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Pro Paint storage


Swanson
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Storing upside down doesn't always help. Mine were stored that way for a long time and still went bad. The yellows will be hit hardest.

 

Your best bet is to transfer them to the dropper bottles. Check each one, remove the film, and test the thickness/graininess. If it's very thick and grainy, retrieve the skull from inside and toss it. It's not saveable. Otherwise you might be able to add a little water and stir vigorously with a toothpick (or twelve) to revive the paint. Add additional bits of pewter (or some of the skulls if you have them) to help with the shaking.

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I've often wondered, would keeping paints in the refrigerator make them last longer?

 

Or how about keeping the bottles inside a sealed zip-lock bag, with most of the air squeezed out?

 

Anyone have any tricks like this to keep paint longer?

Limiting the exposure to air is the key, so yes, vacuum sealed zip lock bags would help, but would also be a pain.

 

Part of the problem is the design of the bottle though. The seal doesn't appear to completely keep out air, so they dry over time. Also, if you paint from the open bottle or bottle cap, the paint is exposed to air the whole time. Transfering paint from the bottle to a palettle, closing the bottle and then painting is better. Even when the lid is only open for a short time, a large surface area of paint in the bottle is exposed to air.

 

This is why dropper bottles work better. Good bottles seem to have a better seal again air. When the top is off, very little gets exposed to air. And, you squeeze a few drops out that you need and then put away the rest. Transferring Pro Paints to a dropper bottle will drastically increase their shelf life.

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I'm going to be putting my paints into storage soon. I was debating using a big vacuum-sealed bag, and then storing them in a cool, dry, dark place.

 

Of course, I'm storing them for 1+ years, which isn't the same thing I think you are worried about...

 

Peter

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I had mine in a closet for about 20 months and about eight were completely unsalvagable. Some are still useable but very thick and need thinning, and some seem to be okay. The yellows were the worst culprits. I had to toss most of them.

 

Strangely, out of the 15+ year old Testor PollyS paints I have (glass bottles and metal, screw-on lids) I've had only two go bad. The Testors are enamels, the PollyS are water soluable acrylic. There was some seperation, but overall with a lot of shaking/stirring, they're still good to go.

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