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The Internet may be getting slower


ixminis
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One of my mailing lists had this forwarded today. It's worth passing around. The internet would pretty much stink (and probably cost more) if the lobbyists had their filthy way.... Discuss...

 

Forwarded message:

 

As you know, I almost never reach out to you personally with a request to getinvolved in a debate in the U.S. Congress. However, today I feel I must.

 

Right now, the telephone and cable companies in control of Internet access are trying to use their enormous political muscle to dramatically change the Internet. It might be hard to believe, but lawmakers in Washington are seriously debating whether consumers should be free to use the Internet as they

want in the future.

 

The phone and cable companies now control more than 95% of all Internet access. These large corporations are spending millions of dollars to promote legislation that would divide the Internet into a two-tiered system.

 

The top tier would be a "Pay-to-Play" high-speed toll-road restricted to only the largest companies that can afford to pay high fees for preferential access to the Net.

 

The bottom tier -- the slow lane -- would be what is left for everyone else. If the fast lane is the information "super-highway," the slow lane will operate more like a dirt road.

 

Today's Internet is an incredible open marketplace for goods, services, information and ideas. We can't give that up. A two lane system will restrict innovation because start-ups and small companies -- the companies that can't afford the high fees -- will be unable to succeed, and we'll lose out on the jobs, creativity and inspiration that come with them.

 

The power belongs with Internet users, not the big phone and cable companies. Let's use that power to send as many messages as possible to our elected officials in Washington. Please join me by clicking here right now to send a message to your representatives in Congress before it is too late. You can make the

difference.

 

Thank you for reading this note. I hope you'll make your voice heard today.

 

Sincerely,

 

Meg Whitman

President and CEO

eBay Inc.

 

P.S. If you have any questions about this issue, please contact us at

[email protected]

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How is this differant then how it's been, or will forever be? Speed has always cost money. And consumers have always had it slower then the corporations. Nowdays cable speeds are reaching T1 speeds, something that was once only able to be had by universities or businesses. And now that we have T1 speeds, big business and universities have even faster speeds.

 

I am quite distrustful of any one email sources, can anyone verify this? I mean if legislation like this was being seriously talked about, I don't know, I would think the news organizations would break the story, not Ebay! I wouldn't be surprised if it was a hoax. I've seen too many emails sent around like this already.

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I'm trying to figure out the best way of saying this.

 

In the past, a company (such as Google) paid for or otherwise established high speed lines to deliver content with. I want to think that many such high speed lines also rout everyone's data through. Everyone shares.

 

The short version of what is going on here is this: some companies are allowing video entertainment (tv) and VOIP (phone) services over the network. This is now really cheap and in competition with traditional phone and television providers.

 

And so the notion is being put forth to The Government that simply paying for this bandwidth coming out of their own computers isn't enough. They apparently need to pay for the bandwidth use on all of the internet's switching stations because they got too successful.

 

It's really another case of old money not keeping up with the times, then crying to the Government when the times caught up to them.

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I mean if legislation like this was being seriously talked about, I don't know, I would think the news organizations would break the story, not Ebay!

 

The phone and cable companies now control more than 95% of all Internet access.

 

Why would the cable companies, who own the news channels, want you too know about their deals? Just because they REALLY care. Riiight.

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It's not about linkup speeds or an overloaded network. It's aboutthe actual data packets you send having a lower priority than someone who has the expensive connection.

 

No matter how fast your link to the internet is, that won't help you if your packets are of a low priority every time they hit a router.

 

Today my datagrams are treated the same as Bill Gates' datagram. That's what they're trying to change.

 

It is technical and might not make sense or look like a signifficant change, but trust me it IS. If I was a US citizen I'd be fighting very hard to keep this from happening.

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I'd rather keep the internets with the corporations, remember when the UN wanted it's grubby hands on it?

 

third_world_wide_web.jpg

 

Apparently we've still learned nothing from the depression. The more the government wants to regulate utilities and services, the more it screws us in the long run. The market controls and polices itself, best to leave it that way.

 

-NTM

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I've getting these emails for the past 10 years or so, and I can only describe them as high-tech urban legends. They all follow the same format...yahoo! is going to charge for email...the gov't is slowing down the internet...and so on. They usually tell you to click here (warning!!! gawd knows how many of these "concerned emails" are just worm-filled traps ready to screw over your computer) or forward this email to 10 friends. Something tells me that if the CEO of eBay had such an important message to convey, she'd do it via her own website or perhaps CNN/Fox News or the newspaper. Not that such emails don't make for good gossip, I just wouldn't put much weight on them.

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Actually this has been going on for a while.

 

The net has gone from being a research network into being a big fat money milking machine.

 

This particuar mail and others like it may be a scam, but the corperations ARE working on changing the nature of the net.

 

Priority datagrams is one of the last hurdles, and the internet will have completed its transformation from "hippie happy" and "let's all share" to just another aspect of our lives controlled by corporations need for a fatter profit margin.

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Here's how I've seen it go: Corporations push congress-critters buttons for higher regulation in the name of profit. Activists counter their own congress-critter button pushing in the name of net neutrality. It goes back and forth, but is generally ignored. I'm not saying it's a great big deal today, but I am saying it's worthy of being on your long-term radar.

 

I suppose an adequate summary of this is: If you like legislation like the DMCA, you may actually like this. If you think that the government doesn't need to regulate to ensure corporate profitability, then you probably won't.

 

Of course, this goes on top of my assumption that corporate profitability frequently disregards consumer interests over known consumer trends. That's my way of saying that many corps would rather make an obscene/unethical profit than a reasonable one. Of course, not all folks think that there's such a thing as an obscene profit...

 

I digress.... enough o' my babbling.

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With IPv6 datagrams there's already put aside space for the label. This thing isn't new, they've been working in this direction for a very long time.

 

Seriously take the time to study the way the tiered ISP system works today. It's very educational and scary. To me atleast it seems designed to allow for a maximum number of middle men lining their pockets without adding anything at all themselves.

 

The funny thing is that the infrastructure is already there SW. There are exchange points already built (have been since it was a research network) were ISPs can exchange packets. The money hace already been put down, there is no expense in using the exchange points. But in many cases ISPs won't peer with smaller ISPs because there's very little profit in it (big ISP peering with small ISP means nothing to the big ISP but helps out the small ISP incredibly).

 

In the end what we get is an inefficient system built to maximize profits. Nothing else. My point is that in the specific case of the internet there's a profit to be made by being inefficient, and that means capitalist thought is a very bad idea in this case.

 

It's a battle between two schools.

 

School 1: we all share and we all gain from this sharing

 

school 2: we all keep everything to ourselves unless there's profit to be made, thus maximizing our own profits and minimizing the competitiors profit.

 

I'm with school 1 here. (big surprise)

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This particuar mail and others like it may be a scam, but the corperations ARE working on changing the nature of the net.

 

Priority datagrams is one of the last hurdles, and the internet will have completed its transformation from "hippie happy" and "let's all share" to just another aspect of our lives controlled by corporations need for a fatter profit margin.

 

Ohh, Ohhh! Tin Foil Hat time!

 

*puts one on*

 

The moon landings were faked!

 

9/11 was controlled demolition!

 

The Flu vaccine and Muzak are mind control!

 

*Takes it off*

 

Ow, that hurt my brain.

 

-NTM

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