Jump to content

Kids banned from playing tag at several schools


Krztoff
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 16
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

true, Vejlin, true.

 

 

sadly, i am not the kind who treats kids like lil' cream puffs...they WILL grow up to be adults with hormones, jobs, and a need to vent stress....adults in need of training.

and when growing up less is more DOES NOT work as far as learning.

 

this is sick...why not make ethics lessons and teach discipline as kids?

humanitarianism vs. complacent cream-puff placidity

 

hey, does anyone here have 8yr olds in Martial Arts classes? i have friend's offspring and nieces (NIECES, mind you) who are....

they turn out pretty sharp by Age 10...

(i myslef have yet to reproduce...not like i haven't tried, but you'd be amazed how many not-quite-women exist who adhere to the kind of philosophies mentioned in link above...it's amazing how being a smart, honest man makes you less attractive...so, yeah...)

 

*guilty of almost ranting*

 

 

in closing.

"raise 'em right, people! problem will get solved!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

....how can you be forced into playing tag? Being chased implies that you're running away from them/encouraging them. Just let them tag you and ignore them.

 

@matsumoto: yeah, martial arts are pretty good for discipline. Not quite so much on the ethics, except as they relate to use of the martial art, but still very beneficial.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember in elementary school playing king of the hill on the giant pile of snow created from clearing the snow off of some parts of the playground and the parking lot. It was a lot of fun, but I can't imagine that happening at this school.

 

What really puzzles me is that it didn't say anything about the kids getting chased, caught, pinned to the ground, and having their teeth smashed out with a brick, or anything like that. I fail to see how just getting chased is an issue. Isn't that just a part of elementary school? Doesn't everyone here remember chasing/being chased by others?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me provide an anecdote for everyone.

 

 

Once upon a time, about 35 or so years ago, a little girl was trying to play with some friends during recess in the first grade. One little boy in particular decided to chase her. The little girl did not feel like playing, so she told the teacher. Now, the teacher in question and the little girl did not get along. The teacher thought the little girl was a little too independent, stubborn, and self-sufficient. The little girl thought the teacher hated her.

 

The teacher did nothing to stop the little boy, so the little girl tried, again, to explain to her that she did not want to be chased. After the little girl told the teacher the third time with nothing being done, the little girl took matters into her own hands.

 

Now, the little girl was young but had already been in training for a couple of years as a competitive figure skater. She had learned various things beyond staying up on 1/4" wide blades, such as a jump called a "Stag" jump. Basically, it's a flying sidekick. Using this maneuver, she stopped running from the boy, turned around, ran towards him, and did a stag jump.

 

She was aiming for the head on his shoulders.

 

She hit the other one, nearly crippling him for the rest of his life.

 

He never chased her again, but she got into trouble for taking matters into her own hands.

 

True story.

 

How do I know it was true? The little girl was me. :blush:

 

 

If tag had been banned back then, that little boy would have never been so badly hurt. While I know supervised tag can be quite fun, some kids can get rough by pulling hair in order to "tag" you, ripping your clothes, hitting, and other things that, if done to me, would generally get them beat up.

 

Dodge ball is another game I despised.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, being encouraged by your teachers to throw a ball at other people, often hitting them in the head (funny in and of itself) or nailing them in the foot they were about to put down while they were running (while harder to pull off, infinitely more satisfying as they would fall flat on their face) was something you didn't look forward to?!?

 

:rock:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me provide an anecdote for everyone.

While I can understand your view, I don't see tag or chasing as the problem in your story.

 

The problem there was the teacher.

 

Now, granted, maybe the teacher thought it was nothing at the time, but given that you did ask three times, and then had to take action yourself, if I were the principal, the teacher and the little boy would have gotten in as much trouble as the you did.

 

Of course, that does depend on the teacher admitting you tried, or there being witnesses to such.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If tag had been banned back then, that little boy would have never been so badly hurt. While I know supervised tag can be quite fun, some kids can get rough by pulling hair in order to "tag" you, ripping your clothes, hitting, and other things that, if done to me, would generally get them beat up.

 

Dodge ball is another game I despised.

 

So instead of teaching the kids how to function around other people (stuff like not pulling hair and not hitting), we should instead remove them from the situations that they can't figure out how to handle. I have to disagree with that approach, and it will in the end as someone else pointed out lead to kids with zero physical contact with each other. If kids reach school age and still can't figure out how to play with other kids without hitting and pulling hair, then the solution isn't to avoid the situations where it occurs. The kids need to learn these basic skills of how to interact with others in an acceptable way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I didn't. :angry:

 

 

I'm not, generally, a violent person. Some of the kids took dodgeball as a free ride to bully and inflict pain on the smaller kids. Those red balls they used, when thrown hard enough, would leave large welts. One kid ended up with a bloody nose. While you might have considered it funny, many others didn't. Generally during dodgeball I tried to get "out" as quickly as possible just so I wouldn't be subjected to some of the more brutal attacks. <_<

 

 

I also did not enjoy having my hair yanked as hard as possible in order to "tag" me, or getting my shirts ripped (happened on a couple of occassions). It wasn't limited to boys, either, as there were some girls who would do the same thing. After a while, I got sick and tired of it and wasn't going to put up with it anymore. I started fighting back, much to the chagrin of the poor boy mentioned above. I will say, however, that in doing what I did prevented the others from pulling similar stunts against me during the duration of my attendance at that school. :ph34r:

 

@veijlin: If children, by the time they are in the first grade, do not understand that pulling hair and hitting is a bad thing, then their parents have already failed at a basic level of social instruction. Children should understand this before even entering kindergarten.

