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Drybrushing with my WN Series 7 brush


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Wow. The softness & fineness of the bristles on the WN Series 7 brush is allowing me to paint the high spots on finely serrated features like never before.

 

I always thought it was my paint being the wrong consistancy, but it was the brush.

 

I don't think its hurting it any, since I'm using nicely thinned, wet paint and most of the strokes are with the sides, except for really fine lines like feathers.

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If I were to even think of using one of my W&N brushes for drybrushing it would be because it was worn and needed to be replaced. Otherwise I would not use it for that purpose. Yes I can see where the paint would lay down better drybrushing with it. Cost-wise however I would be finding a cheap knock-off sable brush to be doing the drybrushing with.

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Yeah, I figure there haven't been too many replies to this thread because most readers have fainted away in shock at the thought. ;-> I have a few dud W&N brushes I use for wetbrushing and similar stuff. I'm lousy at drybrushing, I'd really like to sit down with someone who's good at it and watch what they do, paint consistency and so on.

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BLASPHEMY!!!!

 

Oh, wait, public forum . . . .

 

It didn't sound like you were actually drybrusing. Keeping everything wet kinda helps keep the destruction of the bristles down to a minimum.

 

Real drybrushing involves getting paint on the brush, then wiping most of the paint off so your brush is "dry" except for some of the pigment. The brush would almost feel dry to the touch.

 

If that's what you're doing, eek, I'd stop. $15-$20 for a new brush isn't worth it. Drybrushing is a lot harder on the bristles than normal painting. And remember: Some weasel in Siberia gave up his butt hair for that brush! Treat it with respect! :)

 

To Wren: If you still haven't found a good drybrushing technique by the time GenCon rolls around, I'll sit with ya. Most of the 20 years I've been painting have been with a drybrush technique, and I have the dozens of ruined brushes to prove it!

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Yeah, if it's mostly drawing the side of the brush along to tops of the ridges of the hair that's not really drybrushing ::D:. Most people teach that trick in their classes for both hair and hard edges, like when you're trying to put a line on a sword blade or armor piece. If you're mainly doing actual drybrushing on feathers the detail on them is usually shallow, so you won't wear out the brush too quick, but you'll still slowly abuse all the nice features you like out of the brush. If you were getting paint running down in to the cracks before I'd say it was a function of your paint being too thin, or not wiping enough of it off on a towel before drybrushing.

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Wow. The softness & fineness of the bristles on the WN Series 7 brush is allowing me to paint the high spots on finely serrated features like never before.

 

W&N 7s for drybrushing? :blink:

 

Do you have rolls of gold leaf in your bathroom instead of toilet paper? Can you take photos and share with the class? I didn't know such decadence existed. ;)

 

More seriously, I guess if it works for you - I tear up my brushes fast enough without drybrushing with them - I don't really want to think of what would happen to them if I did.

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If that's what you're doing, eek, I'd stop. $15-$20 for a new brush isn't worth it. Drybrushing is a lot harder on the bristles than normal painting. And remember: Some weasel in Siberia gave up his butt hair for that brush! Treat it with respect! :)

 

As long as you make sure to give the brush a good cleaning and conditioning after use - it will hold up just fine with dry brushing too. I'm not too terribly picky with which brush I use to dry brush with - and I can't think of one which was damaged due to dry brushing. Normally I end up replacing brushes because I rotate them into glue brushes - not because they were worn out, but because I need a glue brush and to keep things simple I generally don't buy brushes specifically for that.

 

Personally though, for dry brushing I like the paint holding qualities of sable over synthetics for my style of dry brushing (more paint, lighter touch). When you are using a practically dry brush - synthetics are nice since the paint slides off more easily, and you can use a heavier hand. That heavy hand though will cost you in brushes in the long run.

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I neither fainted nor felt any sort of aghast-type feeling, I'd have to say my reaction was along the lines of 'And?' :devil:

 

Was hoping for some good insights on dry-brushing or perhaps some pictures of quality difference. A $10 brush is nothing to sneeze at, but really.. they last a LONG time if you take care of them. Even longer if you seldom use them. :poke:

 

Afterall... it's only Russian weasel butt fur ::P:

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MMMM Ruining a perfectly good WNS7 brush for drybrushing. Seriously the best all time brush to use for drybrushing is ye olde white handle black bristle $.99 Testors paint brush. Yes sir it can plow through any army and keep on ticking. My testor white handle is about 15 years old and full of awesome and win. Really this brush is best for mass painting operations involving GW figures that will be chilling on a table.

 

Wren I will be happy to be one of many to show you the whole wide world of dry brushing if you would like, and I'll be at ReaperCon to.

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Speaking of brush care:

 

I use what ever hair conditioner we have around the house after I clean everything I can from the brush. This seems to keep the curl from occuring. At the curl point I normally use an old text book/crappy novel and close the book around the bristles, and as a last resort i will trim the bristles with ye old exacto...

 

What other ways do you folks have for maintaining your chosed tools of destruction? short of buying or replacing them...

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Its only a $10 brush... what's wrong with spending ten bucks for a tool that does a specialized job very well?

 

Only that you can spend alot less for a brush that does the job equally well.

 

Also, don't expect to be able to use it for regular painting after you've been abusing it.

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