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I've been using some stuff I got from the dollar store near me. It's called L.A.'s Totally Awesome Orange All Purpose Degreaser. Costs about a buck a bottle, and works on metal, plastic, and resin (be careful with resin though, it softens in this stuff slightly, but when dry, it hardens again). 50/50 with water will strip primer and paint in a 12-hour soak, though I usually do 24 to make sure I can get the primer out of the details as well. Just soak, then toothbrush clean. Works great.

 

Image attached of the bottle, though it's small.

post-6591-12824780048918.jpg

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If brake fluid didn't work, I got nothin'. I usually get good results with Simple Green...

Just signed on to post about this! You don't need the brass brush, you can use the steel ones. I use both the flat and 'cup shapped' styles, and have not hurt a METAL mini yet, including some Grenadi

I've never heard of a problem using acetone with lead and I did find a statement from someone claiming to be a chemist who said that acetone won't react with elemental metals.   That said, acetone i

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I've used SuperClean and love it. I used to swear by Simple Green, but have now switched to SuperClean. I've had it do very well with metals and plastics. It will dry out your hands rather quickly if you're not wearing gloves, though.

 

Mark

 

Just a heads up for anyone interested. I know some of you use super clean for stripping minis. Every Wal-Mart around here has Super Clean on clearance right now, so it's likely on clearance at all the stores. Might be worth checking if you use it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Today I tried to strip a few minis while at work, since we had a huge container of Acetone and I saw it on the list here. I didn't see anyone commenting on it for metal minis so hopefully this will help someone in the future. :)

 

First of all, Acetone shouldn't ever be used for plastic. This was mentioned up thread, but just to emphasise: it will completely melt the surface of anything plastic. My metal minis were superglued to primed plastic bases and they look like.. lava. It's kind of neat looking but they're also really flexible and the edges are goop.

 

As for how long to soak I expected a few hours like people are suggesting for other chemicals. However, when I placed the first mini in I saw the Acetone growing cloudy immediately. After about 5 minutes I pulled her out and scrubbed her under the faucet with a tooth brush. The paint and primer came right off easily, though in the details there were a few little specs left (a better brush would probably get them out, through.)

 

Oh and if you don't want your skin to get chalky and dried, gloves are recommended. <3

 

In conclusion, I've never used any other stripping material but I can't imagine anything else being better. (Unless you have a plastic mini or some conversion stuff) It literally took 10 minutes total to get all three minis completely cleaned up. They look brand new. :)

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  • 5 months later...

I didn't see it listed, but I've used something called Un-Cure, which is intended to loosen up superglue type adhesives. The brand I have is made by BSI Inc. (http://www.bsi-inc.com/Pages/hobby/accel.html - scroll down to the bottom of the page) As a paint stripper, it can be a bit expensive. I keep a glass jar and just empty the bottle of Un-Cure into it, but do need to note that it becomes less effective each time you use it. Do NOT use this on plastic! Metal only!

 

As to the question about Goof-Off, there are products out there with similar names. Goof-Off is one, Goo-Gone is another. They are very different. I know someone who uses Goof-Off to remove wax residue from Ukrainian Easter eggs, and it wipes clean with no residue. I tried Goo-Gone for the same process, and it removed the dye and left an oily residue behind.

 

I have not tried either as a paint stripper, but have something hand to test it on. Just tested Goof-Off and it worked well. I used a Q-tip to rub off some stubborn paint that survived my other attempts. (Un-Cure and brake fluid) Will try soaking the mini in it next.

 

~M

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  • 1 year later...

Cound me in as someone who has used Simple Green full-strength for stripping - both metal & plastic minis (some Reaper, mostly GW WHFantasy).

 

I preferred it to brake fluid as I was living in a rental TH then an apartment, with 3 cats & a dog then a young child around, and didn't want to risk a caustic fluid. It also smelled decent.

 

I recall that the glue holding the models together generally came off as well as the paint, but depending on how many coats had been done in the first place, I want to say 15min-4hrs took care of everything, with minimal scrubbing before/during a water rinse.

 

Of course, this was back in 04-06, so I see there's plenty more enviro-friendly options out now, I may have to try depending on how many of my Reaper Pro Paint models have to be re-done after moves & battle damage.

