Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Digital M@

I am bored and need a new book

Recommended Posts

Before I start re-reading some book I have read a dozen times I figured I would ask and see what other people are reading. I am open to almost any genre except romance.

 

So, what are you reading?

 

 

As October nears, I strongly recommend A Night in Lonesome Oct by Roger Zelazney. The book has 31 chapters, one for each day of the month. It is out of print, but not too hard to find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished Lamb, A Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore, it was good for a laugh. Also just re-read Cat's Cradle by Vonnegut which was also good. If you are interested in a mystical realism type fiction, A Wild Sheep Chase by Murakami is good, though a bit strange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use to read almost all DND books, mainly DL or FR but I fell off those when I dropped gaming until I picked it back up when 3.0 came out, anyways when Ebberron's novels came out I had to try the first one, & it was good read, good characters great story. I read the 2nd book & I'm on the 3rd one now (they are start of seperate series btw).

 

I bought the 3rd one before I went to Rcon this year, & read a few chapters during the flgith down there & back here but kinda lost interest in it, until earlier this month I picked it up again, good stuff. the book is called the Crimson Talisman, it's about a magical item that can either help a person or turn on him depending on the situation & the mood of the user.

 

The story is focusing on a half elf who is the current Keeper of the horn (it's a mini unicorn horn), anyways the the 1/2e companions are a peddler (there is more to him then you think), & a cleric who's more in the grey areas of alignment.

 

the current setting is a sect of elves that are similar to voodoo types & the party is currently in an area called Madwood, which is an area of twisted magic of an era long ago. Game terms it boils down to the pcs must make will or mind saves every day or week(can't recall) to see if they lose atribute points or go completely mad, but so far the book has really traverse quite an area in Ebberon, northern storm swept areas, halfing plains, Valenar(which is arabic/mongolian elves) & now the island of the voodoo elves.

 

All the awile a vampire & his group of thugs are after the horn & it's keeper.

 

Randy M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just picked up the gormenghast novels. I've only read the first ten pages or so that I looked at in the book store, but it looks like a good book. Real vocabulary stretcher. It is about a giant castle and the folks who live in it. It had a bunch of good critics including CS Lewis who said it was as good as tolkien's stuff (high praise 'cuz lewis and tolkien were pals).

 

I just finished John McCain's biography Faith Of My Fathers definately worth reading even if you don't like McCain. It ends before his political career so you don't have to read about any politician junk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How the Irish Saved Civilization by Thomas Cahill, I just finished it and it's pretty good. Nonfiction, light and easy (although when you're trying to balance it with the required reading for anthropology...) and some interesting ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC How the Irish Saved Civilization was pretty well criticized by professionals that I know...

 

A few weeks ago finished up Guy Gavriel Kay's latest(?) Last Light of the Sun. Very good. For those not familair, Kay writes fantasy books that are really historicals, but with the names changed and a veneer of fantasy put over it. It was fun to match up the characters in his book with RW personalities...

 

Previous to that I read A Canticle for Liebowitz, which was IMHO an awesome book, and well worth the years of searching it took me to get my hands on it.

 

Right now I'm reading When Christ and his Saints Slept by Sharon Kay Penman. The book is straight historical fiction, and involves the tumultuous period of the reign of King Stephen and the civil war with Maude, daughter of King Henry I and mother to future King Henry II. Utterly fascinated by this period, and the twin reigns of both Stephen and Henry II. Colorful characters both. So far the book is so-so, but I'm only 50pgs in.

 

BTW, if you have not read Dune yet, it's well worth the time. Also pick up some Heinlein while you're at it. The Moon is a Harsh Mistress was an awesome book as well. Also loved Niven/Pournelle's The Mote in God's Eye and the sequel The Gripping Hand.

 

On my to-read pile now are Card's new one Magic Street. WHile we're at it, read Ender's Game, another great. I had read Card's Song of Earth series and thought it OK. Also I picked up Dan Simmon's Olympos without realising it was a sequel. Whoops!

