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travel cases for supplies


haldir
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I thought I'd add this one here, for ideas & such.

 

Even thou Reaper hq is the spot for paints & such, I'm gonna bring my own paints, thou not as many I did last year (way to many!!). Anyone have anything portable? Pretty much to shove into a suitcase or similar bag.

 

Funny, in 05 I went down there with a clear lid tool case with most of the RM line in it, wouldn't even get pass the first check point now :blink:

 

Thanks for any ideas.

RM

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Depends if you want to carry on or not.

 

If you want to carry on, you're pretty much limited to what can fit in a clear, quart sized zip lock bag (for liquids) and no sharp pointy things.

 

For check in bags, I'd use a deep Plano case (about the same size as the Reaper paint case).

 

Ron

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I checked mine last year and had no problems. I was worried about TSA futzing with stuff, but I just taped a note to the outside of the plano case stating what was in it, that it was used for miniature hobbies, and buried it in the middle of the clothes to insulate from tempurature extremes. Although my bag was randomly searched I don't think anyone rifled through my paint case. Just the same I think I will be bringing a smaller collection than I did last year though. Never ended up touching most of them and now I need to save space in my bags for my snazzy new laptop. ::D:

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Honestly, I've found it's best to pack light, not bring much more than some palettes and my brushes (along with a few pieces to show instructors so they know how you're painting-this REALLY helps if you want tips on improving). My experience has been that I come home with more than I go with and, when flying, I have to be careful with weight restrictions because of the pewter.....I've found that pretty much everything I need is there, if I didn't bring something I need, I can buy it, and I NEVER spend as much time painting as I think I will.

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Been awhile since I have flown to a convention (normally I drive) - but when I did...I would ship my stuff UPS to wherever I was going/staying. Same thing for the return trip. Costs a few bucks more, but you don't have to deal with luggage getting lost or curious security people...or hauling stuff through the airports and what not.

 

Call your hotel and tell them what you want to do. They will give you instructions on how to mark your packages and what not. When you check in, grab your package and enjoy. Same thing when you get ready to leave. You can send a whole lot of pewter and paints for under $20 via UPS.

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I have adopted Jennifer's idea, which is to cut out cardboard inserts to fit a gallon ziplock bag and then lay out the paints in rows on the cardboard in there. The cardboard keeps the thing stiff and square so you can stack numerous bags atop each other, very space-efficient, and with the right size cardboard it's a snug fit so the paints stay ordered and in place. The clear bag allows the TSA to look at what's there easily. I've never had an issue with this. I also do what's suggested above and on any non-transparent case (like the ones for painted models) I'll write a clear description of what's inside and also a "Fragile! Small Pieces, Please Be Careful" note. ::):

 

I fly with my supplies often and this has worked fine...so far!

 

--Anne

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One thing to remember about travelling with paints:

 

Changes in altitude.

 

If you are using the dropper bottles, and you are going to open them at higher altitude than where you last closed them, make sure they've been upright for a while. Then slowly open them (before shaking) to let the higher pressure air to escape. If you shake them first, that high pressure air bubble is below paint, and the paint will squirt out of your bottle as the air tries desperately to escape.

 

Denton is at 662 ft elevation. If the difference in elevation from Denton to where you live is more than a few hundred feet, you're going to have to worry about this either once you arrive, or once you get back.

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One thing to remember about travelling with paints:

 

Changes in altitude.

 

If you are using the dropper bottles, and you are going to open them at higher altitude than where you last closed them, make sure they've been upright for a while. Then slowly open them (before shaking) to let the higher pressure air to escape. If you shake them first, that high pressure air bubble is below paint, and the paint will squirt out of your bottle as the air tries desperately to escape.

 

Denton is at 662 ft elevation. If the difference in elevation from Denton to where you live is more than a few hundred feet, you're going to have to worry about this either once you arrive, or once you get back.

 

Yeah, I learned about that the hard way. <_<

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