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I've been using some stuff I got from the dollar store near me. It's called L.A.'s Totally Awesome Orange All Purpose Degreaser. Costs about a buck a bottle, and works on metal, plastic, and resin (be careful with resin though, it softens in this stuff slightly, but when dry, it hardens again). 50/50 with water will strip primer and paint in a 12-hour soak, though I usually do 24 to make sure I can get the primer out of the details as well. Just soak, then toothbrush clean. Works great.

 

Image attached of the bottle, though it's small.

 

 

Just a not on this stuff... My mom, who is 75, was using this to clean something in the sink and passed out from the fumes! Be carefull when working with this stuff!

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  • 5 months later...

Best thing I've used is full blown acetone nail polish remover for metal figs, and non-acetone for plastic. I don't even soak them. Just dip, scrub, rinse and repeat. Never tried stripping a resin or GW finecast with it though.

 

Here's my question though...I jacked up one of my new Bones minis, and was thinking of stripping it. Has anyone tried stripping a Bones mini yet, and if so, with what?

 

(And yes, I know the easiest solution would be to just go buy a new one. I'm actually looking at this as something of an experiment.)

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Is it important to strip a painted plastic mini of paint before repainting it? If just want to make a couple of small additions to a plainted plastic mini, can I leave the old paint on and just wash and dry it before painting on it?

Sure you can, but remember that the minis original paintjob isn't like the acrylic paint you'll be using.
  • Prepainted minis often have a LOT of detail buried beneath a millimeter or two of plastic like paint.
  • Plastic like paint "might" not take thinned paints or washes as well as a primed surface..
  • Those touch ups will be just as vulnerable as any normal paint job so dumping them all into a "PPM mini bin" might not be an option.

Sometimes it is worth it though. IMHO they made some curious colour choices on this guy, so i just painted the tan spots Soft Black. (Accent 2447). The rest of the fig is fine for tabletop once the gloves were painted off.

post-172-0-46577600-1346466711_thumb.jpg

 

One trick for PPM is using permanent markers rather than paint tp tweak PPMs. Last longer with rough handling and can be done right at the game table so when the DM throws down 10 Yellow Scarves orc raiders that no one can tell apart, just grab the markers and bam! A few get different coloured kilts, a couple weapons get enameled and the boss's glowing blue sword gets represented.

 

yellowscarvesorc.jpg

Do keep the permanent markers away from the battlemat markers, JIC.

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I soaked some GW daemonettes (hard plastic kind) in brake fluid and it ruined them. It weakened the plastic so much that hands broke of arms and legs broke, etc etc. Most of them could npt be saved even with gluing.

 

Pure acetone for metal is so fast and awesome. I use a really stiff short bristle paintbrush to get all the little details paint out of the cracks and stuff.

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  • 1 month later...

As a rule of thumb, the faster the action the more dangerous the chemical.

 

I suppose acetone would work, but I preferr rubbing alcohol. It's slower, and correspondingly safer. I soak minis in a sealed jar of it overnight, then clean with running water and a toothbrush* the next day. Rubbing alcohol softens acrylic paint but does not melt it.

 

I wouldn't want to breathe anything that could melt plastic.

 

 

 

 

*A special, only-for-painting toothbrush that never sees the inside of a mouth.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I tried a lemon version of the name brand Simple Green on a metal mini and it worked great. I didn't have a lot of paint on it, a single layer in some spots, and of course primer. After about a 2 hour soak it all came off quite easily except of course for those little spots that you can't get a brush into.

 

I do have one thing a bit different to add that's not exactly about solvent, but goes with the subject at hand. I got one of those little Wisp pocket toothbrushes and used it, and it worked great! It has a little bead of some toothpaste type stuff in the middle that you can just pop right out. Then it's a simply good little hard plastic brush much smaller than your average toothbrush, thus fitting better into many areas. It also has a great small curved plastic toothpick on the other end that will help you dig out the holes that no brush can get into. I was able to fully strip the whole mini, including chainmail, using just the Wisp.

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I tried out Fairy Power Spray and its awesome. I'm not sure if you can get it in the US but its available in most supermarkets in the UK.

 

fairy-power-spary.jpg

 

It works on metal and plastic, strips paint and primer really well and works in about 15 minutes and its cheap. Despite that its safe on the skin and doesn't stink. I've tried loads of paint stripping techniques from Brake Fluid (horrible and dangerous) to Nitormoors Paint Stripper (really really horrid stuff)

 

Examples on my blog here (http://miniaturesfor...r-painting.html)

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