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02621 and 02534 - need advice


jatbugg
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Ok. So I just signed up to this forum today... I've been painting for about three weeks. Here are a couple minis I just got done painting today. I don't get near as much done on them on a daily basis as I'd like to, since I usually have to wait until my 4 and 2 year old are in bed and my husband is home to hand our 4 month old off to... Anyway, I've worked really hard on these, I just learned how to do the whites of the eye with the colored part in the middle, which is why the sorceress doesn't have whites. :blush: I also just realized the blemish on the ninja's knife sheath, so I need to fix that... If you have any suggestions I'd love to hear them. Seeing as how new I am to this I'm sure there will be plenty of advice to give. Oh, and the word on the bag says Lisa, not USA... *husband thought it was USA...*

this one is for a gaming friend of mine. It's her monk. *Chinese name, can't remember...*

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This one is a sorceress for another gaming friend of mine. I was told she likes dark red...

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Looks like your off to a pretty good start, brush control looks fine. Guess your next step would be to start working on your highlighting and shading. Alot of different techniques for this, just have to dig around and ask questions. You eventually start to develope your own style the more you paint.

Your eyes appear to have come out rather well and they are one of the harder things to get right in my opinion.

 

You do need to work on the pics though, rather dark as I'm sure you have noticed, Makes it hard to really appreciate a good paint job ::D:

 

Oh, and welcome aboard!

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Hey - welcome!

 

Great stuff here - Like Tanker said - you'll want to add some more light when taking pics to really show off your work - but it looks like you have a firm command of the basics - and you are willing to try new stuff - which is great!

 

Don't be afraid to ask questions - and I look forward to seeing more of your stuff.

 

And BTW - your painting schedule sounds like mine - I wait until both my kids are in bed before I paint for an hour or two...

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Nice work on the ninja's eyes. (Eyes are my personal nemesis, lol.) You're off to a pretty good start. Add a bit of water to your paints to thin them out a bit. It's better to paint over the same place twice with two thin layers of paint than to try to cover it with one thick one.

When you paint your next one, keep an eye toward keeping your lines clean - you did really good on these two, but you can see a couple places in the pics where the color of the sorceress's skin got onto the leather parts (tops of her boots, the pouch on her leg). It'll get easier pretty quickly as your brush control improves with more practice. If you have a magnifying glass or book magnifier at home, you can use it to take a look at your work every so often while you're painting it to check for places where your hand was unsteady or you might have missed a spot, like the blemish you mentioned. Especially once you start mixing your own colors, it's much easier to touch up your whoopses when you still have the paint in front of you.

 

All in all, though, it's a great start.

 

(Damn, am I the only one who took ten years to get where all these new kids are after three weeks? lol)

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You're doing well! Techniques to work on...picture taking, shading, dark lining. Do you know what a wash is? Drybrushing? Layering? Glazes? These are the things that will help you develope some highlights and shadows. Work hard on shading those skintones so they look more natural, unless you're fond of the cartoonish look. Darklining would tidy up some of those lines---around the top of the boots, etc. I find that taking good pictures and looking at them before the final painting push, will give me info on where I need to sharpen things up and make any fixes.

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Do you know what a wash is? Drybrushing? Layering? Glazes? These are the things that will help you develope some highlights and shadows.

 

Let's see. Coming into this with no knowledge of any of the above, I now know about drybrushing and washes, though I'm still developing those two things. I'm guessing layering is just making your paint thin and then going over a certain spot, making it look layered for light effects, etc. Have no idea what a glaze is though... please feel free to inform me. ::D:

 

On a side note, how long does it usually take you guys to do a mini, beginning to end? It takes me about 6 hours. And how small are your brushes? My smallest unmodified brush is a 20/0, but I've modded a few to just a few strands, which is what I use for eyes and such.

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Your off to a very strong start just for being at it for weeks!! Like they all said above do some reading to strengthen some of your weaknesses. Try to place some of the skills you learn from reading into practice on your next piece.

 

As I tell myself all the time practice makes perfect. So thats what I do!!

 

Would like to see more, keepem coming!!

