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Anyone ever use this?


Myrhev
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Was looking around for a better way to shake my bottles of paint and came across this..

 

http://www.hobbylinc.com/htm/rob/rob411.htm

 

Was wondering if anyone had ever used it or something similar. I am starting to have issues with carpal tunnel and am looking for ways to take some of the wear and tear off of my wrists/hands (other than quitting painting/typing because yah know, why go on living :p ). Anyways, I came across this and was wondering. If someone HAS used it or a similar product, please give a little review and if it is a different product please give me the name of it or a link to it.

 

Thanks a ton!

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Actually I have purchased it and it does save some of the wear and tear on the wrist. However the bad sides are that it uses a rubber strap which means eventually it will break (mine did) and also do to the extreme shaking I had to get a clamp to secure it to the table. But it does the job it was made for.

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I had one, but was always very disappointed with it. I found it didn't really mix paint very well, especially difficult to mix paint like Vallejo Model Color.

The problem is that all it does is vibrate the paint, not shake it. Thicker paint doesn't respond well to it. Even when I'd leave a bottle in it for 20 straight minutes.

And don't expect to hold a conversation while it is going. These things are LOUD!

All in all, I haven't found anything that can beat 60 seconds of violent wrist action. :-)

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After trying to make a paint shaking device (I found some plans online), and spending a small fortune doing it, and only to have the thing overheat and smell, I decided to go to the other extreme...:)

 

The ultimate overkill!

 

I recently got something like this on ebay. If anyone is interested, I can let you know how it works after I receive it.

I use mostly VMC and my arms can't handle the amount of shaking necessary to get the paint well mixed. I'm really hoping that this will do the trick.

 

search: scientific equipment vortex mixer :)

 

If it doesn't work, I can at least start my own "Mad Scientist Lab"

 

Thanks

AWhang

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I remember these from Chem lab in college, and always thought if I was going to get a mechanical mixer, this would be the kind, or perhaps one of the orbital shakers. Not sure exactly how well either would mix up the paint however.

 

Curious what the cost would be retail for one of them too. It's lab equipment, so you know it's likely been marked up a smidge :lol:

 

 

Eastman, if you check out this thread, I know you have to have these by the dozens at work. Have you ever tried one with a paint bottle to see how it worked?

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I remember these from Chem lab in college, and always thought if I was going to get a mechanical mixer, this would be the kind, or perhaps one of the orbital shakers. Not sure exactly how well either would mix up the paint however.

 

Curious what the cost would be retail for one of them too. It's lab equipment, so you know it's likely been marked up a smidge :lol:

 

 

Eastman, if you check out this thread, I know you have to have these by the dozens at work. Have you ever tried one with a paint bottle to see how it worked?

 

I've never tried a Vortex Genie (the Cadillac of Vortex mixers) on paint. I can give it a try sometime after RCon (I'm not going in to work today - too much to do before I leave tomorrow - and I know that if I do go in, one of the people I work for will try to make me attend a meeting on Friday and there is no way I'm going to do that).

 

I have agitators in all my Vallejo Model Color bottles, and I've always found the Robart to do a really good job mixing them (30 seconds is generally enough time).

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Awesome and thanks for all of the replies everyone. I will see how the vortex mixer works when someone tries it and if it isn't up to the level of the Robart, then I'll get the Robart. With the amount that I have to use a computer and the time that I love to spend painting (when I have the fever), I need to do every little thing I can to cut down on carpal tunnel risk.

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Awesome and thanks for all of the replies everyone. I will see how the vortex mixer works when someone tries it and if it isn't up to the level of the Robart, then I'll get the Robart. With the amount that I have to use a computer and the time that I love to spend painting (when I have the fever), I need to do every little thing I can to cut down on carpal tunnel risk.

 

 

Do to the joys of arthritis, I've gotten to the point where I have to use these guys or not paint. I also live with another mini painter so we have quite a few of the guys anywhere either of us tend to paint. There is a noticable difference between the quality of the battery version and the AC version. With the same amount of wear and tear , I've managed to burn out two battery versions past all salvaging while my AC one is still going strong. If you go with a Robart shaker, I'd strongly suggest getting the AC version. It's quieter, takes far more abuse and in general the quality control on those is much much higher than the battery one.

 

Maya~

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I've used it & it worked alot better than my arthritic hands... I did manage to kill mine & will order one as soon as the day job slows down and I get back to painting more frequently...

 

*sigh*

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My hands already shake pretty badly and interfere with painting as it is; shaking paints manually makes it worse and makes my wrists ache a little. I'm an IT guy, already on the verge of carpal tunnel and/or arthritis, so I rely on a mixer/shaker.

 

I looked for a vortexer on eBay and elsewhere, even asking a friend's wife (a polymer chemist) for lab equipment resources. I really wanted one that handles a tray full of bottles/tubes all at once, but found nothing. Trade magazines, eBay and elsewhere turned up only heavy-duty, unsuitable and/or expensive stuff. When contacted, I ran into snooty people who wouldn't talk to me because I am not a lab, flakey sales people, unreturned calls, lost e-mails and general frustration. I am curious to know how much the one E and K Scientific one costs, how it works for paint, etc.

 

I considered (and ultimately discarded the idea) of packing a bunch of paints very tightly together, surrounding them with tightly taped bubble wrap, cramming them into an empty 1 gallon paint can, and taking it around the corner to a Porter Paints store. The plan was to tell them my paint had settled quite a bit and and to ask them to throw it in their big shaker for 5 minutes or so.

