Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Lastman

Do you add highlights or shadows first?

Recommended Posts

Do you add highlights or shadows first?

 

I add shadows before highlights but some experts in books do the opposite.

 

I'm happy with my results but still wonder if there's a benefit that I'm missing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I start with my shadow as my basecoat and work my way up to highlights. I've been told that this can be a less precise way of highlighting and that the "right" way of doing this is by adding the shadows and highlights to the midtone. The problem I have with that is I have a hard time visualizing the way it should look and where exactly I need to add the shadows. By highlighting up, if a shadow doesn't look quite right I can go back and hit it with more of the midtone to highlights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally, I start with my shadow as my basecoat and work my way up to highlights. I've been told that this can be a less precise way of highlighting and that the "right" way of doing this is by adding the shadows and highlights to the midtone. The problem I have with that is I have a hard time visualizing the way it should look and where exactly I need to add the shadows. By highlighting up, if a shadow doesn't look quite right I can go back and hit it with more of the midtone to highlights.

 

Ditto... I find it easier as well. I think this comes from the way I learned how to paint (base coat - and then dry brush up through the highlights). I may try the midtone - shadow - highlight technique on a larger fig sometime. But for now I find it easier to lay down the darkest and work my way up. If I need to - like on large cloaks etc, I often go back to the darker tones as I am layering/blending - but I've yet to do it as a regular practice. In the end - you should find out which works best for you - but you knew that already. :poke:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen (in magazines, i think) folks use a lighter basecoat over a model (let's say it's a naked human), then apply a wash of a darker color to run to the lowest areas to form shadowed areas. After that, midtones and highlights are applied over the wash.

 

I've always worked my way up from shadows to mids to highlights, but i can see the advantages of the above method... anybody have experience with that they'd like to share?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I usually go the midtone -> shadows -> highlights route, though in practice, it's sometimes midtone -> shadows -> midtone -> highlight -> midtone -> shadows -> highlight. ::):

 

If I am using brown magic wash, I normally go a little lighter than I want the final colors to be, then do the wash, then the midtone, and then the final highlight.

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prime --> Basecoat --> find missed mold lines and flash --> strip --> reprime --> find more missed mold lines and flash --> strip --> reprime --> basecoat with shadow or midtone, depending on mood --> not happy with it STRIP! --> reprime --> discover yet more mold lines I missed --> strip --> reprime --> start with interior this time only and midtone --> try the shadow then highlight route --> not happy --> STRIP!!! --> ad nauseum...

 

Yeah, people wonder why I never finish a mini...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it depends on what you are painting, actually.

 

Some figures are sculpted with areas that are not very easily accesible and that usually go in darker colors, so the smart thing to do is paint the dark shades first and then work your way through the highlights.

 

An approach that I find useful fo smoothing the color transitions is to go first from dark to light, and then work my way back from light to dark, thus obtaining a consistent gradient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes (not trying to a be smart-aleck, just trying to be proficient in all approaches)... Alternately see Ary's approach above (sounds about like what I do the other percentage of time)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Um, what Ary said.

 

Personally I like laying down the midtone and then working down into the shadows. I can then blend any rough areas back into the midtone and take it up to the highlights. Another blend back down into the midtones if needed and I'm happy.

 

I've tried going from shadows up to highlights and it just doesn't work for me. Since 50% of the mini is midtones it makes sense to me to lay that one down first. (The other percentages are 25% shadows and 25% highlights, in case you were wondering.)

 

Try it a few different ways and see what works for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...