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Testors dullcoat


mateybob
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Ive just noticed today that testors dullcoat has the following message on the can: "This product contains a chemical known in the state of California to cause birth defects and other reproductive harm." can anyone shed some light on that? :blink: I find it somewhat disturbing that it says KNOWN TO CAUSE as oposed to something like MAY CAUSE...

What does this message really mean? Im going to suffer from reproductive problems by breathing in the fumes? or by just touching a model thats been dullcoated? or are my testicles going to fall of just by standing within a 10 meter radius of the can? :unsure:

 

Any info appreciated! especially from trained medical practitioners ^_^

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My understanding is that CA has very strict guidlines for testing of all chemical products. So if they test 10,000 people who used this product and 1 of them has a birth defect then its gotta be that chemical. its basically like the side effects of your medications ie.. tylenol's side effects, headache, fever, nausea,etcc. so i wouldnt worry to much about it unless your pregnant and not using proper breathing equipment.

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As long as you don't use it in California, then you have nothing to worry about ::P:

 

If you follow the instructions (i.e. use in a well ventillated area), you should have absolutely no problems.

 

There are certain components to the solvent mixture in spray paints which are on the California list (such as toluene), however, the exposure level from spraying a model in a well ventillated area is too low to be harmful. Spraying the model in an unventillated room, and breathing in all the fumes is not such a good idea. Spraying a large amount of the DullCote directly on your skin or breathing the fumes from the entire can in one day could get you to a more hazardous exposure.

 

I'm not sure of the origins of the phrase, but it's appropriate here "It's the dose that makes the poison"

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... and not using proper breathing equipment.

Breathing equipment? :huh:

If you are going to spray DullCote repeatedly, in an unventilated area, and stay there for hours at a time, then you should get a respirator with an organic vapors removal cartridge.

 

If you are going to spray for 30-60 seconds at a time, outside, twice a day, then you don't need one. Just don't spray into the wind.

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There is a list of metals and metal compounds, including certain dyes and solvents that are required to have that warning if they are of respirable size, so the product can be sold in CA. Quantity and amount of exposure are what they don't talk about on those warnings. For most substances on that list as long as there is no repeated and extended exposure, you should be safe. I would keep babies and small children away from the area you spray though, while you're spraying.

 

The human body is amazingly capable of purging most poisons given enough time. Of course there are certain chemicals that will do permanent harm with even the smallest exposure, such as mercury fumes, radioactive elements (when unstable), certain biochemical gaseous poisons of ill repute, etc.

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I write Operator's Manuals for a power equipment manufacturer. As a result, I am very familliar with those warnings. They come from California Proposition 65. You will find versions of them for lead, gasoline, deisel fuel, batteries, etc... The state of California created a long list of harmful chemicals and made a ruling that any product containing a chemical on the list must also contain a warning about it. The warnings use very specific text, such as:

 

WARNING: The power cord on this product contains lead, a chemical known to the

State of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm. Wash hands

after handling.

 

Now, I applaud CA for trying to protect its citizens from hazardous chemicals, but because the proposition only specifies presence and not quantity or likelyhood of exposure it is an over effective law. Also, CA has bounty hunter laws that allow lawyers to search out companies and people breaking things like Prop 65 and sue them in court. The bounty hunter then gets a share of the fines charged to the company.

 

So what you have in CA is a bunch of lawyers looking for things with chemicals in them, no matter how trace, and bringing companies to trial. The warning I have listed above was added to our electrical products after a competitor got sued for using power cords with lead in them and not warning about it. The lead in the power cords is trace, a by-product of the manufacturing process; however, the law only looks at presence of the chemical and nothing else. The company lost the case and had to pay fines, even though one would have to EAT several hunderd feet of power cord before consuming enough lead to do anything to you.

 

Because of the problems with this law, it is even more difficult for consumers to know if the product they use is dangerous or not, because almost everything has something in it. Every year more and more products are having the CA warnings added, even though there is little danger. All these warnings do is dillute the message and make customers either nervous about everything, or ignore the dangers when there is a real threat. In our manuals, we put the CA warnings followed by the real warnings that actually describe the threat level and let the customer know how to use our products without being harmed. That way customers can make informed decisions.

 

Read your Operator's Manuals! ::D:

 

TS

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Also, CA has bounty hunter laws that allow lawyers to search out companies and people breaking things like Prop 65 and sue them in court. The bounty hunter then gets a share of the fines charged to the company.

:huh:

 

I'm in the wrong profession.

 

Before I derail this topic...

 

With so much emphasis these days into things like "huffing," it is pretty much a requirement with all states to have some sort of warning on spray paints/sealers.

 

Since I use brush-on primer, I'm not so worried. I do not, however, drill, sand, buff, file, Dremel, or remove mold/flash lines from minis while around my son, and when I have worked on them, my hands are scrubbed before I touch him. I should also start using a mask (even those simple allergy mask things you get at the drug store should work) so I don't inhale the metal dust. As it is I've always joked about having multi-colored lungs due to breathing in pastel dust. I know if I blow my nose after working in pastels, it is multi-colored. :upside:

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I figure with the 10 years of smoking up to 3 packs per day, often unfiltered, from 14-24, a little chance exposure to aerosol when I am spraying outdoors and holding my breath is not going to do much more harm. That being said. If I was working indoors, and I have in the past, I like to make sure I have some form of filtration just to be on the safe side. I'd be more worried about anoxia than anything else though.

 

I'd also be more worried if I was female, where my reproductive cells are premade and do not get restocked, and therefore more at risk from even passing exposure.

 

I have to agree, if I saw a warning label on everything, I would probably start ignoring them. Oh wait, I usually do that. ::D: I'm still too young (and therefore believe invulnerable) to become hypervigilant about something like that. Though 100 feet of industrial electric cord. I'd be more worried about the rubber and potential intestinal blockage than I would from lead poisoning.

Hey Cletus, check out this ginormous roll of lic'rish!!!

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I use Mr. Hobby Flat-Matt Topcoat, and it doesn't have a warning on it like that.

 

That's probably because you do not live in the US. The US, California, Canada, EU, Australlia, etc... all have different laws about package labeling. Companies are also required to do different things based on where the product is shipped. Many companies have different versions of the same product to meet the laws of the area where it is sold.

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Yeh, it's kinda wierd. Companies are always criticised for not having warnings that are "up to U.S. standards".

 

US Standards! :lol:

 

Sorry, but that is funny. The EU has far more stringent controls on most things than the US. We usually have to make special guards and such for going over seas that are simply not required or seen as unnecessary in the US. For instance, the US has very little in the way of noise and vibration control, whereas the EU is very strict.

 

The only thing we tend to be more strict on is FDA issues such as drugs (and even that is highly debateable, especially with the new standards of the EU).

 

TS

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