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You'll get a lot of help here, but let me address the metallics for you. There are several different techniques, but one that I find easy and effective is to paint and highlight the blades, bracelets, etc., as you would with non-metallic paints, then go over them with a thin wash of metallics. Finish with a thing wash of smoke, or green or purple ink.

 

For example: for a gold bracelet, start with a rich yellow, highlight the brightest parts with a lighter yellow, then give a wash of red. When dry, give a wash or 2 of gold or bronze metallics. Depending on the effect you want, was with smoke or a little purple.

 

For blades. start with black, wash with some blue ink, then use different shades of thinned metallics (such as Botgun Metal or Mithril to use GW color names) to give a metallic luster to the piece. Mix some white in with the Mithril to make a super-light silver, and use that on the very edges and tips.

 

Wash with green ink if it's a creepy looking monster.

 

You may not understand all of these terms, but keep what I've said in mind as you learn more and you'll avoid a common mistake - assuming that since metallics are reflective (which they aren't), that they'll highlight themselves (which, of course, they don't).

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Do you know what a wash is? Drybrushing? Layering? Glazes? These are the things that will help you develope some highlights and shadows.

 

Let's see. Coming into this with no knowledge of any of the above, I now know about drybrushing and washes, though I'm still developing those two things. I'm guessing layering is just making your paint thin and then going over a certain spot, making it look layered for light effects, etc. Have no idea what a glaze is though... please feel free to inform me. ::D:

 

On a side note, how long does it usually take you guys to do a mini, beginning to end? It takes me about 6 hours. And how small are your brushes? My smallest unmodified brush is a 20/0, but I've modded a few to just a few strands, which is what I use for eyes and such.

 

Layering is defined as just layers of paints, building up the colors to the highlight point...or reversed, building layers to the shadow. Whether you thin your paints or not, the technique is the same. Glaze is like a wash, only it is usually thinner and is controlled (not slopped on like a wash) and meant to be like a veil of color over existing paint. It can be used to help smooth transitions between layers, as well as shift colors. Thus that metal wash people were talking about is really a veil of metallic over thhe shaded paint. If it's meant to flow into the cracks/pool in creases and darken them--it's a wash. If it's meant to be on the surface and not pool--it's a glaze. Check out various posts and pinned material here and you'll find all sorts of discussion about techniques. Nobody really does it the same, and most of us learn something and run with it, creating our own unique way of using combinations of techniques. Don't be afraid to play. ;-)

 

And the joke runs that a mini is only "done"...

 

  • ...when the deadline hits.
  • ...when you're about to throw it through a window because you can't stand it anymore.
  • ...when you're happy with it.

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I diden't read anybodies comments so here are my own, they look good for someone painting for three weeks, (I'd use them in my games), you do good eyes. As far as improvement, practice, practice, practice and bob around on the various forums for new techniques, find some good ones then try them out. keep up the good work!

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Welcome to the boards. As all other already said: Great stuff!! You minis show a good brush control and also the surface is smooth. Eyes turned out great. The next step should be outlining (if you don't know what it is, just ask) and highlighting and shading and try to take better pictures because your's are so dark and yellowish that it is hard to judge the paintjob. Maybe you did already some highlighting, but I can't say it from the pictures.

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Here's some pictures of another mini Jat made for me - 03094: Maralise Moonscythe, Druid. Pictures taken last week, working on better picture techniques for next time.

 

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To get an idea of the improvement she made in about a weeks time (and after finding some tutorials on these boards and getting her ear talked off by the guy who runs the local hobby shop), here's a shot of the first version she did.

 

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As far as the time issue is concerned, I'd say 6 to 7 hours is about the average *minimum* time I spend on a mini for a tabletop quality job. I'm something of a slow painter, generally speaking, so some things take longer for me than others, but then again I'm sure I paint faster than some others. NOTE: There is *no* such thing as a standard time frame for painting a mini - it will vary wildly based on the amount of detail and how many colors you use, the complexity and size of the figure, how convoluted the folds on the clothing are, etc... It's all a matter of how much time you want to put into it. I've done one or two where I spent about six hours mixing paints to get the right shades. Like paintminion said, it's done pretty much when you can live with the difference between the list of things you'd *like* to tweak on the figure and the list of things you *can* sucessfully tweak on it. It's done when it's done. (stands on head and chants Ohm.) ::D:

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