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I have been told that if I do "black lining" on my minis that they will look a lot better. Now I just did the nymph and used brown as a wash over the whole figure after doing base coats but made sure I left a slight line of brown around any detail that was visible. Is this what "black lining" is? How does one achieve the nice black lines without screwing up a figure?

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I'm not an expert, but I'll give you the short answer.

Black lining is just leaving a small line where two materials meet, say some armor and an arm. It helps those two materials to stick out. You can either black line, and then paint the areas normally, or you can paint everything and then line afterwards. It's a matter of personal choice. There are many discussions and tutorials on the net about lining, although I have none right now.

 

And as a final note, it's called black lining, but you don't actually have to use black. Here is a discussion on that subject.

Colors for darklining

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Ah, that makes sense. The game store I shop at, the owner told me that some artists used Pigma pens or India Ink pens to line but that didn't seem to be the best idea.

 

Underpainting is what I did on the nymph I just finished and she turned out great! As soon as I get a camera I am going to post the picture see what everyone thinks.

 

Thanks

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Thanks for that twjolson. I knew that black lining didn't mean using just black for lining. I actually tried to get the effect of lining on a nymph I just completed last week and I think I did it alright. I just wanted to see if there was a better way of doing it.

 

The way I did it was I painted all of the base colors on and then washed the whole figure in the same color wash and then did my second coat of base colors and then my detailing. She came out very well but like I said I wanted to see if there was a better way of doing it.

 

thanks for the link too. It seems this is a topic that people have many different opinions and techniques for.

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I absolutely hate to say so (used to using black for lining as I am), but I love the new Reaper Brown liner. It's a very very dark brown (almost black). I've only used it on one mini so far, but I think I might actually used it instead of black from now on....

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I absolutely hate to say so (used to using black for lining as I am), but I love the new Reaper Brown liner. It's a very very dark brown (almost black). I've only used it on one mini so far, but I think I might actually used it instead of black from now on....

Join us, Inge! JOIN US!!!!

 

(insert maniacle laughter here)

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Thanks for that twjolson. I knew that black lining didn't mean using just black for lining. I actually tried to get the effect of lining on a nymph I just completed last week and I think I did it alright. I just wanted to see if there was a better way of doing it.

 

The way I did it was I painted all of the base colors on and then washed the whole figure in the same color wash and then did my second coat of base colors and then my detailing. She came out very well but like I said I wanted to see if there was a better way of doing it.

 

thanks for the link too. It seems this is a topic that people have many different opinions and techniques for.

Do you mean you wash the "WHOLE" mini, or just the areas you want blacklined?

When I care enough to do this kind of job, I take a wash of black and selectively wash where blacklining should go. I don't know if others do this, but I think it helps give a transistion between the black and the regular color, it won't create a hard line of black.

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a 5/0 Frosh!! u can line with THAT!!!??? I gotta use a 10/0 Liner since its got the longer brush length. When I darkline I usually do so after the base coat. but sometimes I forget and have to go back in after all the highlights have been added. IMHO i think the reason to darkline is to have the stark contrast between the two surfaces. makes things stand out. Plus I like to actually Line the piece not just do the wash, with the wash you end up darkening the area around it to much for my likes.

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twjolson yes I meant the WHOLE mini. On one of the painting FAQ's I was reading it said to dilute the wash so it's almost completely transluscent and wash the WHOLE mini. I only do this after my base coat and this way all of the colors are dulled down a bit so when I do my second coat I get an even tone to all of the colors then I go back and highlight. Washing the WHOLE mini has worked on the occasions I have done this. It doesn't darken the paint job so much that it is ruined it adds a little bit of shadow to areas though and I also don't have to worry about messing up my lines, because I washed the WHOLE mini. It may be a less precise way of lining my paint job but it's not difficult as just trying to get your line where you want it.

 

It gives you more of a chance to fix mistakes that were made without botching the entire paint job as well. By washing the entire mini you can sometimes cover up colors that got where they weren't supposed to be.

 

Hey, the approach works for me. Depending on what colors I am working with though I will use either brown or black but not both on a figure. This worked on my nymph and she turned out great!

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I took a paint class with Marike at Reapercon and she suggested (which I've been using since) painting one item (she started with a cloak) all the way up to highlights, then lining that part so you can get the lining sloppy on the other parts which will be cleaned up later when that is painted. For example-on Reapercon Sophie, I painted her flesh all the way to where I was happy with it, then lined. After lining, I painted her chaps, "shirt", etc. With the smaller details on these pieces, I then lined before painting the details. It looks quite nice and I'm very happy with it. Hope that helps!

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I took a paint class with Marike at Reapercon and she suggested (which I've been using since) painting one item (she started with a cloak) all the way up to highlights, then lining that part so you can get the lining sloppy on the other parts which will be cleaned up later when that is painted.

That's the way I do it too.

 

It's nice because it lets you be messy with your basecoat on some of the large areas (like the skin) which makes it easier to get a good, smooth coverage.

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