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Using the Liners


DavidVC04
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So how much water, if any, do you add to the RMS liners?

 

How do you decide when to use black, blue, grey, etc.?

 

How extensively do you line? Just about everywhere you can?

 

I've been an unabashed black primer and just painted up the fold, crease, whatever, and left it at that. I've never really done much lining, other than painting black into places where my brush slipped.

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So how much water, if any, do you add to the RMS liners?

 

How do you decide when to use black, blue, grey, etc.?

 

How extensively do you line? Just about everywhere you can?

 

I've been an unabashed black primer and just painted up the fold, crease, whatever, and left it at that. I've never really done much lining, other than painting black into places where my brush slipped.

 

 

Good question on a frequently overlooked paint. The liners are amazing tools that can really save the day if you know how to use them. I generally dillute my liners down quite a bit, but then again, I don't really use the "lining" technique. I have found that the liners do a great job of staining areas when you need a total color shift, or deepening and smoothing a shade. Of course, they also come in handy when a little spot of paint is missing in an armpit, or behind a head. I have 3 liners; blue, gray, and brown. Generally speaking, lining with black will wreck your paint job, and looks way too unrealistic. Blue is great for cracks and crevaces because blue naturally shades. The gray is nice for deepening a gray tone, or applied thinned over a bone basecoat to weather bone. The brown is good for shading blue to the darkest shades. Also, Anne turned me on to Nightshade Purple, which is a fantastic "liner", and I recently discovered Walnut Brown is another excellent choice for adding a lot of life to dark shaded areas.

 

Really though, if you thin your paints enough, it's a good idea to let the excess flow into the recesses. Shaded areas in real life are created when the colors around that area are absorbed. For instance, look at the wadded up shirt on your floor...notice the folds are absorbing the colors around it, and the darker, shaded parts are actually the colors of the floor, the shirt, the nightstand, etc. all combined into a darker color. Your brain tells you it's "darker", but look at the actual colors that create the shade. If I have a medium-blue shirt on a blonde bamboo floor next to a walnut nightstand (and I do...gotta pick that up) I see the shades under the folds of the shirt are a combination of blue, dark brown, and ochre. If I mix these colors together on a painting tile, I get a more realistic shade color, instead of using black.

 

It sounds goofy, but take a picture of that shirt on the floor...or that towel on the rack...or a crumpled piece of paper. Save it to your computer, and open it in MS "paint"...blow the pic size up, and select a color. You'll be AMAZED the different colors that a simple thing has...and it's all because your eyes tell your brain "that's a piece of white paper", instead of analyzing what colors are actually present. It's the same way you can tell what color a car is at any time during the day.

 

Sorry for the novel...hope that helps a little.

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Gulp! I've got to quit asking questions. :blink:

 

No, that's great. Thanks a million, lunchbox.

 

I'll be using a lot of greens and browns on the model, and probably some bone colors along the way. So do I stick with green and brown liners? Or would blue, purple, or something else pull off some magic? Do I need to consider what the surrounding areas will be?

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Ouch. Lunchbox's use of bold text on all his posts hurts my eyes so I'll just put out my thoughts and let you contrast/compare to his.

 

I use the liners to compliment my paint scheme. If I'm doing something with a lot of grey in it I'll mix the grey liner in with another color. Typically I mix grey and brown. But I've mixed grey and blue, as well as blue and green for some other models.

 

Liner is like any other color on a model. If you're doing a model in purple and grey, you can mix the two liners together to get an harmonious lining color. If you're doing a lot of green on a model you can use red to give some contrast.

 

How much I thin depends on the liner. Some require less thinning than others, some colors cover better. As with any of the paints you need to give it a try and see what works for you. If you're going for a softer lining effect you can thin them a little more. Thin them less for a more distinct line. Personal preference and artistic effect.

 

I love my liners. I don't think there's a color in the batch I haven't used at some point. Right now I'm using red liner on a set of models to draw the lining into the color scheme. If I had wanted to contrast it greatly I would have mixed blue and green (since my main color is orange-red).

 

Also, I generally use one color of liner on a model. I don't switch based on the area being lined. So I consider the model as a whole when deciding on a lining color.

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I really like the liners too, both for shading and for lining. They are very smooth paints, and the more you use them, the more uses you will find for them, I think.

