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Glaze vs Ink vs Clear


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  • Reaper User

1) Clear Brights are regular paint consistancy; inks are formulated to be an extremely watery consistancy to give you some amount of transparency right out of the bottle; "glaze" refers to a paint or ink which has been thinned so much that it only slightly tints the surface you apply it over; it's used most often to hide visible gradations in layering, or to intensity colors (see below).

 

2) a. Clear Brights are not truly transparent, just close. They are limited by the pigments they use; for example, the blue, green, and yellow are extremely transparent because the raw pigments used for them are transparent. The red, however, has some body to it, because red pigment does have some opacity.

b. Inks are truly transparent, because they use dyes for coloration, rather than the pigments used in acrylic and other paints. This is also why colored inks tend to "bleed" their color through paint which you apply over them--the dyes are sometimes mutable even after drying and Dullcote. :P

c. Glazes retain some opacity if they are watered-down paint, and are transparent if you use watered-down ink. Ink glazes are typically used for intensifying colors, as the dyes are very bright; paint glazes are a little more opaque so tend to hide rough layering better--they better "cloud" the issues, if you will. ::D:

 

3) Though all of the above are water-based, most inks have lacquers in them as binding agents, which means that they are not non-toxic. This is what makes them dry shiny. Reaper Inks are not made from the same stuff as artists' inks, so they don't have lacquers, and are non-toxic, but they are also not truly transparent.

 

That answer your question? ::):

 

--Anne

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I learned quite a bit about the chemistry of mini-painting from just experimenting in my freelance days and asking a lot of questions and looking up of stuff on the internet, but since coming to Reaper and working with Al and our paint suppliers to design the Master Paints I have learned TONS more. So I mostly blame Reaper for all that hard drive space in my brain being taken up! ::D:

 

I've got to say that it never hurts in this hobby to have an inquisitive mind. All of this stuff is out there to learn and all it takes is a bit of time, reading, and experimentation. The best painters I know are inquisitive; they don't want to just know how to layer, they go on to test and push themselves, to learn *why* materials act in a certain way and to find their own best way to do things. So, while I may hand out all this info when you guys ask on the boards, trust me--it is far better for you to explore some or all of this on your own, too, and to make your own discoveries, because I don't know everything and my path will not always be the right path for you! ::):

 

--Anne

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That's a hard one.

 

Truth is, as you gain more experience, there is this completely subconcious process that makes you reach for the pot of glaze instead of the ink pot for an specific effect. It's just something that you do after a while.

 

Based solely on their physical properties and personal tastes, glazes and transparencies go with real metallics to convey tinted alloys, although glazes on their own, I use to even out some gradient work that would not come out quite right without it.

 

Inks, I use mostly to deepen and thin regular paints, sometimes instead of water, but limited mostly to some detailing, and not block painting. The ink also works great for darklining, properly thinned, and to add shading on heavy-textured surfaces. I do not use it to shade flat surfaces because I don't like the effect, but your mileage may vary.

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  • Reaper User

d. All of the above

 

Clear Brights are used to intensify color or hide gradiants; you can use them to shade if you wish, but they can only shade lighter colors, because they're not dark paints (with the exception of the purple, which is a little darker). Glazes are used to tint, not shade. Applying a dark, localized glaze in an effort to shade would essentially result in very very subtle layering--using the paint a little stronger would result in regular layering, with much less hair-pulling. Inks make great shading devices if you're talking about the dark colors--brown ink, for example, is a great all-purpose shader.

 

I think you might be getting a little confused on terminology, since the three things you're bringing up are very differnent from each other--two are materials but one is a technique which can be used for either paint or ink, your choice. When it comes down to it, your best bet on this one is going to be to experiment yourself.

 

General guidelines purely limited to myself: for high-quality paintjobs, don't use ink. Ink is a quick-and-dirty time-saver. It's unreliable when sealed in that it tends to bleed, and it's shiny so you have to fight that with several layers of matte sealer. If you want intense colors, either mix Clear Brights with your paint or use them as glazes. If you are painting a model in subtle or darker tones, you wouldn't use Clear Brights. Most paint glazes are primarily used to minimize gradiant lines from imperfect layering.

 

Hope that helps.

 

--Anne

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Could someone tell me what the difference would be in painting though?

 

When would you use what?

 

For example, creating shadows on a cape. Clear, ink or glaze?

shadows on a cape... like in the crevices?

 

 

well, i do weird things personally, so id just use my watered down pure black, its pretty darn thin..

 

its about 1 drop black to about almost a half bottle of water (MSP bottle size) i keep it thinned that way on purpose... in effect its a glaze, because if i use it to wash over a surface, you can still see the underlying color, but it darkens it..

 

for instance if i were to have a red cape, id use a dark red for the crevices, but id probably add the thinned black over that to give an even dark area

 

for instance, the red cape on Arrius the black here http://www.deviantart.com/view/17709901/

 

also, on the front, his armor was bolt gun metal (or whatever its called), its a dark silver GW color, but i added the thinned black over that, because hes an undead warrior, he should look dirty or aged..

http://www.deviantart.com/view/17709910/

 

 

hope that helps some

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So in terms of tint, you'd use the clear? That would make the figure, for example, one primed in black, lighter?

 

Like red clear over a blood red space marine primed black?

Using Clear Red over the top of a warrior primed black and then painted with Blood Red wouldn't make the red necessarily lighter, but it would probably make the Blood Red brighter, i.e. more intense. Unless you're using GW Blood Red in which case it's already screaming-eyeball-bright red, and a glaze of Clear Red in that case will just make something you have to wear sunglasses to look at safely. ::D: UNLESS you're using GW Blood Red right over the black primer, in which case paint gods help you, you really need to put a darker red undercoat under that--GW Blood Red doesn't cover worth anything! ::D:

 

--Anne, Who Is Clearly Loopy And Needs To Go Home Now

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You said you were planning an article on liners, could we get one on the Clears as well? It seems like they are kind of link inks, but not really. (forgive me if I am wrong, I'm having a hard time getting a handle on what they are) So an article would be awesome, and allow us to get the most out of them.

 

Terry, who loves Loopy Anne's last posts of the day

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