Jump to content

The joys of a pin drill


Enchantra
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Reaper User

Just be careful with those paperclips and which clippers you use to snip 'em...I had a kid *shatter* a pair of GW clippers because he didn't realize the difference in hardness between friendly little aluminum paperclips and the deceptively cute-yet-deadly spring steel variety (which is what shattered the clipper).  No eyes were put out, thank the heavens...But that's why I use the brass rod, any clippers will cut it.  :)

 

--Anne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 29
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Jewellry 'pins'. They have a flat head on one end, and a dull tip. They are used for something in jewellry, you can buy them in big bags at Michaels, and they are quite long. Drill hole, snip to length, glue in. They are made out of mild steel.

 

Biggest thing I ever pinned with was a length of coat hanger, used it on Razorfang to pin his feet to the base. The hard stiff wire was perfect for holding him in. The base is hollowed out underneath, so I cut the wire longer than needed, and bent it into a "L". Part of the L went into his foot up through the base, the other part was glues to the underside of the base with epoxy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jewellry 'pins'. They have a flat head on one end, and a dull tip. They are used for something in jewellry, you can buy them in big bags at Michaels, and they are quite long. Drill hole, snip to length, glue in. They are made out of mild steel.

They also come with "hoops" on the end. They're used for making earrings or long strips of beads. I'll scan in a pic later tonight when I get home so people will know what you're talking about.

 

These are a very stiff wire and are pretty cheap. Normally a bag of about 10-15 will run under a dollar, and for pinning, they'll last you a good while. Note that being a stiffer wire, there could be some "flattening" of the end when cut.

 

Also, make certain you get the cheaper, more steel type, brands. They also make these in gold and silver, which will be more expensive and a softer metal.

 

Yes, I make my own jewelry.  :p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a little late coming into this discussion, but what the heck...

 

I, too, have learned the hard way about the perils of the pin vice snapping and embedding in one's finger. Fortunately for me, I discovered (after extracting it from my finger) that the bit had snapped in such a way as to create a very sharp point at the end, which is super useful for starting drill holes with now.   :D   The proverbial silver lining, if you will....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pin vises are ok, but if you are going to be knocking together a bunch of models, nothing beats a dremmel with high speed drill bits. I get mine from Micromark (they have the coolest tools for hobby work...):

 

http://www.micromark.com/

 

I use #68s (0.031") most of the time. I usually get at least 100 uses froma bit before it breaks or gets dull. I have pinned together entire armies in a night and have been able to pin stuff as thin as GW Dark Elf Executioner Blades (who the h#*& thought of making those in a separate casting anyway?). I also buy wire from Home depot in 100' ft. lengths (coiled)for about $4, much cheaper than brass rods. I save the brass for big display pieces (e.g. Dragons) that need the heavy gauge stuff.

 

Key points to remember when using a dremmel to drill metal.

 

1) Wear Gloves! The figure will get real hot in a hurry. I use thick rawhide ones.

2) Wear eye protection! :cool:  Seriously, if the bit does shear, pieces can go off at velocity generated by 30000 RPM machinery. No joke there.

3) Drill everything before starting to glue. The heat generated by drilling will wreak havoc on glue . Epoxy is quickly made useless and super glue isn't too far ahead in the heat resistance arena.

4) Test fit everything with wires in drilled holes before assembling with glue. Nothing like putting together a giant only to find he must have a slipped disc that resulted in a curiously shifted waistline.

5) Never, ever drill towards a body part. If the bit bites into the metal (something that you learn to avoid with practice) it will blow through a model in a heartbeat and keep going right through any flesh that may be on the other side. I pinch the part to be drilled between finger and thumb and drill perpindicular to the grip.

6) This is the key technique point. Drill in "pulses",meaning briefly apply pressure with the drill, then let off and pull back out a bit to allow the bit to clear metal fragments, then gently apply pressure again and so on. Never try to do a sustained drilling session, the model will get obscenely hot and your chance of the bit seizing goes up exponentially (resulting in a drill through or broken bit).

7) Choke up on the drill bit as far as possible to minimize off balance distortions in the bit. Dremmels go to the aforementioned 30000 RPM and extra length provides extra leverage for minor imbalances to become a serious pain.

8) Practice all of the above on crappy old figs that you don't care about to get a feel for the process before starting on the cool stuff...like your new Warlord figs

 

You will be amazed at how fast you can put together a fully pinned model that is far more durable than a non pinned variety with a dremmel tool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This might be a seperate thread topic but since it's about pinning I'll put it here.

 

Do you good people clip your pins THEN put them in the hole or glue the pin then cut? I can't seem to get the right length by the 2nd method.  I ususally end up with a nub that is way to short.

I put the pin in place but don't glue it. Then, holding it in place with my finger, I line it up next to the second piece it'll be inserted into, gauge the depth of the drilled hole and then clip. If it needs a little more clipping or some filing, I can do it without damaging any of the mini's pieces or fracturing any dried glue and compromising the hold.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well to avoid rust always keep the stuff in a sealed container away from sources of moisture.

 

AS for a dremel.  When I actually feel the need to have one I will get one.  Dremels are fun things to have but for the small amount of pinning I actually do, I don't see the worth in spending the money right now on a Dremel.

 

I will ask for it for Hanukkah instead   :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dremels are also useful for removing flash and mold lines in hard to reach places, especially where files and knife blades fear to go.

 

The right small engraving and grinding bits (with a very, very light touch and practice) can do wonders, especially on detailed surfaces where the surface has lots of rises and drops.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta agree with Oracle... and for those of you who are not yet afflicted with such joys as "carpel tunnel"... a dremmel (or a verisimilatude) will save hours of numbness... I used to think I couldn't do the detail work/pinning with a dremmel until I recently pinned a particularly dainty Dennis Mize model back together (after a delicate piece popped off).

 

Anyway... dremmel good... ugh ugh (think caveman... dunno why I'm in caveman mode...)

 

MG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For drilling at speed, when it is safe and advisable (often not possible), I use a cordless drill.  It has a variable speed trigger, I can drill vveeerrrry ssslloowwwwlly.  Great for control of depth, keeping things in line, etc.  I have a Dremel and use it for polishings, flash removal, etc, but that 3000+ RPM seems a bit fast to drill small delicate stuff.

 

For hand drilling, I have a Xano tool holder, 2 collets, it'll hold needle like drill bits or files, etc. if I want.  Knoblike wooden handle makes it easy to hold and control.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...