 

So how much water, if any, do you add to the RMS liners?

I have a mix of 50% Flow-Aid and water. To a drop of liner I'll add one drop of my mix and one drop of pure water. These proportions are just a start though. You need to experiment with your own mixes to find what works better for you. For lining, though, you generally don't want it to be too diluted, as you don't want to have to go back over it. That is, you want it to cover in one go.

 

Check out the Flow-Aid. It breaks the surface tension in your puddle of paint, so that the pigment will flow smoothly off your brush and into the crevices. There is already some flow aid mixed into the MSPs, but I find adding a little more really makes lining much easier.

 

How do you decide when to use black, blue, grey, etc.?

This is really up to you as an artist. Some high-end painters (Derek Schubert, for example) have said that they almost never use black anymore. Others use black all the time. If you are going for a realistic look, you want the lining to be a very dark shadow between two adjacent items. Just think about how you want your mini to look. Black will be a stark line, and one of the other liners might be a softer line between the two items. I disagree with Lunchbox that "using black with wreck your paintjob." It might be less realistic, and more cartoony, but if that is the look you are going for, then go for it.

 

How extensively do you line? Just about everywhere you can?

Personally I like the way that lining looks, but not everyone does. Marike Reimer is famous for using very dark lining. Check out some of her work if you haven't already, it's pretty amazing.

 

I think Jeremie Bonamont Teboul is a good example of a painter who doesn't line so much. His website is here.

 

I think the important thing to remember is that there is not one right way to do this hobby. Experiment around and paint the mini so that it looks good to you!

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Marike uses dark brown for her lining, last I checked; not sure which paint line. Jeremie doesn't line (he told us so during his seminar!), instead choosing to let the placement of his shadows and highlights define the parts of his models. I use Brown Liner or Walnut for almost all of my lining; I find that a dark dark brown is very close to a warm black so I have no problem using it for things like greys and blues. ::): The less you thin the liner, the harsher the dark line will be. I like a strong dark line on fantasy minis so I use five drops of liner to only one drop of water. If I'm doing historical miniatures I want a more naturalistic look so I thin my liner a little more for a more subtle line. ::): I agree with Rastl that using a single color of liner throughout a model helps tie the different parts of the mini together. ::):

 

--Anne

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I use black for lining, and I use it anyplace different materials meet, or where there's an overlap. So I'd line between a belt and the cloth around it, but also where the belt might overlap itself.

 

It is a more unrealistic look, but when I experimented with it I grew to love it. I prime in white, then blackline so the mini looks like an inked drawing. Very stark. Then I block in my darkest shade as the base, leaving some blackline visible and highlight out.

 

It's not the most popular style, but I absolutely love the effect however fake it appears. Realism isn't my goal.

 

I figure since I'm the one who has to live with 'em, whats pleasing to my eyes trumps all. :-p

 

edit: I'm actually thinking of completely crossing over to the dark side and painting minis with harsher shading to mimic a cel animation look. I might be crazy, but I don't see many minis done like that and it might be a unique fun thing to try. Might turn out horrible, too, but I think it'd be an interesting experiment.

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What's the difference between liner paint and regular paint in the MSP line? I have brown liner that I use to line, but I haven't really thought about buying any other colour because I figured I would do it with the regular colours I have already.

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The liners are have a thinner consistency than regular paint, making them flow a lot better. Also there's not paint colors in the MSP line that match the liners, so they're basically the darkest shade available in the line for each of the colors, red, gray, blue, brown, violet, and green.

 

Anne can probably explain the exact differences a lot better than I can.

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Well, here's the lining work I did, along with getting restless to paint the model and having a go at the leather. I used brown liner, dilluted just a bit.

 

I wonder, do any of you have pics of models at the lining stage? Well-done or poorly-done, both are instructive. I don't have anything to compare mine, too.

 

I'd love to see any examples you folks might have.

 

I included the paints I used for the leather. It seems an inordinate number of paints for such small areas. Mixing these, I used a total of 7 or 8 colors. I had to go back and glaze with the harvest brown due to some poor blending on the leather gauntlet and one of the boot flaps.

 

IMG_0444.jpg

IMG_0445.jpg

IMG_0449.jpg

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