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Doing woodgrain


Ishil
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Can anyone give me some tips and/or good colours to do woodgrain, say on a shield? (I tried using the Grey Browns triad, which from the names of the paints should be ideal, but it didn't come out very special. Unless that was just me...)

 

Ishil

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Can anyone give me some tips and/or good colours to do woodgrain, say on a shield? (I tried using the Grey Browns triad, which from the names of the paints should be ideal, but it didn't come out very special. Unless that was just me...)

 

Ishil

 

Are you freehanding the wood grain, or is it sculpted on? If the former, Derek Schubert gave me a great recipe for woodgrain last year at ReaperCon:

  1. Basecoat with Mahogany Brown
  2. Wash with Brown Liner
  3. Paint the wood grain lines with Rust Brown
  4. Highlight the lines (knots, etc) with Rosy Shadow
  5. Glaze with Rust Brown

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If it's sculpted in texture and you want that old, grayed wood look, this is a recipe I like. Base in Shield Brown, wash with Walnut for the shadows. Then start your drybrushing/wetbrushing/layering/whatever with Shield Brown, adding in touches of Polished Bone as you go up. (The Polished Bone is from the first, grayish bones triad.) The cart of this tank was done in that way, and the staff on this character used a similar colour scheme (it was painted with pro-paint rather than Master Series.) If that's still not gray enough looking, you could try 50/50 with the Shield Brown and Aged Bone.

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I had good luck basing in earth brown, then freehanding grain in tanned leather, keeping the lines organic and not too thick or straight or even. Now go back and deepen the recesses of grain with brown liner. I tend to go back and forth a few times until I think there is enough contrast. Then I pick out areas for highlights and hit them with first creamy ivory, then linen white. If you are really ambitious, make a thin wash with clear veridian and selectively apply it to give the wood a mossy, natural look. Just don't muss up your highlights. Gives convincing results for me even on completely smooth areas.

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What sort of woodgrain? Light colored, or darK? Pine, Oak or just generic? When I do some woodgrains, I do it with very short loose lines, multiple layers of colors of dark browns and up to something like Golden Blond, and use inks or glazes in there with a couple layers to give it some depth... Here's one of my earlier results on the bard's lute slung over his back. Small grained, but hopefully shows some woody texture. Use glazes to make it darker or lighter, or change the color if you need to, just get the basics of light and dark and medium tone grain lines first.

 

post-1042-1180445618.jpg

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Wood comes in lots of colors, so there won't be any one right selection of paints. The colors on the rest of your mini will affect how the wood looks, too.

The colors that Angela quoted from my class would be good for rosewood or mahogany -- very red or pink. You can use yellower or greener browns for newly cut wood, or the original Bone triad for old/weathered wood, or more orange or purple tones for the more exotic species. For a basic brown on my last few shield-interiors, I basecoated with Earth Brown; lined (between the boards) with Brown Liner; brushed some more diluted Brown Liner into the shadows; and then highlighted up with Earth Brown, Driftwood Brown, and Stained Ivory.

 

Technique varies, from more realistic (woodgrain is merely hinted at in the direction of brushstrokes, since it's so small in scale) to more stylized (wider strips of light and dark). If the grain has been sculpted (well), then just follow the sculpted lines. If you're adding grain as freehand (since real woodgrain rarely has a prominent texture), then add wavering lines that are roughly parallel with each other, and throw in knots or Y-shapes occasionally. Don't forget that even the darker grain should have highlights; I usually shade and highlight the whole item in the darker grain-color, and then add the lighter grain... and then glaze and touch up, because it never looks right on the first try. :;):

 

Good luck,

Derek

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The miniature is done now - I gave up on the woodgrain and did something simpler (my first attempt looked like 'brown stripes', not good). But I'll try again sometime; thanks for the help.

 

Ishil

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I think the key to good patterns like woodgrain, marble etc is to just grab a few colors and do it. Don't over think it. Kind of a zen painting exercise, if you will.

 

As my graduate school adviser used to say "Don't think, just Do"

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