Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Niceman

Ink extender

Recommended Posts

Ok...my inks and washes are about 2/3 empty so I bought some ink extender.  I haven't used it yet so I thought I'd get some instruction.  The extender is in a normal paint bottle so it doesn't seem like I'd just add it to the bottles of ink.  Ignorance is bliss and I'm feeling pretty good right now so if anyone could fill me in on what to do, I'd appreciate it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh, yes, well the extender actually works by extending the drying time... it doesn't extend the amount in your bottle I'm afraid.

 

Otherwise you use it just like any other extender. I tend to use Floquil's "Slo-dri" on a ratio of 1 part paint, 1 part water, and 1 part extender, but others have different ratios. I tend to paint in extremely thin layers over a white primer. I haven't tried this technique on a black primered mini, yet, so my mixture may change with that color.

 

For washes I tend to thin even more, with perhaps 1 part paint, 2 parts water and 1-2 parts extender, depending on if I'm going to be blending the wash.

 

I also make up on my palette a mix of 50/50 water/extender to use for blending. For me it helps to mix two colors more evenly.

 

Mind, I'm still learning all these new techniques, so my experience thus far may not work for all applications.

 

Also, note, some "ink" extenders may tend to add a gloss to your paint, but Reaper's extender is very good at extending the drying time, giving a person more time to wet-blend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK here is what I have learned from my experience with Reaper inks.  I use the inks a lot and really like them.  Here's how I use them.

 

I primarily use 3 inks, Black, Flesh shading and Wood Shading.  For the mixes I use the following.

 

Black:  1 drop ink to 5 drops extender.  This is what I use for blacklining.  I primarily use the black wash to increase seperation between pieces of a fig or for blacklining armor plates, etc.  Works great on chainmail.

 

Wood:  1 Drop ink to 3 drops extender.

 

Flesh:  1 drop ink to 1-2 drops extender.  

 

As you can see, all the inks seem to react differently to the extender.  The flesh ink really waters down fast, which is why I seldom use it.  I usually mix flesh and wood together for a skintone shading ink.  The extender is the key because not only does it increase drying time, but it helps the ink to flow.  Without it, the ink tends to pool up on the high surfaces.

 

For thinner washes, use a few drops of water to the mix.  For glazes, use a few less drops of extender to get a more opaque wash.

 

Hope this helps.   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the help and suggestions... Now, in the past I've added a capfull of water to a jar of drying paint to revitalize it and continue using it, which works quite well.  Can I do the same with inks or should I write these off and get new bottles?  Right now I think what's left is so concentrated it's dirtying up my miniatures....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm... I don;t know the answer to that one.  I know when I mix up a batch on my pallatte and it congeals, I don't try to thin it back out.  I've noticed it get's muddy and loses it's transparency.  I'd assume that the same would be true for a drying bottle of ink, but I'm just not sure.  

 

I'd try it then do some test washes on a fig or a pallatte or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ink is pigment dissolved in water, not pigment suspended in water.

 

When it dries you may be able to revitalize it with water, but you may have to wait for all the dried ink flakes to dissolve.

 

 

This is why ink is better then thinned paint. You can slather it on, allow it to dry, then rub off the excess with a damp cotton swab. Excellent if you are doing panel lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to add, don't be doing that on a miniature that is for a commission, add future to improve flow, not realizing that it will get rid of the ability to easily rub off the wash because it's essentially a nice smelling clear acrylic paint.

 

Good thing I glosscoated first!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I used some extender to make my own flesh shade ink. The Reaper Flesh shade was a bit too dark (OK for darker skinned folks, but too dark for us palefaces). I used Chestnut Brown at a ratio of 1/4 oz. paint to 1/2 oz. extender, and it turned out fabulous. I then did the same thing with some Ceramcoat purple, and made a purple ink that is of a cooler shade than the Reaper purple ink (cooler in that it doesn't have the reddish cast to it, not in the metaphysical sense of coolness). I've used both on a few figures so far, and they rock, especially when combined, which allows you to make it look like someone is wearing 2 different types of cloth (say, tabard and cloak), and that each has had differing amounts of wear on them. It takes some practice, but, as I tell my students, there is always room for improvement, because no one is perfect, and there will always be someone better whom you can learn from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...