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Flesh wash


TKD
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I have been using GW Flesh Wash for a while, but I have to admit I am unsatisfied with how it works on its target color - flesh. It makes it too dark for my tastes, no matter how much I thin it or if I magic wash it. It makes a great darkener for when Brown or Black just will not get me the results I want (dirtying up skeletons is a good example, or aging bronze/copper weapons).

 

But I did notice Reaper has a much lighter-looking Flesh Shading Ink. How is it? Specifically, how does it compare to GW Flesh Wash in terms of color? I am sure people here have used both, so is the Reaper ink lighter or is it the same bronzing wash as the GW stuff?

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I have Reaper's flesh wash but have yet to use it (for various reasons). I personally prefer GW's Flesh Wash, but I don't use it straight; instead I use it to darken a wash of straight flesh. It cuts down on the "ruddyness" of the Flesh wash, while still maintaining the shade in the crevices. Also I can get it to fade beautifully using my wash technique (multiple washes at different strengths and mixes, thinly applied, mixed with a little extender).

 

Damon.

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Here is my two cents on this one.

I use craft paints form the local craft store.  I find that for washes on flesh, a brown works just fine.  If the wash you are using by GW is that dark I would suggest lightening it with another color, or mix your own.  Inks are not that hard to create and neither are washes.  I have several squeeze bottles filled with premade washes and inks.  In one bottle I put into it roughly one part paint, one part water and two parts folk art extender.  Seems to work well for a thicker ink, to thin it just add another part water and another part extender.  Thin it enough and it becomes a wash instead of an ink.

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Thin it enough and it becomes a wash instead of an ink.

Sounds good, but I often use inks undilited for glazes - will that work with extender and paint?

I see no reason why paint and extender would not make a good glaze.  Just have to experiment a bit with the misture of paint to extender and see what works best.

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Future Acrylic Floorwax is your friend.

I use a generic - but I did say I've used "magic wash" techniques in the first post.

 

Really, folks, I want to know how Reaper's Flesh Wash Ink Compares to GWs. I may end up mixing my own ink (thanks Enchantra) but I still want to know how they compare.

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Love the Flesh wash myself -- the ONLY GW paint that I use, frankly.  While I have Reaper's version, it's still waiting to get used...but I accidentally used some Wood Shading Ink on a dwarven face last week, and I love the result.  Very dark shadows; I didn't even bother painting the eyes, because the eye sockets were so perfectly shaded.

 

You've reminded me, though.  Tonight, after the Matirx, I'll basecoat a few guys in flesh color, and then play around with washes after work tomorrow.

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Future Acrylic Floorwax is your friend.

I use a generic - but I did say I've used "magic wash" techniques in the first post.

 

Really, folks, I want to know how Reaper's Flesh Wash Ink Compares to GWs. I may end up mixing my own ink (thanks Enchantra) but I still want to know how they compare.

Here is my suggestion:

 

Like all Reaper washes, the Reaper flesh wash leave a light shine.  What I do is apply a thin coat at first, and sometimes I water it down slightly to make sure the wash is not too dark.  What I use is a clear plastic 25 count card holder as my palette to mix the wash and the water to get my desired tint.  Of course the flesh wash will darken the base flesh

tone, but I use the flesh wash primarily for the valleys and highlight the peaks with another color.

 

Comparing GW and Reaper flesh colors, in general:

 

GW: cartoony, animated look

Reaper: more natural when highlighting isn't overused.

 

After working with both, I far prefer Reaper's flesh wash over GW's.  Both are different to work with.  You just need to get used to both and see where iti leads you.

 

If you are interest, email me, and I'll send you a few pics of the Alyscia of the Forest I painted.

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Hmmm...as I suspected - the GW stuff is a bit orange and cartoony. That is a good description. Though, as I said, it makes a brilliant "aging" glazing for my skeletons. Prime 'em white, wash them heavily with GW Flesh Wash, and then highlight successively with lighter whites.

 

I tried using some Vallejo "Smoke" transparant for flesh yesterday; it is indeed a bit smoky but pretty good. I tried some Reaper Wood Shading Ink as well, but that came out a little too brown for the figure I was using. Still nice though.

 

Anyway, I think I will pick up some Reaper Flesh Ink today when I go out to the gaming store. Thanks for the comparisons, folks. I was worried I would be picking up something identical to the GW stuff, and I have enough for what I use it for.

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Note that Reaper's Flesh Ink is actually pretty green.  That's obviously more realistic, but it's a little bit of a surprise at first.

You know, what's kind of odd is that my buddy Steve bought a container of Reaper's flesh wash that was rather green.  When I bought it and when he re-bought it, it was brown, a few shades lighter than the wood shade ink.  Green = bad mixture maybe?  Hmmmmmm......

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