 

@kristof65: Unfortunately, neither the teacher nor the little boy were even reprimanded in any way. He was considered the victim and I was made out to be the bully. As I mentioned, the teacher didn't like me to begin with. This was only a sample of the problems I had with her. Often she would not accept the classwork I turned in because she didn't like my handprinting. She was a horrible teacher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So those who despise Tag, dodgeball, and any game that lets kids pick who plays on which team (like Kickball)... that mean you won't be signing up for the Adult Dodgeball or Kickball leagues this fall?

 

Guess we can scratch you from the list of participants for the Tag tournament as well..

 

Seriously, banning a game on the playground just means the bullies will get more creative.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree that the skills should have been learned earlier, that was my point. Removing tag won't really change anything though. The bullies will still bully. Tag is a game. Tag is not the problem, bullies being allowed to bully is the problem.

 

And why on earth was it tolerated that kids used games as an excuse to be violent? Is there no middle ground between total anarchy on the playground and banning anything where bullies have an opportunity to bully?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not, generally, a violent person. Some of the kids took dodgeball as a free ride to bully and inflict pain on the smaller kids. Those red balls they used, when thrown hard enough, would leave large welts. One kid ended up with a bloody nose. While you might have considered it funny, many others didn't. Generally during dodgeball I tried to get "out" as quickly as possible just so I wouldn't be subjected to some of the more brutal attacks. <_<

 

 

I also did not enjoy having my hair yanked as hard as possible in order to "tag" me, or getting my shirts ripped (happened on a couple of occassions). It wasn't limited to boys, either, as there were some girls who would do the same thing. After a while, I got sick and tired of it and wasn't going to put up with it anymore. I started fighting back, much to the chagrin of the poor boy mentioned above. I will say, however, that in doing what I did prevented the others from pulling similar stunts against me during the duration of my attendance at that school. :ph34r:

 

This sounds like what I had to go through in school. The teasing , name calling, physical abuse the other kids would inflict was awful. I would report it to the teachers, my Parents, the Principal, and even try to ignore the kids who were doing it to me hoping they would stop. Nothing worked. My Parents screaming at the school to stop the nonsense didn't work. What worked? In tenth grade there was a senior at my school ranked second in the state in wrestling. The ignorant twit thought it wonderful to sexually harrass me in the halls and his friends thought it funny. He'd grab at me, pin me against the wall and lewdly touch me, nothing I did as far as reporting the problem stopped it. Finally one day I had enough. The wrestler got clotheslined by me and I dragged him across the floor in front of his friends. He never bothered me again. He apparently didn't think a girl a foot shorter than him who weighed less than him could take him out.

 

After that people started to leave me alone, but it took me fighting back to get any results. There was a Freshman guy when I was a sophomore who didn't get the message and repeatedly he gave me issues. One day when he came up to me and made a lewd comment about my chest size I had enough, grabbed him by the scruff of his shirt, slammed him against a locker and told him to knock it off. He did. Apparently getting the crap kicked out of them by a girl was enough to make them back off, where threats from Teachers and Principals wouldn't work.

 

Dodgeball? I loathed that too. The guys were ruthless with those balls whipping them at people as hard as they could. It was like they were trying to prove to themselves they were stronger than the other boys because they could whip them harder than Joe Shmoe down at the end of the line. That game was finally banned in a small handfull of local schools after some kid got their jaw broken from one of the whipped balls.

 

Other than defending myself from the bullying of others I kept to myself and did my own thing. I kind of preferred to stay away from most people and get my schoolwork done and play in the art room. Violent? Hardly. I only got violent in self defense when all other attempts at making the crap stop didn't work. I much rather prefer to puurr like a kitten then claw like a lion on the hunt.

 

Ary, I'm right there with you on this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry, but Ary and Enchantra, you learned a very important lesson at a very early age. A lesson that has probably carried through out your life even if you don't realize it You learned to fight for yourself. That realization, and the will to carry it through, protected you from the other bullies. Bullies are cowards, they prey on the weak and those who think they are helpless.

I've yet to see anything other than giving them a good butt kicking that works.

 

You would give in and let many children not learn this lesson, until too late.

Zero Tolerance of fighting hasn't stopped bullies, neither will this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...