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54mm Mounted Samurai


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Hey, guys! I've been buckling down and working on an entry for the historical show next month here in Chicago. On the PlanetFigure forum, I've started a progress thread on the model. Rather than duplicate it, I thought I'd just post the link here for anyone who's interested.

 

http://www.planetfigure.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24489

 

Lots and lots and lots of spiffy miniatures there...

 

--Jen

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Hey Jen,

 

Looks great. Just one question.

 

How the heck do you use chalk pastels on minis ?!?!? :blink: Even 54mm...

 

Okay - I gues the question is what application are you using them for - I would assume the spots - but maybe you are using them like a glaze? Then clear coating? or is it for weathering?

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How the heck do you use chalk pastels on minis ?!?!? :blink: Even 54mm...

 

Okay - I gues the question is what application are you using them for - I would assume the spots - but maybe you are using them like a glaze? Then clear coating? or is it for weathering?

 

Grind 'em up (I scrape some onto my palette with a knife) and apply the powder with a brush. Blow away excess, spray on Dullcote, repeat as needed. It's great for weathering on 30mm scale. I'm beginning to use them for shading and coloring on larger pieces. On the horse I used black and white both for shading and 'scrubbed' on in place of glazes to soften the dapple pattern and painted hairs. I'm working on an 80mm Pegaso cheesecake chick where all the shadows on the flesh and the eye makeup color are done with pastel. Much, much easier than paints, when there's enough surface area. It doesn't work as well for this on smaller pieces.

 

--Jen

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Yeah, Stubb's right, pastels are an old Historicals weathering trick. Those guys have been using 'em for decades! ::D: In going to the MMSI show up in Chicago, it's really been brought home to me how much the fantasy painters and historicals painters can learn from each other (read: shamelessly steal from each other!). They're used to using things like pastels for weathering and shading, which are alien to us, but at the same time they are often unfamiliar with all the effects we can get with techniques in acrylics. It's just a smorgasbord of inspiration!

 

--Anne ::D:

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I'm pretty sure that the Historical guys picked up that trick from the Model Railroaders. How to use and apply chalk articles can be found in those magazines back to the 30's and 40's.

 

I have been using it for years and it doesn't work well on 25/28 and smaller miniatures except for vehicles. Anything larger is fair game for this one.

 

You can go to an art store an pick up individual sticks or go to a railroad shop and probably find several different sets for weathering all ready to go.

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Heisler is right about weathering kits. A friend of mine gave me a bunch of chalks for railroad and historical models when he switched to using powdered chalks. No grinding, just use them right out of the package.

 

I think Tamiya makes a weathering kit with powdered chalks. Probably cheaper to pick up individual pastels at an art store, though.

Edited by Cerridwyn1st
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At this point I will jump in and say: be very careful about using the ground-up pastels. Do not breathe that stuff! Any art student will tell you that pastels can be a big health hazard (which makes me all the more :blink: thinking about my grade school art teacher having us use real pastels in our little art classes, ages ago...). So be safe, people!

 

--Anne ::):

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Love the look of the horse so far, Jen. Very very nice effect on that. One "scheme" I'd like to try someday with a horse, but I'm bad at horses, sooo right I'll stick with black & brown ones, ha ha.

 

great work

 

I have a couple of the Tamiya sets, they are more toward aircraft & military type stuff like soot, jet exhaust & such, not sure how well those would help as far as colors. They are nice thou, epically the applicator you can buy from them as well.

 

They do have snow thou (like to add on a vehicle & such)

 

RM

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Time for house-painter IX to jump in: If you want to protect yourself, get a real filter/mask. The good kind are made out of a flexible material that has enough straps & buckles to ensure a SNUG fit over the mouth AND nose. You should be able to swap filters for new ones. The filters may come in multiple varieties. Depending on what you are spraying or vapourizing or distributing in the air, you'll want a physical or a chemical filter/barrier or both...

 

FYI - my terminology is off since the last time I researched it was a while ago...

 

Those little 3M masks just don't cut it and makeshift cloth covers don't either. The contaminated air will flow around anything it can & cloth just doesn't remove all the bad stuff...

 

Odds are that you won't notice the damage until a few years later & by then it is tooo late...

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