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finding a job shouldn't be this hard


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My advice would be to not limit your job search to one geographical area. Focus on finding a job in your field anywhere you can get one. In most fields, jobs are easier to come by once you've had some experience.

And I'm not just talking about applying in nearby cities, or even nearby states. There's a whole wide world out there!

When my wife graduated with her BA, she certainly didn't limit herself geographically, and ended up spending a year in South Korea! When she graduated with her MA a few months ago, she applied all over the US, and we ended up moving from Minnesota to Texas!

 

If you absolutely need a survival job while doing a broader search, it sounds like you need to pick up the pace of applying. You listed like a half dozen places you applied to. That sounds like the bare minimum for a SINGLE DAY. When I last job hunted (years ago), I was applying at dozens of places every week. it shouldn't take more than an hour to go someplace, fill out an application, and try to talk with a hiring manager. At an hour a pop, 8-10 places a day should be do-able.

 

But persistence is definately key. Think in terms of months, not weeks.

 

Hope something above made sense! :blush:

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Gus made another good point or two. IIRC, when I'm doing "cold" applications, it takes me 1 out of 20 applications for an interview and 1 out of 5 interviews for an offer....

 

So keep on pluggging!!! I like to call it the shotgun approach... just keep shooting and shooting with scatter shot and it'll eventually happen... !!!

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Don't know if this will be appreciated, but I know there are other vets here. Anyone consider the military as an option? They will train you in a field you're interested in, and something you can use once you're out. Anything from mechanic to telecommunications. Plus you get to travel and see other parts of the country or world. I would never have learned to speak Spanish if I hadn't been stationed in Panama, and now I get paid 5% more for speaking it.

 

I know you're worried about the war in Iraq....Join the Navy they stay on boats! (No slam to my Naval brothers in arms....okay maybe a little slam)

 

Seriously though If you go into a more technical field (accounting, etc) You are pretty safe. Plus most people don't realize that vets get hiring preference in all government jobs (can you say job security and benefits)

 

Think about it...I wouldn't trade my military experience for anything. Not trying to brag here, but after 3.5yrs in the Army, and no college degree I am now making six figures.....It's all about what you are willing to do in the short term, to make the long term better.....

 

Nough said

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I actually haven't limited my search to one area. Yeah I like the Northwest Coast, but I've sent applications and resumes to places in California, Texas, Illinois, Maine, Florida, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Arizona, Nevada, even Canada, and well you get the picture.

 

Yeah some of us have thought about the military, but I can tell you now they don't want me. I don't meet their admittance criteria.

 

I've also been looking at government jobs.

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I have to re-apply for my position with the school district here every year. I am an educational assistant for special education. It sucks, and is basicly a way that the schools can get away with "letting us go" over the summer to save on 3 months worth of insurance coverage.

I have no degree, and am not interested in getting one...I will never make enough money to pay off those kind of student loans and be able to put gas in the car.

 

I hear bank robbery is paying well, and if you suck at it, at least you will get free room and board for many years.

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I have no degree, and am not interested in getting one...I will never make enough money to pay off those kind of student loans and be able to put gas in the car.

 

This would be why I keep looking and keep sending out the applications/resumes, so I can actually make the money to pay them off. Right now they are all sitting in deferment as one payment on them right now is currently half my monthly income.

 

I'll be blunt here. If I had the ability to go back in time and change a few things, I would never have gone for my Master's degree and instead would have gone for an interview with Las Vegas School system when they came to my campus while I was a senior in college to recruit for teachers in their schools. I would have had my Master's degree and certification for teaching PAID for by them. At the time I didn't do it because I wanted to teach college level and not high school, that and my advisors told me they felt I would do better as a professor. At the time I also wanted to go for my PhD - a feat that when I finally received my Master's, I said no way to. The idea of spending possibly another 3-7 years dealing with high stress people, along with the ulcers and nerve ticks grad school had already given me, was just not appealing enough to keep putting my health in jeopardy.

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Enchantra, have you tried the local "for profit" universities (Univ of Phoenix, Community College, etc.)? My wife taught at Florida Metropolitan Univ. for several years. Paid real well for the time worked, and helped her get her foot in the door at a 'real' university.

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1. Don't knock nights.

2. You near [REDACTED]? I know know of a plastics place that wants "someone who can pass a drug test" to quote my associate who works the 11pm to 7 AM shift.

3. Temp agencies.

4. Rent-A-Bum[Labor Ready?]

Edited by Frankthedm
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There is an OfficeTeam nearby, so I've signed up with them. Looks promising, but since I signed up over the weekend I won't know anything for probably at least a week. I've been applying for various jobs over CareerBuilder as well. I really should pick up the pace, I just hit all of the places that I knew would pay me enough first before going everywhere else.

 

The reason I've been limiting myself to just the Chicagoland area is because we've already signed a lease on an apartment, so we're kinda stuck (well, actually, I'm stuck, she's happy that she's so close to her old hometown...but that's another rant ::P: ).

 

But I do have good news (that's not about car insurance), my fiancee has an interview at our bank, she's actually at it now. With any luck, she'll be working in the call center.

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While I'm sure that a good education is important in findin some positions I honestly believe that your attitude and willingness to learn on the job has more to do with getting the position you want than a piece of paper does.

 

I've gotten every job I every went for, only worked in retail as a check out chick for 2 months when I was 17 and didn't finish highschool let alone go to Uni. I now work in IT as the manager of our Helpdesk, Training and Documentation departments for a locally owned globally renowned company.

 

If you want it bad enough you have to work for it. You can't just sit at school and then Uni for so many years, walk out and expect a job to land in your lap just because you have a piece of paper that says you can do it. Most employers are more interested in actual experience and ability than they are in paper.

