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Mac vs. PC


Baphomet69
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Mac's biggest problem for most home users (which is odd - since they stand the most to loose because of it) is the lack of game support. There are still many games which are built extensively to use DirectX and never have a version which does not require DirectX. These puts Mac and Linux machines right out. Although there are other technologies which can be used besides DirectX - none are quite as slick and easy for the developer, so you don't see much effort in development for them (quite often the Mac version is completed a year or more after the normal version). Most of the problems that I have dealt with in regards to Macs and home users are related to games and related issues (games that are supposed to be compatible, but were never fully tested - or that require an Intel Mac in order to run).

 

Wait a minute. You're blaming the gaming industry's refusal to build games that don't require DirectX on Apple?

 

 

There are a few companies that don't do this. Blizzard is one. In fact, my Mac runs World of Warcraft much better than my Windows based PC ever did.

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Well I gave up Macs after OSX came out. I felt like I had child locks on. Windows isn't amazing, but it gets the job done. Besides, Macs only difference in performance was the PowerPC and that was falling behind so much they switched to x86. Now, there's almost 0 hardware difference between the two and I can get a machine that's much better than what apple will sell me for way less. I'm getting into graphic design, 3D, and animation and for less $1k I can build a massive workstation compared to anything Apple can give me, it's more of the ascetics than what's running it that will sell it, that and OSX.

 

Also here's something interesting on the games situation... Valve owner Gabe Newell said recently that Apple would approach them and Valve would be excited to work with Apple, then those people from Apple disappear and new ones saying the same thing show up and it repeats.

It adds a lot of weight to the idea that Apple is the one who isn't doing jack.

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I've been a liftime PC user, in an all-PC office (and a PC only industry, really), and when my office wanted a DVD player and media center computer, I weighed the pro's and cons and decided to go with a mac mini.

 

It was a revelation. OS X is so bleedin' elegant, I'm in love.

 

Long story short, the boss couldn't figure out how to use it, because it was just different enough from the PC experience he was used to.

 

But for a personal computer, the mac experience is worth it. Have problems? Free support at the apple store, just make an appointment. Nice people. Good product.

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Well I gave up Macs after OSX came out. I felt like I had child locks on.

Child locks? When you can drop into the UNIX command line at any time by bringing up a command window?

 

Now, there's almost 0 hardware difference between the two and I can get a machine that's much better than what apple will sell me for way less. I'm getting into graphic design, 3D, and animation and for less $1k I can build a massive workstation compared to anything Apple can give me, it's more of the ascetics than what's running it that will sell it, that and OSX.

An apples to oranges comparison. Yes, you can build a machine cheaper than you can buy one from Apple. But you can make the same comparison against Dell, HP, Alienware, etc. Fitting out a similarly equipped machine at Dell vs. one at Apple, the cost difference isn't so stark.

 

For some the design and user experience does matter. And some people are willing to pay for it, and some aren't. And, that's okay: we don't all have to buy the same computer! ::):

 

Ron

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I've dealt with PC's my whole computing life after getting started on an Apple IIe. Back when I was working at Toys R Us corporate, our advertising department used MAC's and I absolutely hated working on them, from a support standpoint they made no sense. After working on them enough I was able to get around but found the interface (forget which OS it was at the time, this was back in 2002 and before) very confusing and was always getting lost. We didn't get many calls for support from them so I worked on them only every so often, so that added to a lack of familiarity. I'll always be a PC person, as much flak as Windows receives and PC hardware receives, you can't beat the price and flexibility in my opinion. Good luck with your MAC if you get one!

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I hate the way those Mac commercials make PC's look like total pieces of crap.

 

I hate them because PC is so lovable and the Mac is such a trendy jerkwad. There is something about Justin Long that makes me want to punch him in the face. He stands for everything I hate in most of the trendy mac owners that I hate. You know.. the smug ones in the over priced coffee shop with their shiny mac and ipod that they never actually do anything with, but purchased them because it is simply a lifestyle accessory? It is funny because John Hodgeman is a total mac fan ;)

 

The british ads with Mitchell and Webb are even worse, to be honest, because PC is that much more lovable and Mac is that much more smug.Charlie Brooker of The Guardian says about the commercials and the duo - "PCs are a bit rubbish yet ultimately lovable, whereas Macs are just smug, preening tossers." I couldn't agree more.

 

Seriosuly - I want to buy a PC after watching those commercials.

Edited by SaintRigger
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PCs are fine. As long as you are running a decent OS. Like Linux.

 

Come on, a decently patched XP with appropriate windows defender and AV software is fine.. (This isn't sarcasm, BTW) You can run OSX on a PC as well, there are quite a few projects. I rather like Linux myself - again, if it wern't for the gaming, I'd have switched this PC over to Linux (and if it wern't for the money, I'd have replaced with with a 24" imac)

 

 

I did read a great tongue in cheek article about a user who "upgraded" his machine from Vista to XP.

http://dotnet.org.za/codingsanity/archive/...windows-xp.aspx

 

This year has been a bad year for OS releases. Vista is a seriously huge disappointment, and I've been really disappointed with 10.5 and some of apple's recent patches the last business quarter. I'm stuck in a situation right now where one of their patches breaks some of my 10.4 machines and their solution is to upgrade to 10.5, which I'd love to do but windows networking is broken. As much as I adore apple, it isn't all roses.

