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CAV Choice Help


Grizz
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I bought a Rulebook and 4 cav's three of which don't have cards in the book. I was wondering about these other three that I bought. I am curious about the Centorion, Butcher and the Katana.

 

I am also curious about painting the minis. Do u think it is easier to paint them assembled or in pieces? What paints are the best to use? And what size brushes?

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The Centurion and Butcher CAV's are in the JOR2, and the Katana is in JOR1. Search around this CAV forum and you'll find a link for the FREE CAV army builder that some of the demo team created. It's AWESOME!!!

 

Personally I assemble THEN paint and find it to be much easier than the reverse. There's no problem reaching tough areas, and frankly anything that would be tough is not going to get viewed anyways.

 

Use acrylic paints... obviously Reaper paints are wonderful. I don't know brush sizes, but I guess I use standard mix of them. Perhaps ask about brushes in the craft corner threads... someone there would know better.

 

Good luck.

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One addendum to what Spartan said about being able to find anything you need to know from CAV-RC.

 

That's certainly true, from a game stats point of view, but if you want the history of the units and some info about what type of force would be fielding them, the JoR's are a must.

 

As far as your painting questions, I also always say that for models which will see tabletop use you should assemble them first, then paint them. The bond of superglue to metal is far stronger than the bond of superglue to paint to metal. Your models will live longer this way. Acrylic paints are the way to go, and you're going to want at least two different brushes -- a larger one to get the basecoats on easily and a fine detail brush for darklining, contrast panels, highlighting and the like.

 

And, since no one else seems to have said it, Welcome to the Boards and to CAV. I think you'll enjoy your time spent in both.

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I agree its usually easier to assemble, then paint.

 

Be sure to give the model a quick coat of primer before you start painting. This gives the paint something to bind onto and makes your paint job more durable and much easier to apply.

 

When you do have them painted give them a shot of clear overcoat such as Testors Dullcote.

 

This will help protect them from gaming use. Nothing more frustrating than watching your paint job wear off during heavy use. ::o:

 

Don't know your painting level you may know all this already but if you don't these are essential to a good long lasting paint job. ::D:

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Well, I am gonna have to be the one to disagree on the assemble and paint.

 

Battletech minis are good for assemble and then paint. But, most CAV minis are very tight fitting such that it is really difficult to get the brush in the nooks and crannies.

 

Admittedly, the Butcher you mentioned could be assembeled and painted cause it holds it arms out a little wider. But, the others hold their arms in close and will give you fits.

 

My reccomendation is to look at how the arms hang before making your decision. For most of my CAVs, I have assmebled the upper torso and based the lower torso, but held off on actually connecting the two til after painting.

 

There are even a few that keep their arms in so tight that I had to wait for any assembly til after painting.

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Ya as a rule of thumb i test fit everything first and then assemble the sections i think i can paint easily and then paint the rest in parts. for spray painting i highly recommend hunting down hangers with the clamps attached like they use for womans skirts. you can clip weapons spurs to them and even some cav torsos and it makes it much easier to spray paint them.

 

Mad Pat

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Up till this point I have been priming and basecoating then assembling and painting in details like camo, cockpits, weapon details. That way I could make sure everything had at least the right base color but have the added ease of handling the intact model (plus its a lot easier to flesh out paint patterns whenyou can see it all at once).

 

My girlfriend got me a airbrush for christmas though, so I'm going to see how just assembling right off the bat works for me now... Unfortunately the only warm days I had to work with it so far were consumed with learning how to use the airbrush.

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One of the first things you need to do is get yourself the materials you'll need to build painting 'handles', that'll make your job a lot easier. 35mm film tubes (the black plastic ones) or old prescription drug bottles make excellent handles. Use some sticky tack (the stuff you used to use to hang posters on your bedroom wall with) to attach the mini's base to the top of the tube/bottle. Now you can hold the mini and paint it, without ever touching the mini with your fingers.

 

This gets kinda hard with some of the larger models. You may want to try letting the sticky tack cure overnight to see if it'll hold then.

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