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A little lioness


Elouchard
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Hi all,

 

Most of the Reaper figs I have painted recently have been gaming quality so I didn't want to show them off much. This one is more of a collector level but is a Confrontation mini, the Red Lioness, and I know I really need to finish up a Reaper one soon. She is pretty infamous for having a ridiculous amount of fillagree and stick-like limbs that break easily. I just went by the box colors but tweaked a couple of things. There was a good deal of Reaper MSP used on the leather and clothing but mostly it was Vallejo GC scurfolous brown mixed with white for the gold and a couple of reds + red ink for the armor. A good tip for the fillagree is to paint the armor completely with light colors first and then glaze down with darker shades. The dark shade will pool around the fillagree, making it shadowed without having to blackline. Then highlight the fillagree up with the golds up to almost pure white. The deep red here looks almost black when it is right next to the light gold highlights, without having to try and paint fine black lines. The rest is pretty basic as I just wanted to get it done after all the fillagree. There are a bunch of things I can see wrong in the photos but sometimes one has to know when to stop and move onto the next project. If I can think of anything else interesting I'll add to the post.

 

edit: The trouble with shooitng photos with my setup is glare can really mess things us. I use a filtered desk lamp with a regular bulb for diffuse light on one side and a halogen gooseneck for direct light to the front. This works great when things are dull-coted as it makes nice shadows but has enough light to get good color saturation. The problem is if the paint has a hint of gloss and I move the lamp too close. Then it washes out the whites and adds glare noise to the semi-gloss bits. The new shots have the halogen lamp set back further and at a different angle to minimize the gloss glare. It seems to look better now with the new lighting, and a more neutral background, which doesn't hide the light blues in the horse as much. Anyhow, just me thinking out load. Maybe this will help someone or maybe not.

 

Eric

 

lioness1.jpg

 

lioness2.jpg

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ok...first, excelent job on this figure.

 

Crit time...I think that the mane and tail are really lacking in comparison to the work on the rest of this mini. The armor and flesh tones on both the rider and the mount are absoloutly stunning. The mane and tail look like it got inked and that was pretty much it.

 

Keep up the good work.

 

Todd

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Nice work, Eric! The warm and cold whites in the horse work well. Thanks for explaining how you used the MSPs and other paints to get a result resembling the studio scheme. Thanks, too, for the tip about lining the filigree through washes.

 

I'm no expert on photography, but I think I've heard that using different types of bulbs -- halogen, incandescent, daylight fluorescent -- in one photo setup will throw off the white-balance. I don't know whether that would lead to glare or overexposure, but it might at least change the colors a bit. On the advice of Anne and others, I set up my photo area to include three daylight-fluorescent bulbs, and cheap white satin taped over each bulb to diffuse the light, and it seems to give me good results.

 

Derek

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That red really POPS! Good shading and highlighting on it. The yellow goes great with it as well. The horse's skin looks good, but the main does look a bit off. I'm not sure how to fix that though...

The sword could use just a bit of shadow to make it look a little more steel.

That is a great paintjob... wow... amazing work.

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Nice work, Eric! The warm and cold whites in the horse work well. Thanks for explaining how you used the MSPs and other paints to get a result resembling the studio scheme. Thanks, too, for the tip about lining the filigree through washes.

 

I'm no expert on photography, but I think I've heard that using different types of bulbs -- halogen, incandescent, daylight fluorescent -- in one photo setup will throw off the white-balance. I don't know whether that would lead to glare or overexposure, but it might at least change the colors a bit. On the advice of Anne and others, I set up my photo area to include three daylight-fluorescent bulbs, and cheap white satin taped over each bulb to diffuse the light, and it seems to give me good results.

 

Derek

 

 

Thanks Derek. I try to put something useful on the posts, even though its real basic. Not like you would need to hear about those tips though. :)

 

The halogen bulb adds alot of red, which is not really a problem as I just use the incandescent setting on the digital camera and sometimes tweak the cokor balance in photoshop. I used to use multiple desk lamps with diffusers (tissue paper) but now I only use the one. The halogen gives me nice brightness and makes good shadows but I pay the price in reflections.

 

As for the horse hair. It didn't have any washes yet, but I already too care of that. I still nned to take a new photo, or maybe I'll just move on to something else. For commissions, sometimes if it looks good enough in the photo in hand, then thats's all one needs. I almost always touch up figures after the photos as they help me find mistakes.

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I love the armor too- just beautiful- and thanks for the tip about glazing filigree (I would be the one hand lining all of it with dark brown liner).

 

I love your browns on the saddle and cloth!

Do you mind sharing your recipe? Are they MSP's?

 

~Jenna

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I love the armor too- just beautiful- and thanks for the tip about glazing filigree (I would be the one hand lining all of it with dark brown liner).

 

I love your browns on the saddle and cloth!

Do you mind sharing your recipe? Are they MSP's?

 

~Jenna

 

 

Hi Jenna!

 

All of the straps and saddle are MSP oiled leather, which has a tinge of yellow. I mixed in liquitex Burnt Umber to shade it down on the saddle and added Adikolor Leather for the cloth. I'm sure I could have used any burnt sienna for that part as I just wanted a red tinge. It worked out better on the standing version. The highlights were then pure MSP oiled leather again. The straps have that + white.

 

The colors I like for MSP are green ochre, faded khaki, palomino gold, golden highlight, and oiled leather. The main reason is that they apply very smooth for clothing and have slightly different muted shades of reds, greens and yellows.

 

Eric

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