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DemiMetallics


orcsoul
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Ok... so I'm pondering trying out demimetallics on a couple of my mini's ... but not quite sure how to start.

 

I understand the theory and concepts behind demi metallics... but right now it's not doing me much good, so i'll ask a few specific questions and see if I can't figure out what I'm having a hard time with from there.

 

For starters, let's say I wanted to give a mini a shiny set of crimson plate armor... would I mix something like blood red in with ruby red from the colored metallics triads? Or would I use a different metallic?

 

And just how 'metallicy' are the two colored metallics triads? Never having seen them I'm completely ignorant to how they look.

 

So I'm guessing what my primary question is... is how do you decide which metallic to use with the color you want to mix it with?

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Firstly, let me clarify the definition of Demi Metallics as I know it. Demi metallics utilizes mixing a metallic paint with a non metallic color for hilights and shadows. As an example, you would mix white (or yellow more likely) in with your metallic crimson for hilights and blacks or dark browns for shadows. If you mix metallics to shade/hilight metallics then you are painting in metallics and not demi. You seem to realize this, though I threw it out here just to be sure.

 

The RMS metallics are really nice. I don't have examples of my own work handy. They are bright and go on very well. They also blend great with other RMS.. haven't used them in conjunction with other brands. I do really like the Coppery Orange. I have used it here and there. There are also some good looking metallics in the propaint line.

 

As for what colors to use.. that will take a bit of experimentation on your part. Try mixing things in small amounts on your pallet until you find something you like.

 

When you get around to painting the actual model with demi techniques you will most likely do a bit of wet blending and washing specific areas to create the shadows and more wet blending to make the hilights. Essentially you will be using NMM techniques with metallic paint.

 

Hope that helps.

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Since the pigmentation in the metallics is different than non-metallic paint I don't think I would recommend adding yellow to a red metallic. I would likely shade darker on red metallics than normal and just bring it up to the red metallic paint with maybe a touch of bright red/clear red paint added to it for vibrancy. In general though, I stick with Pearl white/white for highest highlights.

 

PF has the right idea. I will shade the metallics with one of the liner colors, usually brown liner. Then I will add pearl white to the metallic paint for highlights. If I need to get sharper highlights I will add white to pearl white; the pearl white is a bit translucent.

 

I haven't used wet blending for demis before. I find that metallic paint dries a bit faster than non-metallic paint. I just layer. I also never use washes. I find that washes tend to make the metallics look a bit messy. Just my preference though.

 

As you can see there are different ways of painting demis. You'll have to play around with it a little bit to figure out what works for you as everyone is different. But there's my $0.02 about painting demis.

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Going striaght to Pearl White with the red metallic WILL lead to pink. I reccomend that you highlight by gradually adding a gold paint (with some ochres mixed in, as you're going demi-metallic) to it and after that, gradually adding some pearl white (edges of armor plates, very finest highlights, etc.) if you want highlights that pop real hard.

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Well I just spat out red as an example.. first color that came to mind sort of thing since I don't believe there is a real metallic red besides that ruby red one.

 

I'm just trying to figure out if it makes any difference which metallic you mix the non metallic with... for example... if i were to choose blackened steel obviously it would be very dark, and if i added any red.. would it appear as a very dark red or purplish metallic? Or if I did honed steel would it appear more as a natural metallic <insert chosen non metallic here>

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Well I just spat out red as an example.. first color that came to mind sort of thing since I don't believe there is a real metallic red besides that ruby red one.

 

I'm just trying to figure out if it makes any difference which metallic you mix the non metallic with... for example... if i were to choose blackened steel obviously it would be very dark, and if i added any red.. would it appear as a very dark red or purplish metallic? Or if I did honed steel would it appear more as a natural metallic <insert chosen non metallic here>

 

Right on. Just wanted to shout a\out about making the red look red as opposed to pink.

 

As for what non metallics to mix into your metallics: like all painting, there's no hard/fast rules. Imagination and experimentation are pretty fun here. For example, if you want a cool, aged bronze looking piece, you can take a bronze paint, and mix in a bit of Uniform brown (or similar Ochre or lighter brown) and maybe the barest hint of Green Liner. And shade with Brown/Green/Blue liner (I usually use a 50/50 mix of Brown and Green on "hero" type models, and substitute Blue on "Villan" types) and highlight up with a brighter gold (Like New Gold) mixed with Faded Khaki or the like. You could even warm it all up by glazing with oiled leather, or the like. Really, the possibilities are near endless.

