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Trouble with flock

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I have trouble flocking my bases.

 

All my minis are either on slot-a-base type bases or battle bases. I "paint" Elmer white glue on the base, dunk the mini in the flock, and that's where things go wrong.

 

First, the flock agglomerates everywhere BUT where there's glue. Second, when I shake it off, it all goes, even the little flock that was caugh in the glue. Third, when the glue dries, the flock falls off!

 

I read somewhere that I should thin the glue before putting it on the base, but this only managed to increase those problems. I'm pretty sure white glue is equivalent to PVA glue, but I'd liek confirmation, 'cause the GW stuff costs like 7 times what I have right now.

 

The flock I have is not specially made for minis, but for railroad hobbyists. It looks like green-colored sawdust (which is probably exactly what it is...).

 

Should I switch glue?

Is the flock I have adequate?

Should I modify my flocking method?

 

Your help would be greatly appreciated in this matter.

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The method I've been told for white glue is to thin it down, and actually mix flock into it, then paint/spatula that on. I'd say it looks fine for tabletop minis, but for display, eh, I'm not wild about it.

 

Try spreading superglue and then flocking it to that. When Anne Foerster visited Reaper a few weeks ago to paint, that was what she said she always uses for her static grass. I would think that it should work for flock/ballast as well.

 

I also like the look of uneven terrain. Spots with ballast opposed with spots of static grass looks better than a lush carpet beneath the feet. It seems to give a better sense of place for the figure.

 

Railroad hobbyist flock/ballast/static grass is just fine... they're miniatures too!

 

Hope some of this helps!

 

ReaperIvy

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What I do, *cough, cough*, is paint on the Elmers at "full" strength, dip it in flock, shake off the excess VERY lightly, then let it sit for, oh, maybe a half hour or so, until I'm sure the glue is relatively dry, and then repeat a number of times depending on how many different flock types I'm using. Just make sure you use enough glue on the base, you don't want it so thin you can see through it, but you also don't want it thick enough that it oozes about the base. Also, when you dip it the first time, let it sit in the flock for a few minutes before shaking it, and after shaking it and letting it sit for another few minutes, if there are bald spots dip it in the flock again. You may even have to add a bit more glue to the bald areas. Then don't mess with it until it is dry. Sometimes, especially with a coarser flock, the glue will get absorbed, and will not really be attached all that well, but then the glue hardens and everything knits together. Well, hope that helps.

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Thanks, Ivy!

 

I'll try the mix-n-slap on method. It'll take care of the no-flock-here syndrom the minis I did before have... where you can see the paintless base under the flocking...

 

Rule #6: paint the WHOLE base, not just the sides...

 

And since I use those minis for RPG, they don't need to be top notch! In fact, it's probably better since that rogue can of Coke is notorious for causing damage!

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Oh, and whatever you do, NEVER BUY GAMES WORKSHOP HOBBY SUPPLIES! They're way over priced, and usually of a lower quality than anything you could find at a good hobby or hardware store.

 

Well, good luck.  :)

 

(Had to add the smilie so I don't sound too angry...)

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I'm not really good at the whole flocking business either.  I haven't tried to add the uneven terrain, and basically all of my minis have a "lush carpet" beneath their feet.  What I do to create the lush carpet look is paint the base a color that resembles the flocking.  (A thick coat of paint.)  Before it has dried, I then dip the mini into the flock.  I only dip the base, not the entire mini.  The flock will stick to the wet paint and dry that way, then I spray on the finish.  Oh, I also keep my flocking material in a cheap 1" deep gladware sandwich keeper.  This makes it easier for me to dip only the base and not the whole mini.

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I use this method, first related to me by John M. Ford:

 

- paint the base with Elmer's Glue, undiluted.

- dip the base in some flock spread onto my flock container top (I use a little pint container from some wonton soup I bought)

- let it dry

- shake off the excess

- place the mini flock-deep in a 50/50 solution of Elmer's Glue and water. Let the flock get good and soaked (some will float off if you are using lichens, sand will just stay in place) and take it out. Allow it to dry for a few hours.

 

The flock will be more brittle (again, if lichen) but stay very well and be pretty solid. By brittle I mean if you press your thumb on it, it will break, but it will stay in place for a long time, even under heavy use. Heavy use being gamers using the #### minis every week while simultaneously using the word "Oops."

 

Sand and gravel under this treament tends to become very solid, almost like a concrete.

