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morganm

DaVinci Maestro Kolinsky Brushes

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I've about had it with crappy brushes that don't hold a point past the first brush stroke. I'd like to put some good brushes on my Christmas list :)

 

Are the Reaper sable brushes good? Better than Game Workshop 'Citadel' brushes? (the only things I've used are a couple of GW Citadel brushes and cheap synthetics from Michaels)

 

I've heard good words about the Raphael brushes and like the 3 set here: http://www.dickblick.com/zz065/71/

 

 

Then I browsed over to look at some Da Vinci Maestro kolinsky brushes. http://www.dickblick.com/zz058/52a/ I want to try a "good" brush but not sure if I could truly utilize or appricate the difference yet between a 'good' brush and a really expensive 'great' brush. Are they worth the extra cost than a Reaper sable brush for a novice like me?

 

Thanks!

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I've about had it with crappy brushes that don't hold a point past the first brush stroke. I'd like to put some good brushes on my Christmas list :)

 

Are the Reaper sable brushes good? Better than Game Workshop 'Citadel' brushes? (the only things I've used are a couple of GW Citadel brushes and cheap synthetics from Michaels)

 

Much as I love Reaper minis and paints I can't speak for the brushes as I've never used them. However, their sable brushes will likely kick butt over any GW or synthetic brush. Synthetics especially...

 

I've heard good words about the Raphael brushes and like the 3 set here: http://www.dickblick.com/zz065/71/

 

Raphaels have a good reputation, but I don't think you'll be using the rigger much. The #2 is a good brush for basecoating and blending large areas. The #0 will be good for smaller area blending and detail work. The rigger is way too long for most painting work, even outlining. The bristles tend to bend as you outline, which is fine for canvas, where you're pulling the whole brush along, keeping it at a slight angle to the surface. But for minis, it will be hard to control around complex curves, as it will tend to want to bounce back. The #0 will do the same outlining job better.

 

Now it's your call: individually the #0 and #2 retail for only about $4 less than the set.

 

Then I browsed over to look at some Da Vinci Maestro kolinsky brushes. http://www.dickblick.com/zz058/52a/ I want to try a "good" brush but not sure if I could truly utilize or appricate the difference yet between a 'good' brush and a really expensive 'great' brush. Are they worth the extra cost than a Reaper sable brush for a novice like me?

 

Thanks!

 

I prefer the Maestros so I'm a bit biased... :poke: However, I can say they are excellent brushes. I've used some for going on 4 years now, with no curling of the tip or deformation of the bristles. They're a good, balanced painting brushes. Not too stiff, which tends to be the downfall of nylon brushes, and not too soft, like cheap-o GW sables.

 

Frankly you will see a difference, regardless of skill level. Kolinsky sables lay paint down much more smoothly. They hold a good reservoir of paint in the "belly" or middle of the brush, so strokes last longer. They're not that much more expensive, esp. if you consider how many "cheap" $5 Michaels brushes you blow through after a few minis, and they last forever with proper care. Overall I recommend anyone switch up to them.

 

The key with kolinsky brushes, as with any brushes, is scrupulous cleaning. I rinse frequently during painting, then wash with brush soap after each session and condition with a light conditioner (one for hair is fine, or something like "Pink Soap" brush cleaner.)

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Also make sure, if you super-glue your mini's to bottle caps or any other kind of surface to hold on to them, to give that small puddle of glue more than ample time to dry... i destroyed one of my series 7's this way by thinking the glue was dry 5 minutes later... three weeks later the brush was a victim to this same fate after waiting 10 minutes for the puddle to dry sealing its fate to be a wash brush *cry*

 

Fortunately it was one of my "bad" series 7's that came from blick with an errant hair so it wasn't a devastating loss.

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I guess the next question is what sizes should I get? That's a long list of different Maestros there on Dick Blick's site! Maybe even a quick definition of what different sizing terms mean? Why is it some are called "#10/0"? Difference between a Round, Restauro Retouch, Liner, One Stroke, etc. And which types are best for miniatures? As noted there are ones good for canvas but do not translate well to use on a mini.

 

Thanks!

 

 

Is this one good? =)

05819-OB3ww-l.jpg

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The more zeroes a brush has.. the smaller the tip... 10/0 = 0000000000 ... brush sizes vary from brush to brush... a #1 series 7 will be different from a #1 da vinci maestro .. but generally speaking i think the safe range of sizes is a #1 or #2 down to maybe 4/0 or 5/0? I personally use nothing smaller than a 0 i believe... the sizes have been rubbed off the handles of my most used brushes so I don't clearly recall the sizes anymore.

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The more zeroes a brush has.. the smaller the tip... 10/0 = 0000000000 ... brush sizes vary from brush to brush... a #1 series 7 will be different from a #1 da vinci maestro .. but generally speaking i think the safe range of sizes is a #1 or #2 down to maybe 4/0 or 5/0? I personally use nothing smaller than a 0 i believe... the sizes have been rubbed off the handles of my most used brushes so I don't clearly recall the sizes anymore.

 

I've got a system for that... I score the end of brush with a number or rings that matches it's size then I paint the grooves with white paint and wipe the excess off. Since a 000 and a #3 are significantly different I do not bother with a different system (3 grooves fr #000 or #3).

