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mrgunn

Pantone Equivilencies?

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Hmmm...this is not possible for a couple of reasons. One, it would take me 10-20 solid hours to do it (at least!) and to be honest, I don't have enough hours in the day to do all I need to as it is. ::): Two, putting the Pantones up online means that anyone in the world--including competing paint lines--gains the ability to easily match my colors. If they're going to rip off MSP equivalents, I would rather make them *work* for it. :;):

 

Why do you need the pantones? And whyever would you need *all* of them?

 

--Anne

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I'd be surprised if you could find exact matches anyway. The difference in mediums alone would account for big differences. Certainly the triads would present tints of original colors.

 

Wow, if you could do that in 20 hours I'd be very impressed!

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Dear Anne:

 

No neferious activity here, I just needed help with my spread sheet with color swatches so I could keep track of which ones I had and which ones I needed. I am missing swatches 9163 - 9216 and wanted to put them in my spread sheet.

 

Why do you need the pantones? And whyever would you need *all* of them?

--Anne

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Check the stickied thread at the top of this subforum for a PDF containing all colors.

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Flynn:

 

I have the .PDF, but it won't fit in my spread sheet.

 

Check the stickied thread at the top of this subforum for a PDF containing all colors.

 

Thanks,

 

mRgUnN

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Hmmm...isn't there a way to open the .PDF in an image editing program such as Photoshop, and thus get the CMYK/RGB values off of it there?

 

--Anne

p.s. Matt, if you'd had to figure CMYK's for all these colors you would have a crazy color-brain too. I can now look at a paint color and usually guess within one or two hits what the CMYK values should be. As far as I can tell, there is so real-world use for this ability. The paint line designing has left me mutated. :;): Still, I'd have to learn Pantone's scale, so maybe 20 hours is unrealistic! :lol:

 

Flynn:

 

I have the .PDF, but it won't fit in my spread sheet.

 

Check the stickied thread at the top of this subforum for a PDF containing all colors.

 

Thanks,

 

mRgUnN

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Yes, you can open it in Photoshop and use the eyedropper tool, it will then give you CMYK and RGB (and hex) values. However, in creating the pdf there may have been a conversion between RGB and CMYK, as well as a lossy compression scheme- so those colors are not EXACTLY accurate. Also, Pantone inks exist because they allow printing of colors outside the CMYK gamut- so sampling them like this will defeat the purpose, and the resulting colors will be muted and in some cases highly inaccurate.

 

Anne- that's one HELL of a color eye you have! I can go to the hardware store and pick out paint that matches a wall without bringing a sample, but nailing the CMYK values is amazing.

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Dear Anne:

 

Ahh good ol ignorance, ;) I guess, I really wanted the CMYK/RGB values not the pantone equivilencies. I do not have photo shop or any other equivilent paint program, other than MS Paint that came with the OS.

 

 

Hmmm...isn't there a way to open the .PDF in an image editing program such as Photoshop, and thus get the CMYK/RGB values off of it there?

 

Thanks for the help so far.

 

 

Thanks,

 

mRgUnN

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Hmmm, so what you want to do is to create a custom color in Excel? Interesting... can you then use Excel to mix colors and get a good idea of what they will look like?

 

You could create a table that adds 10% of a color each row and end up with a blended stripe. It would give an idea of how much you will need to add to get the color you want.

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GIMP for Windows, the "free" graphic manipulation package that is somewhat equivalent to Photoshop, should have an eye dropper tool that will pick up color values.

 

I don't know if it can open PDFs though.

 

PaintByNumbers, Excel does not allow you to create custom colors by RGB value.

 

One of the problems with doing anything by CMYK or RGB is that you will run into color matching problems both on the computer (different displays show colors slightly differently) as well as in print (different printers print colors differently).

 

One of the easiest things to do would be to print out the white background version of the PDF and then just cross out the ones that you have. ::):

 

Ron

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One of the problems with doing anything by CMYK or RGB is that you will run into color matching problems both on the computer (different displays show colors slightly differently) as well as in print (different printers print colors differently).

Yup. I tried the Photoshop thing, and was coming up with most colors having one or more of the CMYK values in the single digits. The margin of error with this technique is really an unknown.... There's also the issue of displaying CMYK on an RGB monitor. When you switch from RGB to CMYK in Photoshop, there's a definitely noticable color change.

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Although this has nothing to do with RMS paints, can someone explain exactly how the RGB system would work in custom mixing paints? Is it displayed as a percentage, and you just mix up the colors appropriately?

 

Damon.

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Although this has nothing to do with RMS paints, can someone explain exactly how the RGB system would work in custom mixing paints? Is it displayed as a percentage, and you just mix up the colors appropriately?

 

I don't see how using RGB would work with mixing paints, particularly since with the RGB system, you're looking at an additive color system rather than a subtractive color system which is used with paints.

 

RGB colors are expressed as 3 numeric values from 0 to 255. Black is 0, 0, 0 while White is 255, 255, 255. Solid red is 255, 0, 0, and so on.

 

The representations on the PDFs should be though of as representations of the color, not exact matches of what you'd get if you paint the color on a primed mini. For example, the Walnut Brown on the PDF is a much lighter color than the actual Walnut Brown (a lovely black with a brown tint).

 

Again, color matching from screen to screen is hard. Exact color matching from screen to print is very hard. You can buy expensive monitors which are supposed to be very good at presenting colors properly and even systems designed to calibrate monitors to exact colors The Pantone system is designed to help with the matching from screen to print (and print to print originally).

 

Ron

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There are also calibration devices that can be used to make sure that what you see on screen matches the output from your printer. They're generally pretty expensive, last time I looked (years ago).

 

Also, what you get on the printout is influenced by what kind of paper you're using, which inks you're using, and what kind of varnish you put on the finished cover, if you're doing varnishes... different papers and esp. varishes have different levels of light reflectance/transmittance, which affect what you see vs. what you thought you were going to see!

 

When I temped for a print company, one customer rejected a proof because what they saw in print didn't match what they wanted. Turned out they hadn't calibrated their monitor recently... and they had their program set to RGB rather than CMYK... the company sent someone over with the Pantone book, found out exactly which colors they wanted, and came back and edited the file... when they got the file back, they complained that it "didn't look right" on screen! :wacko:

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