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Glaze?


beanie
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I've frequently used the word translucent to describe it; The technique originated from an oil painting technique of using a translucent layer of paint that will shift the existing color of the area that you cover with the glaze.

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Put another way, it's a controlled wash designed to leave a thin translucent layer of paint over the previously layer. Unlike a (regular) wash, the idea is more to put a uniform(ish) layer over the entire surface rather than having the paint collect mostly in the areas that you want shadows.

 

One example might be a reddish area that you have highlighted using orangish hues. To shift the whole area's color back more to the red side (while preserving but toning down the highlights somewhat) would be to apply a red glaze.

 

I've found that I like the cherry-ish looking "wood" that I get by base coating with Leather Brown and then using a Mahogany Brown glaze on top.

 

Ron

 

PS: I also like Krispy Kreme Glazed donuts. ::):

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Glazing is a technique used for color shifting your work, or to help smooth the blending of layers from shadow to highlight. As already said, it's choosing the color, taking a small bit of it and adding lots of water. Thinner than a glaze, but enough color to do what you want. Thickness depends on what you're doing and the results you need...and your patience level. With a wash, you load up your brush and slop the wash over an area, letting it run around and collect in the cracks. A glaze is controlled, don't load your brush too much! You're painting it on just like any other layer, but just more thinly so your work underneath shows and has been either shifted in color, or the blending is smoothing out. For some of my work, I'm suing multiple colors, or glazing over and over until I get the result I like. It is especially useful in feathering to get smooth blends, and to correct color problems, such as blonde hair you want more reddish, perhaps your shade of green is clashing with the other parts of the mini so you can adjust the color with a glaze of yellow greens or blue greens to get the right color, or correct shading that has lost the color punch you wanted. Some people use inks for that last bit, but I use a simple glaze. So...remember to choose the color wisely, keep it thin, control the application just like you would normal paint.

 

And once you master that, ask about gwashes, Wazes, and other bizarre terms for people working it their own way.

 

Whew! Longest answer I've given in a long time!

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Glazing is a technique used for color shifting your work, or to help smooth the blending of layers from shadow to highlight. As already said, it's choosing the color, taking a small bit of it and adding lots of water. Thinner than a glaze, but enough color to do what you want. Thickness depends on what you're doing and the results you need...and your patience level. With a wash, you load up your brush and slop the wash over an area, letting it run around and collect in the cracks. A glaze is controlled, don't load your brush too much! You're painting it on just like any other layer, but just more thinly so your work underneath shows and has been either shifted in color, or the blending is smoothing out. For some of my work, I'm suing multiple colors, or glazing over and over until I get the result I like. It is especially useful in feathering to get smooth blends, and to correct color problems, such as blonde hair you want more reddish, perhaps your shade of green is clashing with the other parts of the mini so you can adjust the color with a glaze of yellow greens or blue greens to get the right color, or correct shading that has lost the color punch you wanted. Some people use inks for that last bit, but I use a simple glaze. So...remember to choose the color wisely, keep it thin, control the application just like you would normal paint.

 

And once you master that, ask about gwashes, Wazes, and other bizarre terms for people working it their own way.

 

Whew! Longest answer I've given in a long time!

You forgot "Schlorping" ::D:

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Thanks

AWhang

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Beanie,

 

What Sue said! ^_^

 

She was the one who taught me what to use a glaze for.

 

Now that you have several long winded explanations here is a short and concise one:

 

A glaze is a wash that is thinned down a bit more. It is used in a thin layer to regulate highlights and color transitions. You don't want the glaze to pool so you need to blot the brush before applying it to your mini. You want just a thin layer of pigment over the entire area you are highlighting.

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Possibly one of the dang funniest threads to ever pop up on these boards, and we were even on-topic!

 

--Anne :lol:

p.s., I DID actually save that discussion under my Painting Book files!

 

Yes, and Mr. Wong gave us a tidy little glossary of all the terms we defined. Was much fun and how else do you describe certain weird things painters do to make it look right?! I'm sure there are other terms we'll come up with as we discover various styles and techniques of painting. Ehem. If it's thicker than a glaze, but not a wash, what is it? If a painter adds water directly on the mini to thin down a wash or glaze that's too thick...what are we going to call that? And that dragon I did, is there a term to differentiate glazing entire sections from glazing only the highlights?! A glaze is in the gaze of the painter?! See what happens when you bring up that schlorping business? :devil:

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I'm only on my second model, but I don't think it's insane of me to want them to look up to par. I was really just asking so I knew! Other than that, I'm amused I've been glazing Kara without realizing it. :lol:

 

Sometimes you do it right without realizing it, and it's a great feeling. Because of the paint I used when I started (tube acrylics), I was forced to thin my paint from the get-go. It was cool to learn later just how important that could be.

 

Hey, if you learn good technique early, you won't have to unlearn bad habbits later. One of the toughest things about teaching the "Old School" painters is getting them to give up 20 years of bad habbits.

 

I don't think it's insane for you to want them to look "up to par" either. I just don't want you to push yourself so hard you get discouraged. You won't learn this after two minis, or ten, or even 100. Have some patience. There will always be more to learn.

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