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Evilbob

Paint Contests

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My problem is the black and white heavy pallette for them.
...resistance is few-tile...you will be assimilated ::D:

The hi/low contrasts is a hurdle that you can conquer... practice, practice,practice.

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NMM vs. metallics is a very hot issue. I love using metallics. When I see two minis done in the two styles, done at their best, I always prefer the metallics. My idol when it comes to metallics is Jakob Rune Nielsen. http://www.jrn-works.dk/ He has a true mastery over the medium and I have never seen a NNM that I would pick over any of his stuff. I consider metallics and free hand my favorite techniques as well as my strengths, but I've currently got nothing on this guy. :wacko:

 

PS. If you think it takes NMM to win just check his list of awards.

14 Demon statues, 1 Open Competition Cup, and 2 Slayer Swords!

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I think one reason why NMM seems to get more awards is that, even when it does not actually succeed at being NMM, it still has all that extreme highlighting and shading that a lot of judges like.

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Speaking as a past judge at both GenCon and ReaperCon, it depends on the judges/arena. Golden Demons are heavily biased toward metallics--the company itself encourages this bias in its employees. It does somewhat depend on the judges, but most of the time in the past the judges have been guys from the Promo department, sometimes paired with a guest judge from the UK, so it's pretty predictable. For GenCon and ReaperCon it becomes a lot more idiosyncratic. However, for both of these venues you are being judged by top-level painters, so the first thing they're going to look at isn't whether it's a metallic or NMM, it's whether the technique is done well. In my own painting I prefer Demi-Metallics, so I can confidently say it wouldn't matter to me as a judge, but I'm often an exception. :;):

 

--Anne ::D:

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Heh, I woke up in the middle of the night and thought, 'I should really reply to that thread, even if it's a bit late.' ::P:

 

As one of the three judges this year at ReaperCon I'd like to share my thoughts. Anne is absolutely correct--looking at Flynn's Sokar the first time, I did not think of metallics or NMM, but 'That's definitely a first cut'. I think Remy's Christmas Sophie also used metallics?

 

As mentioned earlier, it's still going to depend on what contests you enter. ReaperCon and GenCon, at least, will always have some experienced painters judging (though they won't always agree on what to look for, even with judging guidelines. Drawback of having human beings do these things.) Anne has tried especially hard with the ReaperCon contest to eliminate as many subjective factors as possible, and to focus on aspects of technique that can be objectively evaluated. In nearly every category, we (the judges) had to consciously set style preferences aside and concentrate on how well different styles were executed. There were both vivid high-contrast and muted low-contrast winners. And believe me, when it got down to ranking some of those entries, we were hunting for mold lines, hairs caught in the paint, smears, and unpainted bits to make the call for us.

 

Poorly done NMM loses as many 'points' as poorly done metallics. As a judge of many contests, I have, though, tended to see more bad metallics than bad NMM--grainy, unshaded or clumsily ink-washed, relying on the metal flake and/or gloss coat to give the effect of highlights. In many cases the painters of the metallics hadn't refined their technique beyond the tabletop application, whereas the painters who'd attempted NMM had thought much more about how metal really looks. It also takes a lot of skill to make flake paint 'read' as metal-part-of-the-miniature and not as metallic paint, something that is in part less difficult with NMM at 30mm scale.

 

Ditto the advice that if your metallics are as thoughtfully painted as they should be, they won't be a disadvantage (at ReaperCon at least!). Your 60 hours of effort will certainly get a second look. I'd love to see more demi-metallics and Dull-coted metallics in contests, since they can be so striking.

 

 

--Jen 'If it's not agonizing, you're not judging' Haley

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Jen's comment about Dull-coted metallics brings up an interesting point. When I first took pictures of my Avatar of Sokar (the one that I posted in the show-off section here), it hadn't been dullcoted, so the metallics were pretty shiny. After the dullcote application, of course, the metallics got dulled down quite a bit. After doing this, I went back over what I thought would be the shinier bits of the metal sections and re-applied a few layers of a couple of different shades of metallic paint to it. The pictures of the Avatar in the Reaper gallery show the final result, which is a combination of dullcoted and non-dullcoted metallics.

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Heh, I woke up in the middle of the night and thought, 'I should really reply to that thread, even if it's a bit late.' ::P:

 

As one of the three judges this year at ReaperCon I'd like to share my thoughts. Anne is absolutely correct--looking at Flynn's Sokar the first time, I did not think of metallics or NMM, but 'That's definitely a first cut'. I think Remy's Christmas Sophie also used metallics?

 

Hi, Jen. ^_^ Yep, I used metallics on my Christmas Sophie. The main reason was I've never tried NMM before. I figured with my limited painting experience that it'd be better to try to learn metallics as well as I could before I try NMM. It was the only time I used alcohol-based metallics (VMC) and I'm glad I clear coated the mini before applying it as I assumed the alcohol base would eat through the acrylic layers on the mini. These metallics had a brilliant sheen compared to standard metallics, but after I used a few more Dull Cote applications to seal the other parts of the mini, the metallic areas did have an interesting muted sheen. To help reestablish the luster of the metal, however, I painted on a gloss varnish. I did this also because I heard that some of these metallic flakes will oxidize over time. Potentially an interesting effect though... just have to wait a few years. ^_^ Unfortunately, as I'm sure you noticed, the gloss coats didn't work enough on the butt end of the warhammer. 1/3 of the blue painted gem was chipped right off to the bare metal! Ack! I'll just have to be more careful. ^_^

 

In any event, I'm sure the judging must've been quite hard. I just wanted to thank you, Sue and Amy for doing a great job. One more thing if you're interested... fellow Reaper painters placed at this year's KublaCon. In the Fantasy Small category, Marike Reimer, Derek Schubert and Laszlo Jakusovszky placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd respectively. Marike Reimer painted Werner Klocke's Freebooter 'Bad Fairy' and also took the Kubla Sword, Derek painted his very own Reaper sculpt (upcoming mini), and Lazslo painted Werner's Alastrial Reaper mini. FWIW, painting from 3:00 pm Saturday till 10:00 am Sunday, I finished as much of my Wolfen Hunter mini that I could and placed 2nd in the Fantasy Large category. ^^; Pics will be up soon if you're interested.

 

Remy

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