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Glaze vs Ink vs Clear


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So it sounds like the inks continue to be used for shading and clears for making things 'brighter' as opposed to lighter.

Yes, but you can use colored inks in the same way you use thinned Clear Brights to intensify color.

 

--Anne

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Ok, I'm going to take a shot at this, mostly to see if I've got this right. I'm sort of geeky and gain great pleasure in understading how stuff works.

 

So, the Clear Red is a paint. Paint consists of (at least) two parts: the medium, which is the liquidy part, and the pigment which is a fine particulate solid that is the colored part.

 

The issue is that with some colors (like red, blue and yellow) the nature of the pigment causes the the paint to be somewhat translucent if you use a clear medium. This can be fixed if you use a medium that has color of its own, but this has the effect of 'muting' the pigment. So, you can either get a muted color that covers well, or a 'bright' one that is translucent.

 

The Clears are the 'problem' pigments with a clear medium.

 

Inks are colored liquids. That is, they do not have any pigment in them. They color stuff by 'staining' it.

 

Glazing is the technique of applying translucent color to a mini for a variety of effects (changing the tint of an area, shading, highlighting). Inks and Clears are good for this technique because they are already somewhat translucent, but anything will do if sufficiently thinned.

 

Is that more or less right?

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  • Reaper User
I'm sure this is posted elsewhere, but what is the timeline for when the clears are going to come out?

 

To lazy to keep looking after more than one search through the forums,

Jabber

Clears are pumped as of right now and are supposed to ship at the end of this week, along with the new brush-on primer, the new Matte sealer, the Reaper Flow Improver, the Golden (Asian) Skintones, and the six shiny new colored metallics. Enjoy!! ::D:

 

--Anne :)

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Inks are colored liquids. That is, they do not have any pigment in them. They color stuff by 'staining' it.

Pigments and dyes are very, very similar. The big difference is that pigments are color particles which are smaller than a micron (so not detectable as particulate to the human eye), but which are non-soluble. Pigment particles will not dissolve when added to water (or paint!). They have varying particle size (which affects their coverage) and rates of dispersal (how strong they are in solution) depending on whether they are organic or inorganic. Inorganic pigments tend to have higher dispersal rates--a little of them goes a long way in a mix--but not always. Examples of this: Pthalocyanine Green and Pthalocyanine Blue are inorganics with incredibly small particle sizes, which gives them a high dispersion rate (i.e. a little blue overpowers the same amount of most other pigments) but poor coverage (you can see right through 'em!). Titanium White has a large particle size, which gives it good coverage, and is still an inorganic, so you need to use 1.3 times (roughly) the amount of black to mix with white when achieving a 50% neutral grey. Raw Umber is an organic brown pigment with a smaller particle size; it doesn't cover all that well, and it takes a ton of it added to a paint mix to affect the color. You see? ::):

 

Dyes are color particles of varying sizes which *will* dissolve when added to a solvent. They are able to penetrate permeable surfaces and will thus "bleed" into/onto/through surrounding colors, materials, or components.

 

Inks may be made with either or both of the above. Printers' inks are usually pigments; artists' inks are usually dyes.

 

Hope that helps!

 

--Paint-chemist Anne

p.s. otherwise you're pretty much on, and Inks do stain things; but they do have color in them as well. :)

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Dyes are color particles of varying sizes which *will* dissolve when added to a solvent.  They are able to penetrate permeable surfaces and will thus "bleed" into/onto/through surrounding colors, materials, or components.

And just to stir/confuse the soup a little more, the term "dye" is often commonly used to refer to the combination of said said color particles in a dissolved state in the solvent.

 

In my house, dyes are usually used for leather, and generally have an unpleasantly toxic base, particularly the petroleum-based black.

 

(for me, dyes are the things that soak into my skin and leave me speckled for 2+ days, everything washes off or otherwise disappears within 24 hours...)

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