 

That works for me. One caveat is that I flock bases because I find it attractive, but I want my minis to be wargaming/RPGing playing pieces. This method might not work for static grass or a show-piece mini, but it works for the workhorses I am painting up for my games.

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Okay, I do it that way:

1. paint the base in brown (usually)

2. disperse  a rather liquid all-purpose-glue an the base

3. apply larger terrain objects (stones and sticks)

4. basic flock (black or brown)

5. put little blobs of glue where I want to apply special flock

6. apply special flock (static grass etc.)

 

This is primarily a FAST method of doing nice bases.

 

Please have a look at my gallery for various applications of that method:

http://www.teugen.de/gallerien/catlion.html

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I apply a dot of superglue, and smear it around the base with a wire loop.

 

Then I add flock.

 

The superglue dries fast, and allows me to rapidly detail a base.

 

Superglue - smear - add gravel - dot of superglue - add statid grass. Wonderful little grass clumps on a base.

 

-Daniel

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I have a hard time with static grass.  Any hints.  (Basically, I my static grass lays down nicely, but I don't know how to make it stick up and actually look like grass.)

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I have a hard time with static grass.  Any hints.  (Basically, I my static grass lays down nicely, but I don't know how to make it stick up and actually look like grass.)

Shake the bag or container before you apply it to charge it. Anne Foerster said that superglue seems to make it stand up more.

 

Good luck!

 

ReaperIvy

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The flock I have is not specially made for minis, but for railroad hobbyists. It looks like green-colored sawdust (which is probably exactly what it is...).

 

Should I switch glue?

Is the flock I have adequate?

Should I modify my flocking method?

I made the mistake of buying (Woodland Scenics, I believe) fine green flock for railroad hobbyists.  The problem was that the flock was too fine for the elmers glue (let alone for the watered down elmers).  It all would fall off the mini, no matter how many coats I tried to put on.  To remedy this, I had to go back and buy the COARSE flock.  

 

To get rid of all that old fine flock, I mixed it with elmers glue to form a green paste.  This paste can be used to "spackle"  recessed bases to fill them, make foliage (with effort) on improvised trees, and can be spread around larger (I used 4"-5") bases for terrain pieces that will see alot of play.  The paste dries fairly hard, and has a rather rough texture.

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Woodland Scenics Fine Flocks- Wow, now theres some work :;):

 

    Here is how I use this messy flock.

 

        1) Use white glue with playsand or ballast as a base.

            The sand and ballast are heavy enough to sink into

            the glue.

 

        2) When dry, paint whatever color floats your boat.

 

        3) I then pick the areas where I want to apply flock,

            static grass, or long grass and lightly paint white

            glue to the area, apply flock and let dry.

 

        4) Then, using WS Scenic Cement and an eye dropper

             I apply a drop to the flocked areas and once this

             dries you will have very little flock that falls off.

 

This makes for great looking, durable bases. Its a little time consuming but worth the effort. :D

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Basing Figures.

 

1. Assemble the model and spray on undercoat.

 

2. Paint base with textured paint (I use Coat d'Arms - Dark Sand), this is paint with sand in it.

 

3. Paint Model.

 

4. Touch up any areas of the base, (normally by the feet) where I have got some paint on the base, using normal paint.

 

5. Depending on whether I am after mud or sand finish I do one of the following - Mud paint with brown wash and dry brush with dark sand (normal paint not textured). Sand drybrush with light sand colour.

 

6. Allow paint to dry

 

7. Varnish Model and allow varnish to dry (at least 24 hours)

 

8. If mud add spots of PVA glue (undiluted) and dip in bag of static grass

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I dunno', but I think I have fallen off the bandwagon with my bases.   I still use sand.  

 

I use matte overcoat in place of glue, and apply it some-what heavy onto the base.

Then dip it into the sand.....carefully scraping off the sand that is stuck onto undesirable areas.

Let dry......

Use a watered-down dark green and let the sand soak it up....let dry.

Dry brush a light green.....then finally put another coat of matte overcoat.

 

This process does not create a super-realistic base, but it is good enough for me.  Also, it will stand the test of time for those who game with their figs.   Never once lost a grain of sand....depsite constant handling, coke spills, droppage....and other misc. mishaps. :;):

 

As for creating a uneven surface.....I like Testors Sculpting Putty. (ya know in the little gray tube) It feels chalky when dried, but is super strong....good for filling in simple gaps too.

Just beware, the stuff stinks to high heaven.

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