 

Damon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Blink : The Power of Thinking Without Thinking By Malcom Gladwell

 

Amazon's brief review capsule:

Blink is about the first two seconds of looking--the decisive glance that knows in an instant. Gladwell, the best-selling author of The Tipping Point, campaigns for snap judgments and mind reading with a gift for translating research into splendid storytelling. Building his case with scenes from a marriage, heart attack triage, speed dating, choking on the golf course, selling cars, and military maneuvers, he persuades readers to think small and focus on the meaning of "thin slices" of behavior. The key is to rely on our "adaptive unconscious"--a 24/7 mental valet--that provides us with instant and sophisticated information to warn of danger, read a stranger, or react to a new idea.

Gladwell includes caveats about leaping to conclusions: marketers can manipulate our first impressions, high arousal moments make us "mind blind," focusing on the wrong cue leaves us vulnerable to "the Warren Harding Effect" (i.e., voting for a handsome but hapless president). In a provocative chapter that exposes the "dark side of blink," he illuminates the failure of rapid cognition in the tragic stakeout and murder of Amadou Diallo in the Bronx. He underlines studies about autism, facial reading and cardio uptick to urge training that enhances high-stakes decision-making. In this brilliant, cage-rattling book, one can only wish for a thicker slice of Gladwell's ideas about what Blink Camp might look like. --Barbara Mackoff

 

Very interesting. I'm enjoying it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'd like to add to this thread by first saying how wonderful it is to see the variety - the sundryness - to the genres we are all reading. makes my library at home look less odd in it's diversity :-D

 

i just finished Gillian Bradshaw _The_Sand-Reckoner_ - a historical fiction about Archimedes as a young man. the drive and passion for mathematic he had is well represented but not the mathematics (alas! sor some, whooh! for others noit so sciebtificallt inclined). a very good read for it's feel for the non-roman world during the early Roman Republic's expansion. as good as Mary Renault's _Last_of_the_Wine_ - which i also recommend.

 

moving on to the next book is usually a difficult task for me - often have to wait a few days to subconsciously digest the previous. but onward from here i opened Louis L'Amour's _The_Lonesome_Gods_. i used to read some really pointless westerns when i was 11 or 12 - the "Men's Adventure" types that was the testosterone counterpoint to Romance novels, but Louis L'Amour transends that - simple enough that a kid couls get around the plot, but some complexity and meat to the characters with realism in a genre ripe with "unreal" points.

 

being one to never have just one book going at a time, i'm also turning through Baroness Orczy's _The_Scarlet_Pimpernel_ - though i found it free on Gutenberg.org i still wanted a paperback copy to read in the throne...well whereever i may be!

 

enjoy whatever your reading

 

"Woe to him who reads only one book" - Samual Johnson (i think!?!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll second a nomination for Ender's Game. One of my all time favorites. Actually right now I've caved in and am reading my wife's Harry Potter books, and the CAV2 beta 1.5 rules though those don't make for much of a story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'll second a nomination for Ender's Game. One of my all time favorites. Actually right now I've caved in and am reading my wife's Harry Potter books, and the CAV2 beta 1.5 rules though those don't make for much of a story.

 

 

I'll make a third nomination for Enders Game. Easy reading, good plot. Also, the Stars at War series by David Weber and Steve White. The correct order is Crusade, In Death Ground, The Shiva Option and Insurrection. In Death Ground is one of my all time favorites. They aren't "hard" science fiction but they aren't silly sci-fi either. Characters die, ships are destroyed by the hundreds...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now I'm re-reading several of Robert E. Howard's Conan and Kull stories for an article I'm writing. I'm also reading Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. I just finished Foley Is Good, A Lower Deep, and Rebel Without A Crew.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading The Three Musketeers by Dumas, and I just finished with The Princess of Mars by Burroughs. I'll also put in a vote for Dune and Enders Game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ender's Game is a fantastic book. It's too bad that the other books in the series were not nearly as good. I loved Dune. I'm probably guessing you;ve read both of those already though.

 

 

Other things I have read recently and rather enjoyed. The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson. The books are a bit plodding at times, although could have also been due to the fact I was reading it in 30 minute spurts as opposed to my usual 1 hour blocks, but I really enjoyed the plot. Great weaving of history and fiction. Set later 16 and earlier 1700's mostly in Europe.

 

I also reecntly read the Chanur series by C.J. Cherryh. I tend to really enjoy her novels. I just wish there was more written in the Union-Alliance Universe. I really haven't read a book of hers I did not enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...