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Wet Palettes?


Dane
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they have these "wet palettes" at AC Moore. it's a tray with a sheet of sponge, then a piece of paper laid over that. Supposedly keeps paint fresh a long time. Anyone use one of these? Opinions?

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I use one all the time...wouldn't paint without it now. I can't sing it's praises enough.

Believe me...my painting took a great leap forward once I started using it. I use Reynold's baking paper instead of the paper the manufacturer provides.

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I tried a home-made wet pallet, but didn't like it. My paint seemd to spread out and get a kind of skin on top of it. I like the little wells on my porsilin pallets lots better.

 

That said, I live in an area with high humidity, so my paint drying out while I work with it is not a big problem. I have also discovered a way to keep the paint on my pallet in between painting sessions if I want. I add some extra water to the paint, cover the pallet with a damp paper towel, put the whole thing in a plastic bag and into the 'fridge. This will keep the paint usable for several days.

 

If I ever found a wet pallet with wells, I would give it a try though!

 

Give a wet pallet a try you may like it- most people do- I'm just weird. :lol:

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I've also fashioned my own wet pallet. After trying many different types of containers I settled on a shallow four sectioned container that I found in a Japanese $.99 store (Maruki?). I believe it was originally supposed to be a lunch box container or ?

 

It has two latches that secure the lid at the sides, although it is by no means airtight.

 

I do use sponges that are ment to be replacement wet-pallette sponges (they are thin, about 1/4" thick, and you get two or three fairly large sheets...it'll last me a lifetime I'm sure). I cut the sponges to fit the wells (wet the sponges first as they'll expand) and I use baking vellum/paper as the pallette surface.

 

post-896-1150812324_thumb.jpg

EIDT:one compartment w/o paper pallette surface. paint is 4-5 days old

 

I have a question regarding wet pallettes too...

 

A) How damp to keep the sponge? In order to keep the paper from drying out and curling at the edges during a paint session I keep the sponge pretty drenched...the paper literally floats over the sponge. Is that too much water? How are others keeping the edges from curling?

 

2) When I open the pallette the next day, the paint seems much more diluted (great for washes and thin applications). I've always had this so I'm thinking that it is normal...how is everyone else's paint consistency the next day?

 

Thanks

AWhang

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To answer your question Awong...supersaturate the sponge until water covers it...then pour off the excess. Any less water than that will cause the paper's edges to start drying and curling up.

 

I never use the pallette to store unused paint.so I never run into that problem. I tend to mix up only what I will need to cover the area I intend to use the color on.

 

Dane...I wouldn't think a wet pallette would be necessary for a wash..it was more intended to keep normal consistency paints workable longer and is great if you do wet on wet for blending.

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I use a wet palette now and love it. The first one I tried was really sucky though. I went to Michael's and bought all the stuff they have there for wet palettes, they have a spongy material for the bottom, a sealable case, and some paper to put on top. The paper was terrible, all of the water would just leech through the paper into the sponge leaving super thick paint. Then, little fibers from the paper would come off and attach themselves to my brush, leaving interesting textures on the mini. By interesting, I mean ugly and really freaking annoying. ;) I think (hope) that Michael's set up was for water colors or some other kind of paint than acrylics for mini painters.

 

I had a local painter (who sometimes posts here) show me his wet palette set up. It's cheap and works great. I got an 8" X 12" shallow aluminum cake pan, a paper-based washable (but disposable) dish towel, and wax paper. Makes a great, large wet palette that works perfectly for me. I especially like the large surface area. I've seen people use blisters from mini packs as wet palettes, but those are way too small for me.

 

I don't worry about covering it when I'm not using it, I just throw away the paper, re-soak the sponge, and put a new sheet of paper on it. I found that if you seal the palette you have to be very careful of mold, so I don't worry about trying to keep paint workable for days at a time any more.

 

It's rare that I am able to paint for more than 4 hours at a time, so it works great for me. After a couple of hours I might have to add another drop of water, but generally it's great.

 

Awong, I don't have a problem with the edges curling because I cut the size of the paper longer than the width of the sponge and fold it over. That way none of the sponge has direct contact with the air, and it stays pretty moist.

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Awong, I don't have a problem with the edges curling because I cut the size of the paper longer than the width of the sponge and fold it over. That way none of the sponge has direct contact with the air, and it stays pretty moist.

 

That's a good solution. I'll have to give it a try!

Thanks

AWhang

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how often do you have to rewet the sponge while painting??

 

the homemade stuff sounds interesting but I found some on dick blick & that & this discussion make me want to try a wet pallet out. Paint & water dry up fast in my climate as it's pretty dry & hot here alot, so this may really work for me.

 

this is the brand I was thinkin about going with, not sure which one I want so I'm still deciding on that part. ha ha

 

http://www.dickblick.com/zz030/13/

 

RM

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how often do you have to rewet the sponge while painting??

 

I usually squirt some water in once every two or three days. I use a syringe or pipette and pump in enough to drench the sponge.

 

AWhang

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That's the exact brand and model I was looking at as well. I'm not sure I really need one though. Maybe I'll invest in a ceramic one instead. My main complaint with my 69 cent plactic one is that now it's all scratched up (from cleaning) and holds paint in the scratches.

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I've been using the Masterson's Wet Palette for over 3 years...really like them...Have 2 of them...

 

I have this one

 

http://www.dickblick.com/zz030/20a/

 

and for traveling...when travelling I would recommend a leak proof Zip lock bag...

 

http://www.dickblick.com/zz030/08/

 

I also soak my sponge and then pour off any excess water...add a bit of ammonia if you start having a mildew problem...

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