 

As far as silvery stuff goes: Mixing the Neutral Greys triad with either of the Silver metallics triad is never a bad idea for a somewhat neutral effect. However, I've had good luck mixiing the Grey Blues Triad in with the silvers for a subtley bluish steel, and have even gone as far to mix the the Historic and Martial Blues triads in with silvers for a very over the top blue-steel effect. I've even used purples to this capacity.

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Going striaght to Pearl White with the red metallic WILL lead to pink. I reccomend that you highlight by gradually adding a gold paint (with some ochres mixed in, as you're going demi-metallic) to it and after that, gradually adding some pearl white (edges of armor plates, very finest highlights, etc.) if you want highlights that pop real hard.

 

That's why I added in there to just shade it darker and bring it up to a bright red, instead of using pearl white.

 

Gold would probably work better than yellow . . . yellow I just see as a little problematic when adding it to a red metal. That's why I was throwing out suggestions of alternate choices on how to approach it. ::):

 

I add pearl white and white to many of my metallics when getting into final highlights though.

 

As Kelcore said though just experiment. Everyone has different preferences and recipes.

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An alternative to actually mixing the metallic paint with non metallic paint is to lay down your metallic paint and then lightly glaze with a very thin non metallic. The end result is the same; you have metallic and non metallic paint reflecting light toward your eye. I have found it an easier way to shade metallics. As you get deeper into a recessed area, glaze more heavily. I've not had as much success with highlighting. It may just be another way of saying the same thing, but I am a painfully slow painter and doing it this way helps to minimize me have to remix a batch of paint.

This is what I did with my fairy queen. She was base with metallic purple (Sparkling Amethyst, I think) and then shaded with a darker purple and black.

FairyQueenComp.jpg

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As you may have guessed by some of my other posts, I've been playing around and researching metallic methods lately. It seems that there are countless ways people try to get what they want. I've been playing around with this on a mini for the past several weeks and can say I have found at least 3 methods of shading/demi-metallics that I like and that suit my paint style. Now the only problem is to choose the one I want for this mini.

 

Good luck and have fun with it.

 

TS

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I love demi-metalics.

And they can be really simple.

Basically I pick my shade,base, highlight as if the mini wasn't going to be metallic. Then I mix with those colors the silver triad (shade with shade, base with base, highlight with highlight). Basically I treat the really light silver as my white so I highlight op to that. Occasionally I'll brighten the light silver with a dash of white as well.

I love the way it works.

Also, if you want more of a NMM feel you can give the bugger a matte coat and it looks like you're a NMM master.

 

I've found demi -metalics work best with really bright vibrant colors where you can see the sparkle.... but that's just me. :)

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Vallejo makes a metallic medium with some use to add to any color. I haven't really used it much as I prefer to above method.

:wub: I've used metallic medium quite a bit, almost to the point of qualifying as 'abused' rather than 'used'. Great stuff, but it does _not_ have a clear base so you have to add perhaps just your 'shade' color, maybe even darker to get a decent midtone. I used a little bit of metallic medium when doing my limited palette experiment. It's got other uses but I can't really elaborate on just now... I need pictures otherwise no one will understand what I'm trying to say :poke:

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Here's a pic utilizing the method Jabberwocky talked about.

post-3038-1192212844_thumb.jpg

It is done by shading with a glaze /wash of regular paint applied in a very controlled way. The metal is highlighted with standard metallic paint. It is not my work, I am trying the technique and find it to be the best way I've found to paint with metallics. If you go to this link you'll find other examples and a write up on the technique by the artist: http://guildofharmony.com/armouredskeleton...leton1#picstart

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That is what I've been doing lately - I'll lay down boltgun or something and then thin glazes of a color like browns, greens, oranges etc...Then highlight with thin washes of mithril.

 

It is somewhat slow, but gives you the best shading on metallics I think. I picked that up from Vince and Jeremie.

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