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Basic rule to painting.


Dedros
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I've been painting for about two decades now, and the one thing I think of when I pick up a model is, "How does this thing get dressed?"

 

Okay, let me explain. When you paint a model, you want do do it in layers. You start with the basic skin, the first layer. Then you put on the underwear, then the pants, then the shirt, then any jewelry. You getting the picture? You paint like this to help you keep the messes to a minimal, and to help you keep a clean and organized model. You don't want to paint the armor of a knight first and then see that sliver of a tunic peeking at you under all that metal. You would ruin that nice new coat of paint trying to get that tunic to look right.

 

God bless and keep you safe.

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That's a good general rule and the one that I follow. I will add the caveat (or refinement) that generally, painting is easier for beginners going from inner surfaces to outer surfaces. So, if, say, a (bare) hand/arm is in front of a piece of clothing, it may be easier to paint the clothing first even though it is "put on" after the skin.

 

Ron

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I've been painting for about two decades now, and the one thing I think of when I pick up a model is, "How does this thing get dressed?"

 

Yes, as a general rule that is a very good procedure to follow however (rules love to be broken, don't they ::): )...

 

Many times, things like deep hollows and hard to reach nooks and crannies need to be hit first just because of the difficulty of their position. Sometimes it's just a swab of a darker or shade of the surrounding color, but doing that first could save one from lots of heartache later (I know from experience...and I still miss a lot of these "gotcha" areas).

 

For those who like to dry-brush chainmail and other metalic areas (I know some of you are out there... <_< ), that's another thing you'd probably want to do before painting the surrounding area, just because dry-brushing can be a bit "messy".

 

Confidence level and point of interest might also be a reason for tackling things a little "out of order" also. For instance, after painting a few Orc grunts I suddenly started to get excited about NMM. To keep my interest and momentum going I started taking on that challenge, confident that the rest would be OK (having just done 3 or 4, I was pretty sure about where the "gotcha" areas were).

 

Yes, as a general rule, it is very good to work "in to out", but beware of following any rules too blindly. Depending upon a sculpt, that rule could lead you to paint yourself into a corner (...that metaphore doesn't even make sense does it :blink: )

 

-AW

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As you say, it is a very good place to start. My first mini's were a box set from Ral Partha, and they came with painting instructions saying this very same rule. Start here with this rule and then let your experience guide you as you go. Also, don't be afraid to try new things.

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My basic rule, "Stop complaining about time and just do it." I usually break this rule.

Hahahaha, all too often I find myself swamped with other people's models! It is amazing how many people don't want to paint their own figures! It is too blasted time consuming if you're an anal person like myself. I want to highlight it all, and if I miss a bit of detail I'm a mess. So needless to say I've got many models, but not many PAINTED models. Least not my own, I paint kinda freelance.

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My basic rule, "Stop complaining about time and just do it." I usually break this rule.

Hahahaha, all too often I find myself swamped with other people's models! It is amazing how many people don't want to paint their own figures! It is too blasted time consuming if you're an anal person like myself. I want to highlight it all, and if I miss a bit of detail I'm a mess. So needless to say I've got many models, but not many PAINTED models. Least not my own, I paint kinda freelance.

 

I hear you. I have the same problem. Lots of unpainted lead of my own laying around. Also unpainted lead that belongs to other people... sigh.

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My basic rule, "Stop complaining about time and just do it." I usually break this rule.

Hahahaha, all too often I find myself swamped with other people's models! It is amazing how many people don't want to paint their own figures! It is too blasted time consuming if you're an anal person like myself. I want to highlight it all, and if I miss a bit of detail I'm a mess. So needless to say I've got many models, but not many PAINTED models. Least not my own, I paint kinda freelance.

 

I hear you. I have the same problem. Lots of unpainted lead of my own laying around. Also unpainted lead that belongs to other people... sigh.

That is an ugly road. Overwhelming and stress city. I had to put and end to it, and try to concentrate on my own stuff. I feel so much better. I don't paint stuff for other people unless it's for their birthday or something special like that.

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That is an ugly road. Overwhelming and stress city. I had to put and end to it, and try to concentrate on my own stuff. I feel so much better. I don't paint stuff for other people unless it's for their birthday or something special like that.

 

I completely agree; I don't take commissions anymore unless it's for a special cause or a friend. Amazing, I actually have time to work on competition entries this year!

 

--Anne ::):

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That is an ugly road. Overwhelming and stress city. I had to put and end to it, and try to concentrate on my own stuff. I feel so much better. I don't paint stuff for other people unless it's for their birthday or something special like that.

 

I completely agree; I don't take commissions anymore unless it's for a special cause or a friend. Amazing, I actually have time to work on competition entries this year!

 

--Anne ::):

Time to spend working on your own models is priceless!

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