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Some Newb questions.


mercoutlaw
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I'm still waiting on my order to hit my local game store, so I don't have the full rules yet, but I do have the QS and unit cards. My questions are:

 

1.) I understand the general concept of combat, but how do you determine the defensive value, how much damamge is taken, and what your base to hit modifier is?

 

2.) Do the air gunships function like normal units, not like say Aerospace units in CBT? I really hate how they play!

 

3.) What is the common point size for a standard game?

 

4.) I noticed this is not a hex board game, but most pictures are of units on hex bases. Is this a requirement for tournament play?

 

5.) Not so much a rules question, but does the CAV universe use dropships and warships? Just curious.

 

Thanks in advance for answers!

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Common point size is around 2,000 to 3,000, usually averaging around a 2,500 point game a lot of the time. You can play smaller games if time is an issue (want to get done in one to two hours or so) but 2,500 points can play fast also, or it can take a little time depending on terrain and how each player plays their forces.

 

Air units function as normal units, they move, shoot etc the same as other models for the most part.

 

There are dropships, warships in some of the fluff and over at Mil-Net there's even directions to build your own Herc dropship if you want. :)

 

Hex bases are not a requirement in the core rules (if memory serves) but almost all of the models are best served on a base, keeps them nice and flat without the chance of tipping over and ruining your paint job.

 

The defensive value is shown on the data cards, for example look at the Dictator 60 from the Open Market cards. It's DV is 11, that means its defensive number is 11, we'll use the Despot right next to it in the Data Cards as the opponent. It has a DV of 13 but you want to look at the RAV (Range Attack Value) for each, that's found by looking at each weapons system. For the Dictator, it has a RAV of 1 for each of its GC (Gauss Cannons). On the data card they are shown as GC and next to it says DA which means Direct Attack, you can only fire either direct attack or indirect not both at the same time (IFM is indirect fire missile system). You also has a modifier called 'piercing' which is used against hard targets like the Despot. So the RAV is 1 and you add the piercing modifier bringing your adjusted attack value to 6 against the Despots 13, you have to roll a 7 or better to inflict damage for each weapon. I forgot to add that you are 18 inches from the Despot, so you are within the first range band (your range is located on the weapon slot next to range. In the Dictators case, the GC's range is (20) meaning 20 inches. We'll not worry about range modifiers right now. So you roll a pair of D10's and one rolls a 2 and another rolls an 8, you would inflict 1 point of damage on the Despot. Damage is tracked with damage dice (use a d6) to show how many points you have taken. So that Despot you inflicted one point of damage on is on DT1 (everyone starts at DT0) which will effect his movement and DV values after the section that is attacking him is done. Best part of CAV is now that you inflicted a point of damage, your opponent gets to shoot back at you! Defensive fire can be taken whether you are hit or not, the fact that you were shot at is what triggers defensive fire in a CAV.

 

To go further with that same example let's say you declare you will fire all your direct weapons at the Despot, so you have a pair of GC's and a Direct Fire Missile pack aimed at him. You roll 3 D10's and get a 1, a 0 and an 8. That means you missed with one GC shot, hit the second with a possible crit and hit with the DFM. You roll again for crit and again roll a 0 (man, you're on a roll!) so that means you give the Despot 2 points of damage for your original rolls and another 3 points for the crit. He's now suffered 5 points of total damage bringing him to his 4th DT (the 0 track is where you start from), you've almost toasted him in your first go 'round. :)

 

That's a very basic breakdown of how it works without any ECM defensive values or EST targeting assistance being brought to bear. The data cards may seem a bit weird to look at for the beginning but it makes a lot of sense after you play a little and what seems like a bunch of weird numbers really paints a very simple and easy to understand picture. Is there anyone close to you who plays or is a Black Lightning member that could give you a demo?

 

Hope that helps and isn't too confusing, don't hesitate to ask any questions you have! :)

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You'll create a Task Force based on points and the task force creation rules. For example let's say you have an Armor Section and a Specialist Section, you have two sections that will be represented by two playing cards (poker cards). Your opponent will have the same amount of cards as he fields sections, you put them in a pile and shuffle. Draw a card and whomevers card it is can activate a section, you place your section anywhere in the area you designate as a deployment zone no further than 6 inches from the tables edge. Each card is drawn until you place all of your sections, then you shuffle the cards again and draw. Now you will activate those sections you have placed on the board based on card draws, this gives you the initiative. Do this for each section until you've completed activations and repeat. Hope that makes sense.

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Mostly, yes. But what does "section" dictate? Unit, or say lance or company? That's the only part that's confusing to me. By the way the other threads were incredibly helpful!

 

The hex question was basically to determine if I had to base them on hex's or if I could use round bases, I would never not base a unit, I love doing up nice terrain bases! Thanks again, I hope I don't become annoying, I am just very eager to learn this game, and learn it correctly! Thanks, again!

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A Section would be the equivilent of a BT Lance, but they're both more strict and more flexible at the same time. There are 9 types of Sections: Armor, Mechanized Infantry, Rifle and Specialist are the Primary Sections. Fire Support, Flight, Morar, Recon and Transport are the Secondary Sections. A Task Force may never have more Secondary Sections that it has Primary ones.

 

Each Model in the game has a Type (CAV, Vehicle, Gunship or Infantry) and a Role (Attack, Fire Support, Recon, Transport or Support), which define its purpose in the game. Each specific Section has its own rules for the number of Models that it can hold, as well as which Types and Roles those Models have to be. For instance, the Armor Section allows for 4-6 Models, but they all must be Type CAV or Vehicle and at least 3 of them have to be Role: Attack. So as I stated before, while Section design rules are strict (hard-coded Types and Roles) they're also flexible enought (variable # of models) to make building your Task Force easier.

 

As for the hex bases - every CAV comes with their own in the blister, as do Infantry and some vehicles. You could mount the minis on round bases if you really wanted to, but it wouldn't be very easy. Every CAV has a large chunck of metal connecting its feet together which is designed to fit inside the recessed hex base for stability. If you put them on a non-recessed base you'd either need to cut the metal off or else build up the base around it to cover it up. Also, the majority of the Super-Heavy CAVs are larger than their hex bases, their feet just hang off the sides and the metal connecter is what really attaches them to the base. Depending on the size of the other bases you want to use, you might have trouble mounting those.

 

There are some rules aspects to consider though. While bases (of any kind) are not required for game play, they do make things run much more smoothly. If you were to play with no bases or non-Reaper bases, anytime you or your opponent were attempting to determine base to base contact you'd have to pull out the tape measures and get Rules Lawyer-y. Having hex bases that you can simply put edge to edge can help clear up a lot of potential arguments.

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I planned to use hex bases, especially since they actually come with them, as opposed tos ome other games minis. So, basically a section is a pre-determined group of units that work in unison...perfect that's exactly what I needed to know! ANd there is a card in each 'initiaive' deck that represents these units randomly. Well, I'm starting to get the jist! Can't wait to paint up some minis and get to playing!

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Each card represents you as a player, it's your choice which unit to activate for each card pulled. That's one of the areas where the tactical depth and flexibility really shine through, you choose who goes when not the cards. The cards only choose which player gets the chance to activate a unit.

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Thank you! That's exactly what I needed to know. I'm sure more things will make sense when my full rulebook gets here, but I really wanted some concrete ideas from veteran players so that it made sense! Thanks again for all the helpful replies, it is most appreciated!

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