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Primer and ink


Swanson
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For some time now I have been experimenting with applying a black wash over a white primmed Fig to enhance the details of the model. All I get is a stained grey model . I have also tried sealing the fig with "Future wax", GW matt sealer ,Testors Dull Coat and white paint between the coats ,all with the same results. Any advice on this would be appreciated.

Thx in advance ,

Ken

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For some time now I have been experimenting with applying a black wash over a white primmed Fig to enhance the details of the model. All I get is a stained grey model . I have also tried sealing the fig with "Future wax", GW matt sealer ,Testors Dull Coat and white paint between the coats ,all with the same results. Any advice on this would be appreciated.

Thx in advance ,

Ken

What kind of wash have you used ?

 

If your using black ink it might be an issue.

 

Take some 'magic wash' (10 parts H2O and 1 part future floor wax) and add enough black paint to get a nice wash. Put that on and see what it does.

 

I'm guessing your wash isn't thin enough and doesn't have any surface tension remover - so it's just muddying up everything.

 

My 2 cents. Hopefully it'll help.

 

I would have said it had to do with your primer, but if you've sealed the primer before washing it... the only other thought would be to let the whole thing dry 24 hours after priming and again after sealing.

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I believe Future isn't recommended any more. Instead use a matte varnish or a glaze medium. I use the craft glaze medium because I can get 4 ounces of the stuff for about a buck and a half. That mix is 3:3:1 for glaze medium/varnish : water : paint/liner.

 

Note - the paint mix will be darker than the liner stuff. Adjust as you like.

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I've seen a few people use Pro Paint Walnut or any very dark brown as their wash. Looks a bit better than black.

 

Or use one of the liners from the MSP line that are very well suited to doing washes. I use mostly the Brown Liner, but I've also used the Blue Liner recently.

 

Ron

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Just as another suggestion I would not seal the model right after a primer has touched it. I would apply the base coats and use the inks as the others have suggested and then apply a very light coat of testers dull coat. Be patient when painting over the dull coat because paint will sometimes come off when painting on top of it.

 

Or you could just wait till the very end and then use dull coat but that is a matter of personal taste. Any who this is my 2 cents

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This is a great technique for monsters. Use black for cool colors, and dark brown for warm colors. However, if you can't get black to work, you won't get brown to work either.

 

I think your problem is water tension. I started off just using some dirty paint thinner from my enamel days. Now I use a mix of water, Winsor & Newton Acrylic Flow Improver, and some Slo-Dri. Just get it thin, and don't bother sealing the primer. It will stay darken your white somewhat, but when you get it thin enough with the right mix it will work well to darken the crevices.

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