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Green stuff...dippable?


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Hi all.

 

Just curious if Green Stuff is dunkable/dippable/strippable once cured? The reason I ask is because I saw the battle base article in the old Casketworks someone linked in the Pirate Queen thread in General.

I use that exact technique to fill the bases of my minis now, but I use Creative Paper Clay instead. It's cheap, light and dries fast.

However, it can't be dipped in Simple Green to remove paint if I screw up a paintjob. So, I've been painting my minis from the head down, stopping at the legs and/or boots, then basing and painting the rest.

If I switched to Gren Stuff, could I base everything ahead of time, and strip the whole deal if I mess up?

 

I guess there's no real reason to alter my current technique...I was just curious.

 

Thanks!

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I've left green stuff in simple green for weeks and it has been fine. It will soften, so if it is unpinned and/or supporting a heavy piece, it may bend/deform or fall off from the weight. A sculpted base though should be okay.

 

Once you remove the item from the Green stuff, hit it with the toothbrush and rinse, let it sit. The Green Stuff will get hard once again.

 

I've never experienced Green Stuff disintegrating in Simple Green.

 

It's held up quite well in W&N brush cleaner as well. Although I've only had figures in there for about 48 hours.

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I had a model with a cork base that I wanted to strip. Not something you'd want to dunk in SG, because it would come apart. I sprayed the model with a non-aerosol oven cleaning gel, being careful not to get this on the base. It stripped the mini without causing a problem for the base.

 

I'd recommend you get a paint on sealer for wood and similar materials, then seal the base before you strip. That should also help keep the base from being damaged if a little cleaner drips on it. You can get an inexpense sealer anywhere you can buy craft paint. It will be with their sealers and mediums.

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Thanks for all the replies folks. From the sounds of it, I think I'll just stick with painting before basing. Everything else just sounds too hairy an experience for me, lol.

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You can also get creative with your dunking system. I recently suspended a mini with a great custom base and a revolting paint job in my strip jar so that the mini was soaked, yet the base was nice and dry. It was pretty easy to do, since it involved a magnetic base, a rare earth magnet, and a sculpting tool balanced across the top of the jar, but I'm sure you could come up with a non-magnetic rig that would do the same thing.

 

A little brush-on stripper (easy with W&N brush cleaner) will take care of the leftover paint bits around the mini's feet.

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Have you tried coating or soaking the dried paper clay with superglue? This makes paper products largely waterproof and should be enough to survive a dip.

 

Really you only have to worry if the mini soaks for days. As mentioned, some solvents can soften green stuff a bit, but just leave it overnight before priming and it'll harden again. I do extensive conversions with green stuff knowing full well I may have to strip the model, and it's no real problem.

 

You can use hardware store epoxy putty as well; there's one for repairing gas tanks that's well nigh indestructible. I've used it to fill and weight bases. Cures much more quickly than green stuff and it's cheaper, too.

 

It *is* easier to have the base all prepped and filled before priming. Don't let the possibility of botched paint keep you from it.

 

Shut up, Flynn. We don't need your vile habits passed on to others. ::P:

 

--Jen

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No worries that Flynn will pass his vile habits on to me. I bought a second RP Elf Chariot because I lost pieces of my first one, and some of them broke, and I still have both sets. :lol:

 

My husband gets his "brown stuff" at Big Lots. It's an epoxy that is in two parts, looks just like brown stuff, and comes in a massive container. He gets it for about $1, I think. It's made for fixing engines and radiators and he got the hint about it from Herr Oberfroschmeister/Frosch/Froggy/Lanse (can you settle on a name, oh frogged one?). It works well, and I imagine that since it's made to stand up to automobile chemicals and road hazards, that it's going to take a pounding from paint stripper and laugh it off.

 

I'd check some out using Simple Green, but we ran out, and I have real paint stripper, now. Might be a good idea to see how well it stands up to non-cleaning solution paint stripper, though. :unsure:

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You can use hardware store epoxy putty as well; there's one for repairing gas tanks that's well nigh indestructible. I've used it to fill and weight bases. Cures much more quickly than green stuff and it's cheaper, too.

 

--Jen

 

Doesn't that stuff stink to high heaven? I stopped using it when I got my hands on Apoxysculpt. Takes a little longer to cure than the cheap stuff, but it's still rock-hard when it sets.

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