 

A machine is simply a tool, it is really up to a user what they do with it based on their needs. For me, I find an intel mac with both OSX and Windows XP is the best option as I like the OSX interface, I love the power afforded by having a unix base under the hood and I like the fact that I rarely have to worry about tweaking drivers, malware, viruses and hardware not working. Things plug in, they work. My OS works and it is speedy - I can do just about everything, there is a ton of sweet open source software available and when I do need windows - be it to run certain applications or to play games, I can either run it under a virtual machine for the easy things, or dual boot my machine to use the full system resources. My macbook pro has handled everything I've thrown at it, is faster than some of the more expensive dell laptops we have ordered (and PC world finds it to be the fastest Vista laptop available, although I am running XP at the moment on it - http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,136649-p...s/article.html)

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Wait a minute. You're blaming the gaming industry's refusal to build games that don't require DirectX on Apple?

 

There are a few companies that don't do this. Blizzard is one. In fact, my Mac runs World of Warcraft much better than my Windows based PC ever did.

 

A long time ago (well around 7-8 years ago - ancient in terms of computing) I worked for a company in Austin who were in the business of making games. I worked backend and tools development (backend for the servers and tools for the 3D software - level editors, and animation support). One of the owners was a Mac fanatic and insisted that their AAA title debut be cross platform compatible from day one. We dealt with Apple on a near daily basis, trying to work with them to deal with connectivity issues, hardware issues, performance issues - and they were a nightmare. At the time they kept trying to push off or say that this or that needed to be done in order to do what we wanted on the Apple machine (which didn't work in the end - and caused us to chase down weeks of code rewrites in order to find out it wouldn't work). Not to mention they were playing very close to the chest with information regarding their upcoming OS X - and the idea of developing for one OS and then dealing with a switch shortly after the projected launch didn't appeal to any of us who would actually have to make it work.

 

By comparison, we had excellent support through Microsoft, MSDN and the DirectX package. Tools were a breeze and everything worked the way it was supposed to. If we had a problem - we actually were able to get an answer from the programmers at Microsoft as opposed to the sales reps at Apple. When a technician recommends using Java to deal with anything that is already performance intensive (they recommended we use Java to handle client/server communication) they are obviously clueless when it comes to programming.

 

In the end, the money ran out before the project went Gold. While the primary problem was a micromanaging twit who thought that Macs were the be all end all of computing, but the fact that Apple didn't support the software developer went a long way as well. In the end - for all the flogging that Microsoft gets regarding "proprietary" programming...Microsoft loves it's developers. Apple - not so much.

 

Sure it was a few years ago - but I still know a lot of people who are still working for various games companies who will not touch Apples until they produce an API that will work with games, and they do not have to worry about updates and changes (too many have been burned by minor patches and upgrades which break the software).

 

PCs are fine. As long as you are running a decent OS. Like Linux.

 

I don't think I have ever had a crash or other problem with any of my computers - and I run 2000 on most my computers (along with two servers running Linux, one box running 98SE for those old school games and two gaming computers running XP). Anti-virus software handles the software issues - my router/firewall handles the rest. When I need to, I update software...though most of it isn't an issue. Microsoft is definitely not a perfect company - but Apple is far more the evil empire from my experience.

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I made the switch after my PC repetitiously crashed. I was a little slow at reprogramming my mind to understand OSX and now love the Mac. (I have a Powerbook G4.) My wife who has a much lower patience level with learning new programs has now come around and also loves the Powerbook and OSX because of its ease to understand, once you take the initiative to understand the differences. I have been quite chagrined at the low offering of great games, but now that the new OS is out along with Boot Camp and the new Power PCs, why not switch? If you are going to drop a couple grand on a computer get the best of both worlds.

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I ran a well-patched Win2000 for years and had not one problem with it. I then upgraded to XP (set up to act as much like 2000 as I could make it) and have had one problem, that being a firewall that imploded- but collateral damage was minimal.

 

Vista is a different kettle of fish. I bought a simple consumer laptop with that dog of an OS on it, and it has been nothing but grief- for me. My wife, whose laptop it is, doesn't seem too worried though.

 

Apart from a faulty RAM stick over 6 years ago, I have never had any kind of crash/lockup problems with any of my PCs.

 

I'm just sayin'.

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Viruses can still be an issue on Macs, so it's a good idea to get a virus package for Macs.

 

you are out of license compliance and if a MS Gestapo Agent wanted to kick in your door, they'd have every right)

 

First, viruses: EVERYONE, and I mean EVERYONE, needs a good AV program, and needs to KEEP IT UP TO DATE. I'm sicking of having my email addresses compromised by clueless slackjaws who are unwitting lackeys of organized crime. Thanks for your carelessness.

 

Second, I assume this is supposed to be hyperbole, but as evil as M$ is, they have no right to kick in your door for licensing violations.

 

Finally, back to the thread: one of the big reasons to get a Mac today is to avoid Vista. I've been using it for a year, becuase as an IT pro I need to keep up with the curve, but I'm considering moving it to a virtual machine because the list of things I *can't* do on Vista far outweighs the list of things I *can* do in Vista (on the exact same machine). I have 13 boxes and several virtual machines. A year after release, I only run Vista on one of them, and that may even change.

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