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How to blend by olliekickflip


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Very helpful tutorial, thanks a lot for sharing. I especially like the idea of starting at 75% of your highlight color and shading down, definitely a lot easier than basecoating right in the middle. Anyway, as someone else has said, I also run into chalky highlights sometimes. Usually it's when I have a lot of white added to the paint mix. You mentioned poor technique, but I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. At first I thought the paint wasn't thinned enough, and adding more dilution does help, but it still causes problems here and there. Do you have any tips for finding out what exactly we're doing wrong? Thanks.

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A great read, I can't wait to read it a few more times then try what you've explained.

 

One thing that's a bit confusing. When you talk about percentages you aren't specific. By reading the parts over again I figured you were talking about, for example, 60% water and 40% color but it would be very helpful if you pointed that out specifically. I hate to assume =)

 

Thanks!

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Hey Morganm, its always more water than color unless your doing freehand. Again though the percentages are just there to get you started. My persentages change throughout the paintjob. Sometimes I need more water and sometimes less, thats were experience comes in handy. Just keep watching what your paints do and dont be afraid to really screw it up!

 

@ dougrob173: OK barring changing paint, I would suggest a couple of tests.

1. Less water

2. More water

3. Slower buildup of lighter colors from your median color. (in other words, dont go from Blue to white quickly)

4. Change paints (not your entire collection, just that one)

5. Do some really light glazes (90% water to 10% pigment) You can use either your median color or one of your darker shades (sometimes using your darker shades will give you a real richness to your lighter colors without "changing" the hue) Make sure your glazes are really thin...DO NOT LET IT POOL!

Not only does it add richness to the color and tie in your blends but it may also help get rid of that chalky look. (if it does, please tell me it worked!!!)

 

Oh, and on another note, I would suggest getting a pair of those opti-visor ultra geek magnifier headsets. That or a pair of 3x or 4x reading glasses if you can find them. When you look at a model through these, it is really discouraging at first. You see all the mistakes...all the bad blends. Soon though, you will get used to them and your painting will improve quite a bit to the point where you only wear them at the end to make sure you didn't miss anything! I have also found that watching what my paint was doing through magnification really did help me understand what was going on with the piment and thus be able to control it better!

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A great read, I can't wait to read it a few more times then try what you've explained.

 

One thing that's a bit confusing. When you talk about percentages you aren't specific. By reading the parts over again I figured you were talking about, for example, 60% water and 40% color but it would be very helpful if you pointed that out specifically. I hate to assume =)

 

Thanks!

 

 

Moganm...pianting is very objective...OKF can tell you specifically what he's doing, but not every mini is the same, and not every blend it the same. Your percentages may vary based on previous coats. Like he said, don't be afraid to play with the combinations, and remember it's generally easier to add more layers, than take some off!

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Very nice tutorial. I am learning this technique as well and it gave me a few more tips and pointers.

I just can't work out how to use a wet palette, I am using a ceramic tile which works excellent for me. I am fighting against the chalky look in the highlights too. A few remarks about this:

Olie it helps to do many super thin glazes to get rid of most of the chalky look. At least for me. I am still experimenting what color to use best (mid tone, highlight or shade).

I have read somewhere (these forums or minipainter list) that the chalkiness is a property of the white used in our paint, this is titanium white. I was advised to experiment with zinc white, which is another color in an artist palette. Zinc white is a transparent white which covers less then titanium white.

I hope to get on with this the coming weekend

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Corect me if i'm wrong. You are doing blends with less thined paint then basecoat? You said that basecoating is don with a 60-70% water to paint mix, and blends with 40-50%. Or just i didn't understood it... Yes I'm a dork too, and my girlfriend is saying the same.... even my 14m old little son thinks that (*gosh*) :)

 

And it would be much more usefull if the thining "formulas" would be count in drops rather than percentage.

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Thinning cannot be measured by drops since it is dependent of color, paint batch and paint brand.

