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Meet my wife, uuhh, I mean my sister...


kristof65
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I think there is both a cultural factor and a genetic factor involved. I beleive our base instincts to not "breed" with one of our own blood are strengthed by our cultural conditioning to avoid the same.

 

My guess is that the two of them "clicked" when they first met, and not realizing it was the fact they were siblings, probably felt they had found their "soulmate." I'll bet they felt close, but that they both had the nagging feeling something was "wrong" with their marriage. The later realization that it was the fact they were brother and sister probably made a lot of things make sense, and the entire dynamic of their relationship changed. Unlike a lot of divorced couples, they will probably remain close friends, and significant people in each others lives. Of course without the two of them coming forward to tell their story, I doubt we'll ever know.

 

Though I do think that explaining the whole previous relationship thing to new girlfriends/boyfriends would be VERY ackward. I mean, how would you like to be introduced to your new girlfriend's ex-husband/brother?

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I felt sorry for them. It's hard enough trying to find someone you "click" with normally; but, to find that person, hook up with 'em, and then find out it's your own sister/brother. I imagine if they're like "normal" people, at least like Americans, they have a bit of mental anguish/guilt going on.

 

What a serious bummer. Wonder if they'll really stay apart, or end up back together somehow.

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Can't argue with odd! It seems like most of the "oddness" would come from having grown up with someone. Just because you happen to be biologically connected to someone doesn't mean you necessarily have a real emotional attachment. You said yourself that you have nothing to do with your biological mother. Most people consider it "odd" not to talk to their parents, but it happens. Couldn't it just as easily happen the opposite way? I prefer to think biology should be left out of who you think are the most important people in life is all I'm saying.

 

It's all pretty much a moot point though. They decided it was too weird or whatever and that's that. The odds of it happening just this one time would have to be pretty astronomical. Kind of fun to think about, but I don't see writing a book about how to deal with marrying your sibling separated at birth or anything...

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I read about this last week. Personally, I think knowing about your family history is crucial in a world full of carcinogens, heart disease, and any number of neurological disorders. If you don't know what you might be prone to, how can you ever take steps to prevent it, or hope to catch it early enough to cure it?

 

I don't, however, buy the argument that the possibility of siblings unwittingly dating or marrying is a comparatively good argument for the release of information. At least not to the extent that parliamentary fellow in the article I read was going on about it.

 

I mean, really, what are the odds? Yes, I know it happened in this case, but out of how many millions (MILLIONS AND MILLIONS!) of cases?

 

The better argument is the matter of health and family medical history, I think. That alone, should settle the matter. I mean, thay don't put a bandaid on your thumb until you've filled out a form swearing your mother never had diabetes. Why then, don't they inform a person of his natural family's history of cancer or heart disease?

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I read this a week or so back in our daily paper and feel so bad for the two of them, From what i know they didn't marry straight away and fell in love as any normal couple would. So to find out they was related must be the worst feeling in the world.

On the subject of abortion this can be argued in every way. I personally don't like the idea of splitting twins / brothers sisters up, I'm an identical twin with my brother and know of the bond that we share.

 

I read that the chances of siblings meeting each other without knowing who they are is something like 1 in 10,000,000 and the chance that a brother / sister actually falling in love without knowing they are related is considerably less. Sounds dodge but if you think about it, they share the same genetic make up so the chances are they are gonna be looking for the same thing in a partner and probably have the same interests as each other.

 

I suppose though that when children are separated its up to the foster parents to agree with each other if they should tell the kids that they have siblings or not, but thats a subjective opinion and no doubts people will either agree or disagree with it. Either way i think people have the right to know where they come from and if they have any relations of their own blood. It could stop this thing from happening again.

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Seeing as how my family is more known for how many relatives we don't talk to than relatives we do talk to, it's never been that much of a surprise that I've got a few 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cousins lurking in the weeds. So there's a distinct possibility that I'm related to a lot more people than even I'm aware of because the splits in the family trees for both my parents happened well before I was born (in my Dad's case, before his dad was born).

 

Thankfully, my brother's father-in-law is a geneology nut as well as my Dad's cousins so a lot of family is known even if we don't talk to them. Honestly? Our little family shrub (9 members strong if you count Dad's ex-wife) is doing just fine without all the other pesky relatives and who knows.. maybe one day the shrub will be a good-sized tree of it's own ::):

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I'm sad they didn't stay together. I don't really see what the big deal is... Not that I have a cousin I want to marry or anything, but inbreeding isn't always a bad thing. It can amplify negative genetic traits, but it can do the same for positive traits. I don't all that much about it, but most inbreeding issues come about from generations of inbreeding, not a one time pairing. Either way, it's not like they couldn't have adopted kids assuming they even wanted kids. I'm sure it was more of a psychological issue than a genetics issue for the two of them.

 

I just think it's sad that they found each other, liked one another enough to get married, and then called it off because of genetics. You can't choose your family, but you can choose your friends, and I think those are the ones that really count anyway.

 

I just re-read that and remembered about the old kings and queens of Europe who exchanged kids with other kings and queens from places like France and Germany, even my queen's blood has traces of inbreeding in it (they say they are blue blooded lol). Do you really think prince Charles ear size is that natural?

But its kinda..... Ewww for family members to get in to things like that, even if they are not oblivious to it.

But their story is a sad one indeed.

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I believe the Rockefeller's are a more modern instance of successful inbreeding. Not to say the Royal Family isn't modern, I just think they got a lot of their close marriages out of the way a while ago. If I remember right there were at least a few first cousin marriages in the Rockefeller's. I've heard it suggested that they were so successful because of good genes for intelligence. I dunno! Not really my area of expertise or even interest, but I have watched at least one documentary involving inbreeding and read a couple articles and people who know more than me have said it's not always a bad thing.

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My old Ex girlfriend once told me that the modern day cheetah are all descendants of each other and connected through blood. I know this sounds off topic but bare with me on it. The reasons they are all blood related is because at some point in their history they almost got wiped out and repopulated them selves in a remote area somewhere in Africa through inbreeding. Now thats all well and good, but the problems with inbreeding is that unlike say humans who have breed with people of different areas through out the world allowing our species new genes which makes us stronger against virus, inbreeding doesn't create these new genes and as a result the cheetah has low genetic variability meaning things like low sperm counts, resulting sometimes in deformities, kinda like when some kids are born with 6 fingers in stead of 4 and a toe etc.

 

A little bit of science for you there.

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