 

Instead, I ordered the AC version from Hobbylinc months ago and have used it quite a bit since then. As for performance, I use agitators clipped from old minis, slag piles, skulls, heads, whatever, in all my paints. I have no VMCs/VGCs, but it works fine for MSPs, RPPs, GW, salvaged old Ral Partha paints (yes, you read that right; for basing & terrain use only). A minute or two on the Robart mixer saves me time & effort better spent on painting, prep, cleanup, etc.

 

It's a little loud, but that just keeps me from using it late at night when the family is asleep. It tends to wander around a little bit, very slowly, but that's no big deal. If I need to let it run for a while and can't be bothered to look at it more than once per minute to keep it from falling off the table, I'll set it on the floor, in a box lid, or in a box lid on the floor. The power cord is woefully short, though, so don't be surprised when it only reaches from the edge of your table straight down to the floor.

 

The 'rubber band' strap is fine for holding eyedropper bottles or various jars up to the size of RPPs. As for longevity, it seems like it should last for a long time unless exposed to extremes of heat/cold, humidity/lack thereof, or severe stretching, imho. The useful life of almost any rubber band or similar 'gum' product can be extended by kneading a drop or two of glycerine into it. Check with your local R/C model store -- it's usually used for rubber-band powered aircraft. If that's too pricey and/or too much effort, make your own with big rubber bands and scissors, an x-acto or a punch/awl of some sort. Call me lazy, but when I ordered the shaker from Hobbylinc I also ordered the extra pack of straps -- 5 for $4.39. A strap that seems like it will last a year is well worth about $0.88 each, to me. If it prevents losses in paint bottles at $2 or $3 each, the shaker and straps are well worth it.

 

To the other folks re: the battery-powered unit, THANK YOU. I almost bought one for travel, but now that I know about the difference in quality, I think I'll pass.

 

Sorry for the loooong post...too much caffeine, not enough sleep!

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I looked for a vortexer on eBay and elsewhere, even asking a friend's wife (a polymer chemist) for lab equipment resources. I really wanted one that handles a tray full of bottles/tubes all at once, but found nothing. Trade magazines, eBay and elsewhere turned up only heavy-duty, unsuitable and/or expensive stuff. When contacted, I ran into snooty people who wouldn't talk to me because I am not a lab, flakey sales people, unreturned calls, lost e-mails and general frustration. I am curious to know how much the one E and K Scientific one costs, how it works for paint, etc.

 

The good lab quality ones are painfully expensive (I used to have to order new ones when I worked out at MCL in Sacramento). The lower end models started in the $150 range and went up from there. A good multi-speed mixer with touch activation will easily hit the $450 mark. You can pick them up from time to time in good used condition (most I have seen on EBay though are far from good). I got mine at a DRMO auction when they still had those regularly - but you might want to look at the local yellow pages for medical equipment repair companies.

 

If they can't repair it for lab use effectively you can often pick them up cheap - normally it ends up being a problem with the speed control rheostat which limits the level of control (not so important when you are just mixing paints).

 

As far as new retail Vortexers - Lab Safety Company and Carolina Biological Supply both sell them.

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...(most I have seen on EBay though are (far) from from good).

 

Mine finally arrived, and Joe's insight is dead on.

 

The brand that I bought (used and looks it) is Glas-col. It measures 15cm wide x 20cm long x 17cm tall...that's a bit of real estate if perched on your painting desk.

 

It has the small rubber cap/head made to take test tubes but I found that I could securely hold Reaper Pro and Citadel jars without problems. Vallejo (and I'm guessing RMP) worked great. Some on ebay have interchangable heads!

 

My touch cap function (pressing the cap should make it turn on) was dead so I need to turn it on and off manually. The speed pot and pulse function works fine.

 

Unfortunately, I can't compare this to a Robart as I've never owned one, so this may be of little use to those who need a comparison.

 

Here's what I did as a quick test. I happen to have duplicate paints so I tried hand shaking and vortexing, and comparing the results...the tests are not conclusive (nor very scientific).

 

I had two bottles of VMC Azure, both with what looked like dry air pockets at the base.

30 seconds hand shaking, I still had the air pockets. (15 additional seconds on the vortexer fixed that)

30 seconds on the vortexer, no air pockets.

 

Two bottles of VMC Carmine Red - one with an agitator (lead shot), one without.

30 seconds hand shaking with agitator, paint came out mixed, no clear liquid.

30 seconds vortex'g w/o agitator, same as above.

 

Two bottles of VMC Light Sea Grey

30 seconds hand shaking, paint came out mixed, no clear liquid.

30 seconds vortex'g, same as above.

 

VMC Smoke

15-30 seconds, well mixed w/o clear liquid (I'm not sure what I was expecting, Smoke is a pretty easy one to mix up anyways).

 

If anything, the vortexer does work and it's relatively quiet. Mine vibrated a bit but I didn't suction it down properly on the table (four suction cups for feet). Probably wouldn't be good in a paint club situation as it does vibrate the work surface it's on. Also tends to rotate the bottles in the direction one would use to unscrew a cap (although I had no instances of a cap coming undone).

 

A quick 15-30 seconds with other colors and I don't get any clear liquid (the bane of my existence).

 

Again, I hesitate to recommend this over any other type of rig (exept for a home made one!). I paid $31.00usd on ebay (included shipping) so I'm happy. I know my arm is going to be happy too ::D:

 

I hope this was helpful.

 

Thanks

AWhang

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