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Competition piece question


psyberwolfe1
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So I have spent the last few weeks since I have graduated on a possible competition piece. As I have worked on him I have just noticed a small casting fault in a place no blade or file on earth can get at because of the impossiblely tight space and angle involved. It is apparent at a sight distance of less than 6" and only if you know what you are looking for. My question is should I risk the fault being caught, or chalk this figure up to display/ practice piece for comp? It is a Reaper Figure, which is a single cast.

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Depends on the time left to replace it in the competition and how you'd feel about not placing based on the problem. Me, I tend not to compete, so take my advice with a grain of salt... but if I was intent on competing I'd enter it just to get the extra critique on everything else... Also, while you might not be able to file it, can you use filler to conceal it?

 

I've seen masterpieces that have nooks and crannies filled and/or concealed and it doesn't detract from my appreciation of 'em on bit... on the other hand, if I notice something that was ignored that needs resolution it *may* affect the rating if there is a tie with one with fewer "flaws"...

 

It's late (for me) so I apologize if I've gone of topic or am babbling...

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In a tight spot ... if a file can't get in, can you get some green stuff in there and shape it? With a toothpick (or with more expensive tools).

 

Personally never done much with sculpting green stuff myself, but that's what I'd be tempted to do.

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Hey, I've won a Sophie trophy for a mini that had terrible mold lines on it. :-p

 

Oh you be quiet!! You & your 4 or 5 Sophies!! I was robbed this year!! :lol: :lol:

 

Psy, where is the mold line at? I'm not a master nor not even a novice using gs but, I'd try to cover it the best I could & try & smooth it out, using the moist toothpick method.

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The answer is it depends on the competition. If two pieces are painted identically, by two people of the exact same skill level the piece with the mold line is going to lose. If you are down to looking at the flaws which is exactly what happens when you are down to the top four or five miniatures the piece with the fewest flaws is going to win and a mold line is pretty major flaw, especially if you can see it at 6" away.

 

Sitting in on judging can be a very discouraging experience in general. I run the competition at Tacticon and Genghis Con, although I don't judge I'm in the room moving pieces back and forth from the display case to the judging table and recording the results. I learn a lot but I cringe at times as well.

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You might try multiple layers of brush-on matte sealer. It takes a little bit of work, but the result is that the mold line is layered over smoothly and will accept paint afterwards. Just make sure the previous layer is dry before adding the next layer.

 

And yes, if you can see it the judges will see it.

 

Good luck!

 

-Doug

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disguise it, alter it, remove it, fudge it...but yes, if you know a problem exists and are asking if you should do something about it for a competition piece...what you are really asking is for us to justify you not doing it. You want permission to be less than your best. You want to slack a bit, you don't want to do more work than you have to...but face it, that's what competition pieces are all about--the work.

 

If you have to ask the question, you have to do it. ;-)

 

And this is a frequent problem around the immps table...

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Sitting in on judging can be a very discouraging experience in general. I run the competition at Tacticon and Genghis Con, although I don't judge I'm in the room moving pieces back and forth from the display case to the judging table and recording the results. I learn a lot but I cringe at times as well.

 

You could cringe even more if you'd only let us have beer before we were done!! :lol: Oh, wait, I guess that's not too convincing...

 

But on-topic and seriously, the others are exactly right. If you are doing this to push yourself and get some good feedback on your painting, then you could choose to let the mold line go. But if you are serious about doing your absolute best and shooting for the top, I would try to see if you could fix it with some filler or putty work, because a flaw is a flaw and almost any judge that sees it is going to grade you down for it. There's almost nothing more heartbreaking than the "You would have taken first, but we noticed this mold line..." speech.

 

--Anne ::):

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And this is a frequent problem around the immps table...

 

Sue, what's an immps table?

 

Good advice, by the way, if a little in-your-face. ::):

 

immps...IMMPS = Illinois/Midwest Mini Painters Society. This is our painting group that meets almost every Friday night.

 

And the reason I might have been a bit "in-your-face" is that it is a personal issue I struggle with as well...just ask eastman and skya! How many times do I ask this kind of question about my own stuff every competition piece? Really, they just roll their eyes at me now and say "quit procrastinating and do it". And I'm a judge!

 

It points more towards insecurities and just how difficult competition work can be on your brain than it does to your abilities. I mean, the question isn't really about whether you should do it, but "can I get away with not doing it?" and the answer is, if it's a competition piece, "No, you cannot get away with not doing it."

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Thanks for the replies.

 

Perhaps I was looking for permission to slack off. Honestly the decision to not deal with the flaw was made before I posted. Really I was asking if one should or should not risk a flaw on a competition piece. The overwhelming response was no, which I honestly knew. I was going to disguise the flaw as a keloid/ hypertrophic scar tissue, but I am not totally sold on that idea. When I am not sold on an idea it becomes evident.

 

I think making it a display piece is the best course of action. This model was cleaned and polished and initially it looked fixed. It has jumped out as not fixed during painting. I really do not want to revisit the 2 near injuries I had when I was initially cleaning the figure. The real lesson learned here is I need to carefully choose my competition pieces, and if I can’t fix the flaws then I should look at another piece.

 

Good News! This means I can WIP this piece here and get painting advice.

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There's almost nothing more heartbreaking than the "You would have taken first, but we noticed this mold line..." speech.

 

Considering I hadn't even intended to enter that piece, and I started it a day or so before the contest, I was fine taking the silver.

 

What made it even better was the fact that for a brief period, it was in the Reaper Gallery credited to Anne. Then I could give *you* grief about the mold lines. :-)

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