 

How do you get experience without having been in that position before? By working up to it. Start in a call centre, prove you can do that, move into another area of the same company, prove you can do that job. Get noticed by the people who matter. Make it known that you're interested in a particular position and work hard to get there.

 

Good things come to those who work for them, not those who sit back and wait for them.

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My own experiences this year in my attempts at becoming perm at the IRS have been met with negligible results.

 

Now, remember, perm positions are a rarity where I work. Recently, however, there has been an influx with the Philly processing center preparing to close, and Austin being deemed worthy enough to not only stay open, but take over Philly's ops (mostly international stuff). I've put in over 30 (will be closer to 40 as of tomorrow when I fax in more) applications since the beginning of January in search for something perm. The one job I was offered (way back in Feb when I still had a lot of applications out and a more positive outlook) I declined because I didn't want to be in the position of cold calling taxpayers and telling them we were going to take their house if they didn't pay (the position was in Collections). Now I'm kicking myself, even though I would have hated the job, simply because out of all the other applications I've put in, I'm getting the interviews, but not being chosen.

 

What's even more frustrating is that people who have worse evals than I do, and their work history is nearly identical to mine (I have more in that I've been a Tax Examiner) are getting interviews for some jobs that I have not yet been called to interview on. I was told that I had to make the "best qualified" list. Now, if my annual is as perfect as it gets (all fives, with five being the highest possible rating and I know some of the people getting interviewed don't have all fives because they told me) and with an application that looks good (I've had the people in the Career Center look it over), I should be getting better responses.

 

I'm getting a lot of "you're qualified" letters. I'm getting interviews, and the interviews are going well as far as I can tell.

 

Yes, looking for a job is stressful, depressing, agonizing, and ego-destroying. I'm just hoping beyond all hope that something comes through. I've vowed to accept the next position I'm offered, even if it's lower pay, because then, at least, I'll work all year and won't have the Fear of Furlough Cloud hanging over my head (as it's currently doing).

 

:wacko::mellow::huh::down::blink::angry:::o::down: -- how I feel on a daily basis

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Enchantra, have you tried the local "for profit" universities (Univ of Phoenix, Community College, etc.)? My wife taught at Florida Metropolitan Univ. for several years. Paid real well for the time worked, and helped her get her foot in the door at a 'real' university.

 

Yeah I worked at one for all of 2003. Taught Spring, Summer and Fall classes. Got axed due to budget cuts since I was the low man on the totem pole. I've applied at every local college in the area, and either they aren't looking for an Anthropologist or they strictly want someone with a PhD which is why I've turned my focus out of the area and for the most part out of state.

 

Ary - That's what it is like working as an adjunct professor, you never know from semester to semester if you are going to be teaching or not, because if budget cuts do come through, you're the first to get axed because they won't go after "permanent part-timers" or "Tenured Professors."

 

I'm all for getting into a place I like and working my way up. I don't mind taking entry level positions and doing my best. I have an average of two promotions a year at my current job because I go beyond what I'm required to do and do more. My manager has already told me that when I leave he's going to have a hard time filling my position because he doesn't know of anyone who will do things the way I do them. I'll have been there five years this August 20th.

 

DA- Having never been to New Zealand I don't know how things work down there. But here in the States every year it seems to get increasingly harder for people without a High School diploma to get decent employment. Those who have a diploma and even degrees are also running into an increasingly competitive work environment. In some areas of the country there are a lot of jobs available which is why I've turned my focus in that direction. In other areas like where I am currently what openings there are at many places often have several hundred applicants simply because there isn't much available for work in the area. Rochester as a whole seems to be a dying city, hence why I'm looking outside the area. If I stay in Rochester I know my chances of finding anything are slim. I recently came across an article in one of the local papers that said that in the past five years the Rochester area has lost 150,000 people mainly to moving out of the area in search of work. I'm itching to join them.

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It was like that in one of the small country towns I spent a couple of years at in Australia too. A lot of people moving away looking for work, I don't know how they all went with that venture of course but I didn't have trouble getting a job there and I was an 'out of towner'.

 

Perhaps I've been lucky, I dunno, but even moving countries didn't hamper my ability to get the first job I applied for. Perhaps I'm just super employable! LOL

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Having never been to New Zealand I don't know how things work down there. But here in the States every year it seems to get increasingly harder for people without a High School diploma to get decent employment. Those who have a diploma and even degrees are also running into an increasingly competitive work environment. In some areas of the country there are a lot of jobs available which is why I've turned my focus in that direction. In other areas like where I am currently what openings there are at many places often have several hundred applicants simply because there isn't much available for work in the area.

 

A friend of mine who works as a head hunter out in San Fran seems to be looking the other direction. A lot of companies now are looking for people who aren't nescessarily educated but trainable. Following the hooplah of the late 90s where everyone and there brother got a degree in something or another, a lot of the HR people noticed that it was harder to teach them to fit into the coorporate machine compared to the old way of doing things. Now almost all the companies she is hiring for are not looking for degrees unless it is an engineering position.

 

Few years ago when I was hiring GSs and WGs for the USAF I had noticed the same thing. Someone with 0 expeirance and a college degree always caused more damage than good - generally never made it to their 60 day eval.

 

Granted that only applied for paper pushers and box lifters. Our technical staff always needed some level of training (though more often than not it wasn't a degree per se).

 

Anywho - timing and location probably are the biggest factors which will land you a job right now. A hard science background is a big bonus too. Almost everyone I talk to is hiring, however they also seem to be making the move out of the metros towards cheaper pastures. I know I got the job I have now in a little less than two weeks after moving up here from Florida and I am making good money to boot (almost three times the local average).

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