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The Bronze Age


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I'm using bronze metallics as part of my armies color scheme.

And tips on how to make the metallic paint really pop.

I just don't like the effect I'm getting now.

I've tried drybrushing but that comes out to grainy.

I'm really confused about what colors, if any, I should try with a wash for the bronze.

And, I know this may seem odd to all of you, but for some odd reason, it doesn't look good when I try layering gold on top of it, perhaps I'm doing it wrong?

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Bronze is my favorite metallic. I use it a lot.

 

When I wash it, I thin based on what I'm using. If I'm using black, for example, for a crisp look I'll thin it much more than usual. 5, maybe 6 drops of water per drop of black.

 

This takes a couple of gos, but it seeps into the joints and makes them pop. If it's getting gold, that goes on over it. If it's staying bronze, I'll do a very light drybrush.

 

If I'm looking for something warmer, I'll wash with mahogony brown. The slight reddish tinge works well with the bronze, at least to my eyes. I'll thin this less than black, 3-4 drops.

 

But above all, the trick I use to avoid graininess is to thin it well.

 

Your mileage may vary, but that's what my experiments have shown me.

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This may help: http://www.hacklopedia.com/miniatures/lita.shtml although we used the wrong pictures and better ones are coming this weekend.

 

Basically my metal recipe is painting red or yellow (for bronze/gold/copper), or white/gray/blue (for silver), then washing with thinned mettalic. I think some call this demi-metallic. Next, you'll want to do a wash. The color depends. It's hard to go wrong with Vallejo Model Color Smoke. I've also used a brownish-purple Iron Wind Metals paint for the bronze on my green/brown lizard men. Green should work for red, purple, or blue figures. Be creative, and think about color theory. Besides thinned paints, ink also works well for this.

 

The key that you may be missing is the final highlight. Once the wash is dry go back and apply a glaze of the original metallic on the highlights. Sometimes I mix a little mithril in with my gold/bronze, but I bet a light yellow would work as well. I know a little white in my mithril seems to work for silver highlighting.

 

You can also play with Testor's Mettalizers or Vallejo's alcohol based metallics. Just don't mix them with anything and be sure to clean them properly. I've used both.

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How do I glaze with a metallic to acheive highlights?

 

This may help: http://www.hacklopedia.com/miniatures/lita.shtml although we used the wrong pictures and better ones are coming this weekend.

 

Basically my metal recipe is painting red or yellow (for bronze/gold/copper), or white/gray/blue (for silver), then washing with thinned mettalic. I think some call this demi-metallic. Next, you'll want to do a wash. The color depends. It's hard to go wrong with Vallejo Model Color Smoke. I've also used a brownish-purple Iron Wind Metals paint for the bronze on my green/brown lizard men. Green should work for red, purple, or blue figures. Be creative, and think about color theory. Besides thinned paints, ink also works well for this.

 

The key that you may be missing is the final highlight. Once the wash is dry go back and apply a glaze of the original metallic on the highlights. Sometimes I mix a little mithril in with my gold/bronze, but I bet a light yellow would work as well. I know a little white in my mithril seems to work for silver highlighting.

 

You can also play with Testor's Mettalizers or Vallejo's alcohol based metallics. Just don't mix them with anything and be sure to clean them properly. I've used both.

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How do I glaze with a metallic to acheive highlights?

 

The same way you do with any paint - selectively apply thin coats of pure metallic where desired (or metallic mixed with white or Ice Yellow), let dry (usually a minute or two), and repeat as necessary.

 

The only thing to watch is to not mix alcohol or enamel based paints with acrylics, and the Vallejo Liquido Oro and Testor's metallizers are not acrylic based.

 

Remember, with the dark wash you can slop over the whole thing, and even give fairly thick coats just in the crevices, but with the glaze you are very selectively choosing where the paint goes.

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