What I do is keep a few practice minis around which I strip regularly and just give it back a basecoat. I test my thinned paint on these minis before I start on the actual mini that I am painting. I stop thinning when the chalky look is gone, but this is most of the time a very high thinning. The first layer is barely visible but allows me to gradually build up

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I know that thining depends on what color You're using, but saying how many drops of water You have put to the paint, rather then giving percentage of the mix, can give the idea of how much water is in it. When i read 10,15,20 drops of water to one of paint i can imagin the proportions. As Ollie said, thining is personal expirience that depends on many things and giving exact recipe is hard task but counting drops of water can give ppl the basics of thining.

 

Hope You understand my poor laguage and lack of english skills

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@ Inferno: yes, my basecoat paint is more thinned than my blending coats. I find that I need a little more pigment to get results when I'm blending. As for percentages, I just threw that out there. I personally use brush fulls of water. I put one brush full of paint on my pallet and then like say for base coating, I do 3 to 4 brush fulls of water. For blending I add one to two brush fulls. If I need a little more water, I just do the tip of my brush. I prefer the brush method as I can get more control of how much water is put into the mix. This is something you will have to observe for yourself and see what works. If the drop method is what works for you, try 4 to 5 drops of water per drop of paint for your basecoat and 2 to 3 drops of water per drop of paint for blending. Thats my best guess at it at least!

 

 

 

Oh, and remember, there are no stupid questions...if you have a question, ask it! I will answer!!!

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A great read, I can't wait to read it a few more times then try what you've explained.

 

One thing that's a bit confusing. When you talk about percentages you aren't specific. By reading the parts over again I figured you were talking about, for example, 60% water and 40% color but it would be very helpful if you pointed that out specifically. I hate to assume =)

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

Moganm...pianting is very objective...OKF can tell you specifically what he's doing, but not every mini is the same, and not every blend it the same. Your percentages may vary based on previous coats. Like he said, don't be afraid to play with the combinations, and remember it's generally easier to add more layers, than take some off!

 

 

 

Right, and I totally agree. However I have to know what the percentages are as a reference point. From there I'll adjust as needed.

 

Thanks!

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Oh, another way to get away from the "chalky" texture that white paint leaves is don't use white.

I tend to stick with a nice bone color or differet pastels. Now you are probably thinking exactally what I thought when someone told me the same thing. "But I need it to be white to really make the paintjob POP" This is where the proper use of shading comes in. If you shade properly, you can make almost any color "POP". Now I'm not saying you can't use white to lighten your color, just don't go all the way to white. A perfect example of this is to go to a museum and look at the artwork on display. Look at old period pieces, knights of armor and such. Rarely do the artist go all the way to white. Even when they paint white, it is not pure white! That being said, I don't paint with anything pure black either. Again, this is something to kind of get used to but once you master...its so nice!!! ::D:

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Great tutorial, well written and easy to understand, can't wait to give it a try. I was wondering though, would it be possible for you to maybe do another and use another model that we all can get our hands on? Kind of like a paint along tutorial? That would be super.

 

John Lee

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I must say that chalkyness is my nightmare... I'v tested white/khaki/bone/ivory/greys/rotting flesh (mainly VGC VMC and GW). It doesn't matter which one i'll pick, it is CHALKY...

 

I think that thining isn't that important in this case (but i do not mean that it isn't at all). The key is the controll of pigments (like Ollie said). I found that pressure of brush is this key. Press it little bit more an You can bound pigments to adhere where You want, not Your brush.

Usualy i did a thin layers by touching mini with only a tip or side of a brush, LAyers of paint were thin anought to dry instantly. Shading wasn't a problem couse it's much more easy to ahive smoothness but highlights where chalky as hell. When i'v read Ollie's tut. i'v startedd to press brush little bit more to force pigment at the end of a stroke.

 

I found that propper pressure gave me some kind of controll. I still have problems with chalky texture and i'm not shure does my discovery is important, so dont take this post as a solution.

 

As i said before, I have to apologize for my poor language skills. I know that probably i'v made many mistakes so please forgive me and correct me.

 

Cheers

Paul

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