Jump to content

Glaze - Holy Grail?


Lastman
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 31
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I couldn't help noticing that the technique of "slobbering" paint, letting it sit for awhile, then "shlorping" off the excess is very similar to what they tell you to do with wood "stains"...maybe we could call this technique "staining" :)

 

On a side note, does anyone wish to tackle some overseas terminology that I've been running into in articles from France and Spain?

 

"Filtering", "tints" and "veils"? My suspicion is that these are refering to glazes? and are best guess translations.

 

Can anyone from Spain or France illuminate ("illuminate" also shows up a lot...I'm guessing illuminate = highlight? :rolleyes: )

Thanks

AWhang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heh, I've been harvesting Amazon.com for terminology books and I must say that we use alot more words than I can find in the books I've gotten so far.

 

Glazing: All of the above descriptions fit it

Washing: Conflicting definitions. Some say it's the same as glazing, some say it's used only on top of primer (while glazing is supposed to add to existing colors and do the blending).

Lifting: I think this is the Shlorping we're talking about... but only if there's been underpainting. It's basically lifting the glaze or wash (depending on your definition) from the highest point of the area (in regard to highlights) so that the highest point is, well, the brightest highlight.

 

Any of this making any sense?

 

Lifting is also called rubbing and/or sponging by some...

 

heh

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The technique of putting a thinned-down transparent color over a different color, waiting a bit, and then removing most of the transparent color, gets called "antiquing" in the ceramics world (I'm talking about the stuff that's done with clay slip poured into molds). Uh, except for the fact that when I learned it, they were using oil-based schtuff that was almost the consistency of paste. (And that was in the early 90s, so they may have changed terms since then.) "Staining" in ceramics meant "antiquing directly on bisque".

 

Rubbing used a wax-based schtuff that you applied, with q-tip or finger, only to raised areas. After each color, you had to spray the piece; otherwise, the next color you used would blend -- often not the way you wanted it to.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Been a long time since I took a real painting class that actually used any form of proper terminology, but...

 

Tints generally refered to lightening paints by adding white to them (or by thinning them down when painting on a white canvas).

 

Veils are succesive layers of glazes or washes in different colors. The paints are thinned very much so - and you don't generally cover the whole area.

 

Filtering is drawing a blank - though I seem to remember something refering to subtractive color theory (using colors to cause the eye to think it sees something other than what is really there?).

 

As for glazes - think colored glass. You should be able to see what is behind it...but it should be tinted by the glaze.

 

I really like to use glazes for anything that shouldn't have an abrupt color change. A light touch and a thin glaze will give you nearly porcelain looking skin tones, as well as silky cloth and what not. Most the time I tend to anglaze, just since it is easier and faster. A clean brush will wick up almost all the paint if you let it - so you can still have the base coat color shine through where you want it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read about filtering on TMP, briefly. It's like a super-transparent glaze to create an essentially imperceptible colour-shift over the whole miniature; like filming with a filter on the camera lens to make scenes warmer or more subdued. SO for example you might put a superthin yellow glaze on your crusaders, no enough to make them yellower, just somehow more sunlit, whilst your Overlords got a blue filter to make them not bluer but subtly gloomier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Reaper User

<after an extensive search on the above terms, adds another bloody page to her glossary of terms in the Painting Book Behemoth just under "Glazes"...gah...>

 

Every time I turn around my glossary gets bigger. ::): I guess I'm doomed to be obsolete by the time I publish no matter what--the hobby grows faster than my manuscript! :lol:

 

--Anne :;):

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, lets see if I've got this right...

 

Glaze - Why: smoothing gradations between layers with excessively thinned paints. Restoring color

lost during highlights. Effecting color shifts (think colored glass or gels, "veil")

How: loosely pooled ("slobber", "anglaze") OR deliberately placed (painted, "suglaze"). May or may not

be followed by the shlorpping of excess paint off surface.

 

Wash - Why: adding shadows with one simple coat.

How: thinned paints (usually with some form of flow improver/surfactant) directed into recesses

and around raised detail OR same as glaze OR only over bare primer (if white primer, similar to a tint?)

 

Tint - Why: adding white to "lighten" a color

How: glazing over (white?) primer (see alternate description for Wash) or adding white.

 

Veil - Why: effecting subtle color shifts

How: Glazes or Washes (thinned) of a different color, controlled application

 

Anglaze - AKA: Glawsh / Waze?

