Jump to content

how to polish pewter?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 14
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

You might try dropping the minis into Simple Green for a couple of days, scrubbing with a soft toothbrush, and then giving them a light ink or paint wash.

 

I just pulled some minis out of a Simple Green bath. I had put them in in order to strip the gesso experiment off of them, and they came out looking really quite polished and clean looking. I don't think that you have to prime them first, but I haven't tried just the Simple Green bath by itself.

 

Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using a small nylon brush Dremel attachment to polish mine. It came with an old Dremel as part of the accesory kit. I do it as part of paint prep - since we work so hard to have smooth paints, why not start with a smooth mini?

 

They look quite nice when I'm done and there is no loss of detail. It's almost a shame to cover them with that nasty paint :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might not want to stick with an actual polish. While things like polished cups and platters look pretty cool, when you polish something with fine detail...it becomes difficult to actually see the detail.

 

Anywho - if you are looking for a bright metal look still, and you want to do it fast and easy...chemicals. I forget which acid it is, but I use one when doing circuit boards and what not to clean the tin leads before soldering them. Dip the tin in (mini in this case), pull it out, rinse. Bright as a mirrored surface. Most electronics supply houses will carry it (Radio Shack used to...but I doubt it fits there business model anymore).

 

The other ways will work well too - but they will take more time and effort. Remember though, you will still need to manually clean mold lines and other stuff like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once a year or so I just have to disagree with so many otherwise excellent posts and reiterate: I am convinced my suggestion is the best.

 

It's fast, cheap, effective, and does not need polishing compound. I will be adding it to the prep section of my mini guide as I find it so effective. Sorry I don't have a pic to back up my claims.

 

This is the brush I use: http://www.dremel.com/en-us/AttachmentsAnd...il.aspx?pid=403

 

It's less than $3 at Amazon or Tower Hobbies, among others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once a year or so I just have to disagree with so many otherwise excellent posts and reiterate: I am convinced my suggestion is the best.

Then you must have tried all the other methods listed. Except for Joe's chemical dip I have. While the Nylon type brushes work (I have several in diff styles) they only provide one level of abrasive so you are either taking longer to do the job or removing excessive metal to get the high polish effect. That's like using a single stone to sharpen a knife blade. A series of progressively finer abrasives does a better job. Of course cost wise the nylon brush is the cheap way to do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not let one of your store's customers paint it up and put it on display? They would prolly do it for free if you offered to put their name by it in the display.

 

They look much better painted than bare even if it's polished.

 

Another idea is to just do a quick prep of the metal and prime them white. You can see all kinds of detail with white primer. Plus it will stay nice looking and won't tarnish like bare metal will.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Once a year or so I just have to disagree with so many otherwise excellent posts and reiterate: I am convinced my suggestion is the best.

Then you must have tried all the other methods listed. Except for Joe's chemical dip I have. While the Nylon type brushes work (I have several in diff styles) they only provide one level of abrasive so you are either taking longer to do the job or removing excessive metal to get the high polish effect. That's like using a single stone to sharpen a knife blade. A series of progressively finer abrasives does a better job. Of course cost wise the nylon brush is the cheap way to do it.

 

I stand by what I said. The nylon brush I use provides fast, effective polishing with no loss of detail. I'm not trying to sharpen a knife or achieve chromium-like reflectivity, which would be quite difficult given the nature of pewter, I'm talking about something fast, easy, and effective that will allow a shop owner to display extra-nice minis. It's especially relevant since, for me, it's become part of the prep process, and is not some exotic presentation-only process that misrepresents the figure in a way a painter will never see it. I've seen the same look in certain mini catalogs. It's impressive.

 

Besides, a shop owner may sell Dremel accessories, adding a connection between product lines. They won't be selling Simple Green (how is that supposed to affect metal?) or polishing grit.

 

For the record, I have polished more metal (and plastic) and sharpened more knives than the average person, and I stand by what I say. I do appreciate that you are speaking from personal experience as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I polish up figs for my friends storefront I use radial bristle brushes like thrush mentioned, made by 3M. I can take selected parts up to a highly polished reflective surface. Then to bring out the detail I ink the figs, let them dry and surface wipe or lightly buff with felt. Only takes a couple of minutes per model and some clients prefer them to painted figs. If you just want to smooth the surface out the nylon brushes are ok. I use nylon to finish cleaning figs I strip the paint off of before polishing with the 3m brushes. For figure prep the 3m brushes give me the super smooth surface I want especially for flesh and large areas without detail.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...