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Hello there all!

 

I had a small question to ask you all. If ones tends to use alot of drybrushing on the mini's does this make them seem unskilled? I mean if someone likes to use the technique and has learned to use it with good results does it make them appear to paint like a beginner?

 

Thanks for your time :;):

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In case you wanted a longer answer...

 

Mini painting is like almost everything else, there is no one right way. It has it's benefits and drawbacks. And the bottom line is, that if you are happy with the results, who cares what others think.

 

That said, drybrushing is a quick and easy way to give more life and a better look to a mini. Anyone can do it, and anyone can make a mini look much better with it.

 

The downside, drybrushing can give a mini a "chalky" appearance. And your ability to make smooth transistions from mid-color to highlight is limited if not non-existant. The "Professional" painters use layer, which is much more time consuming, but much more purposeful, whereas drybrushing is much more "accidental" by relation.

 

Typically, drybrushing is seen as the first step, with stuff like layering being learned later. This is where the stigma that drybrushing is for the unskilled comes from. However, like I said before, if you are happy with your mini's, it don't matter one bit what anyone else thinks.

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Every time you drybrush - Anne sheds a tear. It is said that on nights before major Warlord tournys when players are rushing to finish their figs - Anne weeps openly and has minions collect her tears to use as part of the Master Series Paint Thinner. ;)

 

TWJolson gives a great answer.

 

Drybrushing is just another technique - and it's usually the first one that most painters learn - so very often it is seen as "unskilled" as most examples of it are. As painters develop they often learn techniques that are better suited for their paints and that will give them better results that they are looking for - such as blending, layering etc..

 

It is still a perfectly valid technique and can often be used to great effect. We have a guy near me who drybrushed up a whole Tyranid army - and he does so in very subtle increments so the end result is FANTASTIC. It's really a beautiful army. It's also a great technique to get figures done quickly - to paint up sand flocked bases, to build terrain pieces and to give large pieces of armor (such as tanks) some depth on the large broad flat surfaces.

 

You can also get great results using a drybrush technique with glazing as it will smooth out the chalkiness.

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Another way to avoid chalkiness is to 1) THIN YOUR PAINTS, and 2) use an extender, like Liquitex Slo-Dri (or its generic Folkart equivalent). Chalkiness appears to be a function of the paint drying, pulling, etc, before it can be layered on. Thin paints and extender will help eliminate this. Also extender allows you to feather the edges a bit better, and creates a bit of transparency to the paint.

 

Damon.

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Hi Adenosine,

 

Drybrushing does not make one seem unskilled. It's a very valid technique; and one that many very good artists have used at one point or another. Mike McVey used to do some pretty amazing drybrush work, and so did Jason Richards. (Here's an example on this Tyranid)

 

Twjolson and SaintRigger have given good replies already. The most important thing is that you are having fun while you paint. Go with what feels right to you!

 

-Fremen

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Asking if a technique makes one look unskilled strikes me as akin to the question "do these jeans make my butt look big?" The answer inevitably is "No, it's your butt that makes your butt look big." :;):

 

As with any other painting technique, the painter's skill level will mark him or her as a beginner or unskilled -- not the technique itself. Drybrushing can be used to great effect. And when married with other techniques such as layering or glazing, can result in stunning pieces of art.

 

The problem I think with drybrushing is that many folks rush it, which in turn produces results that appear amateurish. But this is true of any technique, really, as evidenced by the more advanced technique of NMM. Rushing NMM makes for poor effect. So, too, drybrushing.

 

Anyhow, I think the bias against drybrushing arises from the fact that it is one of the first techniques most painters learn and, as such, is widely used by beginners. However, if you consider that most beginning painters also come to learn washing at the same time, it stands to reason that you'd expect critics to remark to veteran painters "oh, you washed that miniature? You n00b." But nobody ever does. Why? Probably because it's easier to achieve smooth results with a wash than it is with a drybrush, which really does require slow, methodical application coupled with a series of glazes to work properly.

 

So, no... Drybrushing doesn't mark one as an unskilled beginner. It's the painter's skill that marks him or her as such.

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Thanks Guys!

 

For all the great feedback on the subject. I do enjoy drybrushing but I tend to mix blending with it alot. But on a side note the more I play around with blending the more I enjoy it. Just means alot of mixing paints in different shades. I have been out of the hobby for about a year or so and just wanted to see if it was still a huge stigma to do it and post a mini in show off.

 

Well off to the table

Look for a few minis coming soon and see.

 

Thanks :;):

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But on a side note the more I play around with blending the more I enjoy it. Just means alot of mixing paints in different shades.

 

The more you begin to work with transparency, the less you'll have need to mix paints for blending. I used to mix loads of paint -- both to achieve new-not-from-the-bottle hues and smooth blends. I hardly ever do now because I've learned to work with very transparent paint, which permits me to achieve very smooth transitions and delightful coloring.

 

Practice your blends (preferably on a piece of scrap blister or some other palette) using thinned, transparent paint. You'll find your transitions a lot smoother, a lot more varied, and of the appearance of "great skill." :;):

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The key is that you are painting to enjoy the hobby and to please yourself. As it was stated before.."who cares what others think." If you find pleasure in painting using the Drybrush technique then go for it..:).

I would never have considered myself unskilled when I used the "D" technique so neither should you. As time passes try the other types of painting and progress at your own pace. My advice to you is to find an advanced painter in your area and see if he/she is willing to spend some time painting together. You can learn a lot by just watching someone.

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