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Drill bit question


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Here is the situation. I am going to make place card holders for my wedding reception out of some minis, but I would like to buy a drill bit that will last through almost a hundred drills without getting messed up, but be small enough to sink a dress makers pin in each mini's head. Are any drill bits out their any better than any others? or should I just buy a whole mess of one size, and just throw them away when they git bad?

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Well I would take a peek at what Micromark offers. They have some nice bits.

 

www.micromark.com

 

That being said, I will add here though that if I were going to be doing this, I would just buy a package of all the same sized bits and when one broke or wore out I would change to a new one. If you don't use them all, then you have extra bits to use for drilling for conversions.

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when dealing with drill bits that small, you will be better off with a bunch of bits the same size rather than trying to find a single super-bit (it one even exists). The hardness required for a good drill bit makes the small diameter bits very brittle.

 

Is it possible to drill 100 holes with the same bit without it breaking - yes, but unlikely.

 

if you go to a good hobby or model railroad shop, the small number-size bits are typically about $1 each

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Lawson Products drill bits are the best if you can get ahold of them, they work well for stainless steel so anything that a mini is made out of wont faze them. After that Fastenal makes a decent bit, not quite as lasting as a Lawson bit, but decent.

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I got Dracos a bunch of little-bitty bits for pinning here, less than $1/each (pre-shipping):

Shore International - Twist Drill Bits Page

 

I forget what size I got to use with straight pins, and they're currently on walkabout. 72, maybe?

 

When I called and asked about the different brands, the person I talked to said he didn't feel that there was much difference between the Mascot and European, it was mostly a personal preference thing. I don't think I asked about the Dormer, as they worked out to about the same price as what we were paying at the local model shop.

 

looking at the ordering information page, they base their shipping/handling charge on the shipping cost, (when I ordered Dracos' bits, I also ordered another item that faaar outweighed them). And I see that they also have a $25 minimum order. OTOH, they have lots of cool goodies...

 

**EDIT: Fixed link**

Edited by ladystorm
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The biggest trick I've found with pinning and bits lasting is what the mini is made out of... Alot of the older/cheaper mini's that I've got are made out of a pewter that simply stinks... usually it melts from the heat of the bit and gunks up the drill... then I risk getting it stuck and/or snapping it...

 

But the other advice: Buy a few of the same type is also good advice as well... I think I but a #60 @ $2.00 USD a pop at a local ACE hardware (they have a generic brand that they sell)...

 

Rgds,

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I routinely will dip the tip of my drill bit into a bit of WD-40 if I am planning on doing a lot of heavy drilling. It helps reduce friction, and therefore reduces heat. This will prevent the pewter from melting before it is removed from hole. Back your drill out frequently to help remove the debris. This will also help prevent the debris from heating, melting and causing the bit to bind and then snap. I have only started using my third drill bit in the nearly 3 years I have been assembling miniatures now. I will pin almost EVERY joining point, and regularly pin my figures to their bases as well.

 

I had one bit snap because it bound. My 2nd bit is still usable, but it has dulled, so I really don't use it anymore.

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I keep a small amount of motor oil in a plastic shotglass on the table when using the dremel. It has helped dull bits cut like new and new bits stay that way for many uses.

 

Of couse you have to wash the holes you drill afterwards, but the effort is worth it.

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