Why: glazes where placement allows for some looseness

How: Excessively thinned paints pooled in sections (the slobber), allowed to sit for 2-3 seconds,

followed by the wicking up of excess glaze (the shlorp)

 

Suglaze - Why: painted, more deliberate placement of glaze

How: thinned paints painted deliberately onto areas

 

Slobbering - Why: (see Anglaze)

How: pooling paint in areas where absolute control isn't called for.

(Point of contention, see Glawsh / Waze)

 

Shlorpping - AKA: "lifting" over a base coat, "rubbing", "sponging"

Why: (see Anglaze), clearing highlight area of unwanted paint, emphasizing highlight area.

How: pulling excess fluid off with a clean brush (through capillary action?)

 

Glawsh / Waze - AKA: Anglaze

Why: Looser glaze, covers larger area or when precise control isn't ecessary.

How: half-way between a glaze and a wash. Loosely placed glaze, excess sucked up with a brush

 

Filtering - AKA: Veil (applied over whole mini?)

Why: to effect subtle color shifts over the whole model

How: Super-transparent Glaze

 

Chocolate Martini - Why: spoon full of sugar to help this medicine go down :)

How: intravenously

 

Does this pretty much cover it? :)

 

Thanks

AWhang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Runs that whole mess through babble fish, spits it back out and and goes back to describing her techniques instead of naming them. I have a hard enough time talkingand making sense. ::P:

 

Is this what the book you left on the shore while you were out on teh deep end was about, Sue? In which case I'm going to keep it under water with me, properly glorshing it and not give it back till the chocolate martinis wear off. :devil:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, lets see if I've got this right...

 

Glaze - Why: smoothing gradations between layers with excessively thinned paints. Restoring color

lost during highlights. Effecting color shifts (think colored glass or gels, "veil")

How: loosely pooled ("slobber", "anglaze") OR deliberately placed (painted, "suglaze"). May or may not

be followed by the shlorpping of excess paint off surface.

 

Wash - Why: adding shadows with one simple coat.

How: thinned paints (usually with some form of flow improver/surfactant) directed into recesses

and around raised detail OR same as glaze OR only over bare primer (if white primer, similar to a tint?)

 

Tint - Why: adding white to "lighten" a color

How: glazing over (white?) primer (see alternate description for Wash) or adding white.

 

Veil - Why: effecting subtle color shifts

How: Glazes or Washes (thinned) of a different color, controlled application

 

Anglaze - AKA: Glawsh / Waze?

Why: glazes where placement allows for some looseness

How: Excessively thinned paints pooled in sections (the slobber), allowed to sit for 2-3 seconds,

followed by the wicking up of excess glaze (the shlorp)

 

Suglaze - Why: painted, more deliberate placement of glaze

How: thinned paints painted deliberately onto areas

 

Slobbering - Why: (see Anglaze)

How: pooling paint in areas where absolute control isn't called for.

(Point of contention, see Glawsh / Waze)

 

Shlorpping - AKA: "lifting" over a base coat, "rubbing", "sponging"

Why: (see Anglaze), clearing highlight area of unwanted paint, emphasizing highlight area.

How: pulling excess fluid off with a clean brush (through capillary action?)

 

Glawsh / Waze - AKA: Anglaze

Why: Looser glaze, covers larger area or when precise control isn't ecessary.

How: half-way between a glaze and a wash. Loosely placed glaze, excess sucked up with a brush

 

Filtering - AKA: Veil (applied over whole mini?)

Why: to effect subtle color shifts over the whole model

How: Super-transparent Glaze

 

Chocolate Martini - Why: spoon full of sugar to help this medicine go down :)

How: intravenously

 

Does this pretty much cover it? :)

 

Thanks

AWhang

 

Yep. Perfect. Thank you. Except for the Martini part, I've copied this into my notebook! Martinis should be taken in quantities of no more than two, with grindibles.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shlorpping - AKA: "lifting" over a base coat, "rubbing", "sponging"

I'm sorry, but every time I read the word "shlorpping" - or, lord help me, if I say it *aloud* - I just start cracking up (much to the consternation of my co-workers). And don't even get me started on "slobbering".

 

Do MSPs contain maturity extender particles? If so, I may need to look into this brush licking thing.

 

-Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think anyone would be interested in the flynnglaze...it's basically a spit glaze.

 

I use the flynnglaze. I mean I use the technique. Not an ACTUAL flynnglaze. So, I guess it would be a whizglaze using the flynnglaze technique as I'm fresh out of flynnglaze spit. Not that I've ever had any. We've never swapped any spit... that is to say, I already have my own...

 

Oh, never mind. Shutting up now. :wacko:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
  • Who's Online   2 Members, 1 Anonymous, 27 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...