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Simple green


Naterstein
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Hey all,

 

Using Simple Green at about 2:1 with water as stripper for Tamiya primer. When I scrub off the Tamiya (going on 36hrs of soaking and its not coming off easy) the metal underneath looks darker. I can rub it with a edge of my sculpting tool and it seems to get shinier, but overall the metal seems a dark grey now.

 

Anyone else have this issue? Is it okay to leave it and prime over it?

 

 

I cant imagine being able to polish the entire mini with a sculpting tool, some spots just wont get reached.

 

Thanks.

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I wonder how dark that mini that I have in the jar of simple green is now. I think it's getting close to two years that it's been in there now.

 

I don't bother stripping minis anymore.

 

Two years?! Are you're kidding?! Is the mini even still there?

 

And out of curiosity, why don't you strip them? What do you to do fix them? I know some mistakes and errors can be fixed, but sometimes, for me at least, things go so wrong that there really isn't any other choice.

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I have the same problem when I use simple green or mean green (basically the same product), but I don't worry about the metal getting darker cause once it's covered with paint it won't matter as long as my paint job comes out the way that I want it to.

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Two years?! Are you're kidding?! Is the mini even still there?

Yep, I can still see it in the sludge.

 

And out of curiosity, why don't you strip them? What do you to do fix them? I know some mistakes and errors can be fixed, but sometimes, for me at least, things go so wrong that there really isn't any other choice.

It's not worth the time it takes me to strip, clean, and re-prime them. If I really want to paint that particular figure, I buy a new one.

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And out of curiosity, why don't you strip them? What do you to do fix them? I know some mistakes and errors can be fixed, but sometimes, for me at least, things go so wrong that there really isn't any other choice.

It's not worth the time it takes me to strip, clean, and re-prime them. If I really want to paint that particular figure, I buy a new one.

 

For me, it would take less time and aggravation to strip and clean the mini (before re-priming) than to clean all the mold lines off of another figure. Do you have the express mold line remover or just get lucky picking the figures?

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For me, it would take less time and aggravation to strip and clean the mini (before re-priming) than to clean all the mold lines off of another figure. Do you have the express mold line remover or just get lucky picking the figures?

 

No and no. I just find it easier to clean the mold lines than to try to get every last bit of paint/primer off of a figure that's been stripped. Paint gets stuck in the cracks and just doesn't want to come out.

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It's not worth the time it takes me to strip, clean, and re-prime them. If I really want to paint that particular figure, I buy a new one.

 

So....what do you do with the old ones? Cause if you're not doing anything them, you could always send them my way. :;): I'd be happy to strip, re-prime and paint them.

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Diluted or not, even the concentrated version of Simple Green has water in it. But that's not a problem because moisture, specifically water, doesn't corrode lead. Unless acetic acid -- vinegar -- and carbon dioxide are present in a concentrated form, and a bit of heat applied to accelerate the process, lead won't form lead carbonate, or 'rot'. Common sources of acetic acid are certain woods, paper products, cardboard and styrofoam. Some lacquer and acrylic paints may also make the list. If unpainted lead is trapped with these materials in a storage box or display case, without benefit of air movement to clear out the carbon dioxide and acetic acid, lead rot could occur and become a self-sustaining process. Once started, it can be stopped by cleaning throughly to remove the affected metal, and removal from the caustic environment.

 

In other words, one would almost have to work at creating the right environment for lead rot to exist. Leaving a lead-based mini in Simple Green or other 'underwater' environment will not cause it to decay. Rinse well after soaking in your paint remover of choice and you won't have a problem.

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flynn, throwing metal in the trash is not OK, especially metal with traces of lead. I'm serious about this.

 

Also seriously but in a totally different way, just put them all in a box instead. There are plenty of folks who love miniatures and can't afford many who would a) be very pleased to get them unpackaged and in as-is condition and/or b) pay you for them.

 

Personally, I LIKE cleaning and "restoring" miniatures. Please, flynn, please stop... please. Someone wants them.

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