Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
CYCLOPS

Figure prep - How do I remove........

Recommended Posts

I just got my figures in today and I can't wait to start painting! What sort of techinques can I use to remove the casting lines and excess material on the figures? Files, sandpaper, etc?

 

I'm impressed with the Reaper miniatures as they look very clean but want to remove some of the casting lines. Any helpful tips?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you may be able to remove many of them with a simple exacto knife. For other problems you may need to pick up a couple of small files.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a couple techniques I use, one is probably not recomended. :lol:

 

I use small files of diffferent shapes depending on the part that needs mold lines removed or I've been known to just use a hobby knife. The hobby knife is the technigue that is probably not recomended. I have some mildly scarred thumbs from using that one and it's easy to take too much metal off.

 

There's no real hard and fast rules. Heck. I've even used my dremel for really extreme problems like on the Panther CAV and the shoulders of a Rhino.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The simplest method is to take a hobby (X-Acto) knife and use it to scrape off the unwanted pewter by holding the blade perpendicular to the mold line and then drawing the blade towards you. As Spartan6 says, using an X-Acto knife does entail some peril (but, as long as you are slow, careful, and use the blade to scrape the pewter perpendicularly rather than cut, you should be fine).

 

I personally like using diamond coated needle files from Micro-Mark (220 grit). I also have a set of small hobby files, but the diamond coated files are much better.

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever you do, TAKE THE TIME TO DO IT RIGHT!!! Nothing is worse than getting into the actual painting and seeing some unsightly mold line that you could have removed but failed to due to overenthusiasm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Additionally, I would suggest following the mold line all the way through the model. This way you know you're getting the whole thing... And I concur, take your time. I like to prep 4-5 models at once and really deticate myself to doing the job right.

 

 

SK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the files method myself. Smaller files are helpful if you can get them. The most commonly used file is the one that's flat on one side and a half circle on the other, and the round file. After I do the filing I'll sometimes buff the figure with fine sandpaper or a dremel polish tool just to smooth out the finish.

 

Stern's tip of following the line all the way around in a good one. If you're having trouble finding the start of the line, it's usually easy to spot from the base. Fine mould lines are easy to miss until you get paint on. For that reason, I also find it helpful to have a bottle of brush on primer, so if I spot something that I missed I'll file it down and then touch up the primer, but you probably don't need to be that fanatical unless you're painting for display or a contest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I start by giving the mini a good wash with black ink. This makes all the details - including those nasty mold lines- pop out. It also cuts the shine on the mini which makes the details easier to see. This reduces the now- that-I-have-the-primer-on-I-can-see-lots-of-stuff-I-missed frustrations.

Then I go in with a nice sharp X-Acto knife and get the larger lines and finish it up with diamond coated needle files from Micro Mark.

As a last step, I use Green Stuff to fill in any gaps or pits in the mini surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a little brace of silversmithing files... actually they are my wife's, but she never uses them. There are two files I recommend (but a brace with 4 or 5 is cool to have) :

 

A tapered roundback. This is flat on one face, curved on the other face, and tapers to a point, giving you the right curve and width file for pretty much anything.

 

A tapered or "rat tail" round file. This one is a lot like a skewer, it's a cylinder that tapers to a point. It's good for getting in here and there to jab out slight flashing and file armpits, groins, and other difficult mold lines.

 

Failing all else, and if like me you live miles from civilisation, a spark-plug file or other small industiral file will work OK.

 

The final and most important tool is a razor sharp hobby-knife with a sturdy grip and which holds blades securely (ie not a bargain-shop chinese piece of junk), and plenty of spare blades. Dulled blades are not useless; they're good for scraping, pushing putty, and applying epoxy glue. Fresh blades will take the tip off your finger with ease, treat them with respect and moderate fear. Used carefully, the hobby knife is your best friend. Use it incorrectly and it will snap, firing shards of brittle, hard steel into your soft, wet eyeball.

 

Last tip: try not to leave an obvious flat spot when you're done filing a line down. Move the file like you were sculpting the surface you're working on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Used carefully, the hobby knife is your best friend. Use it incorrectly and it will snap, firing shards of brittle, hard steel into your soft, wet eyeball.

 

HAHAHAhahahahaaa....wheeee....

 

It really isn't funny...it's completely true. And tragic when such things happen. But that wording just makes me laugh. Reminds me a bit of the pirate with the fork in his wooden eyeball from Pirates of the Carribean.

 

Back on track with the thread, I almost exclusively use an x-acto. I use it in a similar fashion to a wood plane, with the blade nearly perpindicular to the surface...this produces a fairly smooth scrape.

 

For those really big mold lines, I will actually put the knife against the low corner of the mold line and cut, bringing the two surfaces to a much smoother level. I don't know if that sentence made any sense at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...