/reflections and shadows from someone elses interpretation of the same piece, I am at a complete loss. I have no eye for it yet, but I figure I won't develope it without practice.

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NMM can be a royal P.I.A.

I get frustrated with it almost every figure....

 

One thing that I learned (sorta) at RAC was that when doing like a sword.or axe..

You want the darkest next to the lightest color...

 

ie... the tip of the sword (lightest) should blend down to darker of the blade and towards the inside if the light's comming from "the sky" but the blood groove should be your darkest color with a very fine line of a very light or white running along it to make it emphasized then the opposite side of the blood groove should go into the medium color to light but not the lightest, and again at the bottom of the base of the sword which again would pick up more light from the ground and "sky"reflections.....The back side of the figure is done in reverse of the front.

 

One thing that also helps me also with reflections of lightest to darkest areas.. is take a picture of the bare metal figure before you prime it with a light pointed only from the direction of where you want your light scorce to come from.. that'll show where the reflections should be and if you adjust the picture to B/W in your photo program, you'll have your silver recipe as well...Well a general idea anyway..

 

I read somewhere some painters keep a piece of silverware/ sword shaped letter opener on their paint areas.. to watch the reflections from that, for when the light moves, I haven't tried this one tho.I'm thinking about it..

 

I'm not that great at NMM yet, but I keep trying and that's the most important part. It's getting better though slowly...For you, each unit will get better by the time your armys done you'll probably have it down pat ::D:

 

G'luck and remember this is susposed to be fun...

 

EDITED: for stupid spelling misteaks ::P:

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Heh. The tutorial I did is actually Learn-to-Paint Kit 3, NMM. ::): Put simply, however:

 

1) Your light source is usually coming from above. Thus, the parts of, say, a sword blade that would receive the strongest (i.e. pure white) highlight would be the very top edge and the part that sticks out toward the viewer and thus catches the light (usually the center of the blade where it peaks and then angles back down and in).

 

2) Directly below (away from the light source) your brightest highlights will be a very thin line of your darkest shadow, usually black or very dark grey. As stated above, high contrast--your brightest next to your darkest--is one of the keys to NMM.

 

3) On the underside of the object or the side that is closest to the ground, you will find another highlight. This will sound weird, but remember that the environment around the figure is reflecting light back up at it, and thus the underside of a blade will be lighter even though it's away from the "sun". ::):

 

That was extremely simplified; if you'd like a much better write-up, plus tons of pictures and examples applying this to curved, flat, angled, and round objects, get a hold of Paint Kit 3. :;): Or wait months and months for the new painting book to come out. ::D: But remember the above when you're looking at examples online and maybe that will help it click for you.

 

--Anne ::):

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how about some helpful hints for doing NMM Blues?...

 

ive ordered a CAV mini that im thinking of either doing NMM gree or NMM blue...

 

kind of a chromish sort of color.... this is actually the first time ive thought of a color scheme BEFORE the mini has even come in yet... so im stoked

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Looking at silver items(like silverware) won't help you as much unless you're going for chrome. Best thing as someone mentioned is to look at other people's work. Also look at some 2-d art. The same concepts apply to both. Then copy what you like.

 

Written tutorials are always handy to have around.

 

Also don't get hung up too much on blending if you're painting armies (though you should practice it as often as you can if you want to get better). It'll take you eons to finish the army otherwise. Around 5 layers is plenty of blending for army models (depending on the surface) if you ever want to get done.

 

However here is another thing I'll recommend. First focus on some single models (maybe some leaders) to get the technique and your recipes down. Then it'll be easier to apply it to the rest. I'm currently working on two armies, and not using metallics. So I have a little experience in how it goes. Make sure you have a bag of patience with you, and get refills as often as you need them ^_^

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I'm also trying to do some NMM painting, but I too am having a problem trying to get the right shading, coloring and such.

I only have a few old mini's left too keep practicing before I head off to do the one that I want in NMM. If I can't get it, well then its back to the 'ol MM painting style.

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any good art book about painting metal provide alot of help it took me a while to wrap the idea of painting like i would on canvas on a mini, this site has lot of the same info you would find in said books as well as examples of doing blue red and a few other colored nmm s

 

http://elfwood.lysator.liu.se/farp/metal2/Reflective1.htm

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Reaper has it's own Painting Kit for this subject. Two figures, two brushes and nine paints with insturctions that are a little more detailed than the previous two-boxed sets.

 

Nice thing about it though, well, outside of the price, is that all the paitns you need to cover the figures, are included so you don't have to have any outside paints.

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