 

Rgds,

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I've used Reaper brushes and I recommend them. A Reaper Kolinsky sable #1 is virtually an all-purpose brush: big enough to lay down good base coats, but with a point fine enough to dot eyes. My technique is very hard on brushes -- a lot of paint and water gets up into the ferrule -- but the Reaper brushes stand up to even my abuse. ::P:

 

I used to think that more 0's were always better (#10/0, #20/0, #30/0), in my quest to have a brush small enough to paint eyes and other fine details, but now I realize that a good point is what's important. Tiny brushes are sometimes actually worse, as they don't hold much paint or don't keep it fluid for long; on many of my figures from ten to fifteen years ago, I was able to apply the paint to the proper part of the eye or freehand design, but the thickness of the paint made distinctive bulges. (Sometimes I would mash the painted eye down with the butt of the brush, because the paint stuck out too much!) I don't think I've used brushes smaller than size #0 in a couple of years -- and this certainly hasn't stopped me from painting fine details. :;):

 

Derek

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Also make sure, if you super-glue your mini's to bottle caps or any other kind of surface to hold on to them, to give that small puddle of glue more than ample time to dry... i destroyed one of my series 7's this way by thinking the glue was dry 5 minutes later... three weeks later the brush was a victim to this same fate after waiting 10 minutes for the puddle to dry sealing its fate to be a wash brush *cry*

 

Fortunately it was one of my "bad" series 7's that came from blick with an errant hair so it wasn't a devastating loss.

 

acetone, followed by a really good rinse and then an overnight conditioning (I prefer Pink Soap) can fix that.

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Smallest I use is a 3/0 liner (slightly longer bristles) for thin lines. Gets a lot of use for darklining as well. 0 and 1 are the two workhorse brushes while a 2 is used for large swathes of color.

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I guess the next question is what sizes should I get? That's a long list of different Maestros there on Dick Blick's site! Maybe even a quick definition of what different sizing terms mean? Why is it some are called "#10/0"? Difference between a Round, Restauro Retouch, Liner, One Stroke, etc. And which types are best for miniatures? As noted there are ones good for canvas but do not translate well to use on a mini.

 

Here's a good general guide about brush styles: http://www.draw-art.co.nz/products/brushes...tbrushchart.pdf

 

Quickie descriptions:

 

Round = the standard brush style, with a slightly-tapered "belly" to hold paint.

Retouch = same width, but half the length of a similar round, meant for detailed work. Also called spotter or "miniature" (W&N Series 7). The shorter bristles give more control.

Liner = same width as a retouch/spotter, but twice the length, for painting long, straight lines (think car pin-striping).

One Stroke = craft-style brush for "one stroke" painting style.

 

For minis the round and retouch/miniature/spotter are usually the best styles. Rounds for general work and spotters for details. Liners are also good, but depend on your particular working style. I got used to using them so I now prefer them for most things.

 

Fact is, like Derek says you can get away with most any style as long as it has a sharp tip and holds enough paint. For that reason I usually stick in the 1 to 0 range for general blending, and 2/0 or 3/0 for detail work.

 

Take care,

Laszlo

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I use Windsor Newton Series 7 brushes. My wife bought them for me for Christmas 4 years ago and they are still in good shape (except the 1/0 which will need replacing soon). I use a 1, 0, 1/0, and 2/0. The 0 and 1/0 are my workhorses used for almost everything. I use the 2/0 primarily for fine freehand work. The 1 I use for base coating bigger minis.

 

I love these brushes and will never go back to cheap sable or synthetics again.

 

TS

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To answer your question about sizes and the DaVinci Maestros, those are the brush I prefer, and I use the size 1 and the size 0. The DaVinci size 1 is slimmer than your typical size 1 from other brush lines, and I find it ideal for lining and my style of layering. If I need a shorter bristle for some reason that's when I pick up the size 0. Also, for your sizing information, the DaVinci Maestro 0 is roughly the same size as a W&N Series 7 size 00 and the Reaper Kolinsky size 0/5, which is an all-around awesome all-purpose size for painting miniatures no matter which brand you choose. ::):

 

--Anne

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To answer your question about sizes and the DaVinci Maestros, those are the brush I prefer, and I use the size 1 and the size 0. The DaVinci size 1 is slimmer than your typical size 1 from other brush lines, and I find it ideal for lining and my style of layering. If I need a shorter bristle for some reason that's when I pick up the size 0. Also, for your sizing information, the DaVinci Maestro 0 is roughly the same size as a W&N Series 7 size 00 and the Reaper Kolinsky size 0/5, which is an all-around awesome all-purpose size for painting miniatures no matter which brand you choose. ::):

 

--Anne

 

The brushes Anne refers to are the DaVinci Maestro Series 10. These are slimmer in profile as stated. DaVinci Maestro Seies 11 are traditional rounds with fuller bellies and mimic the WN7s in size and shape. The 5506 Restauro is a brush with a nice thin profile and slightly shorter hair. They are in between the Series 10 and DaVinci's retouch lines 1505/1506. I use some from the Series 10, Series 11 and Restauro lines and like them alot.

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Revisiting this thread because I've totally trashed all of my crappy brushes in my last few painting sessions; even the Reaper Kolinsky Sables I got last Christmas are hosed. I refuse to do any real painting until I get some good brushes. I'm sooooo sick of fighting hooked / curled tips, stray hairs, and only getting one stroke before the tip is lost.

 

Looking at http://www.dickblick.com/products/da-vinci...es/#description

Da Vinci Maestro Kolinsky Brushes for watercolors

 

How about these:

06754-1000 5506 Restauro Retouch, Size 0

06754-1001 5506 Restauro Retouch, Size 1

 

I'd really like to get a Liner but what size... 1, 0, or 5/0 ? To me it seems like a liner would help with doing eyes, mouths, teeth, claws, and other hard to reach details... no?

 

What do you think of the Sharp Round vs Round vs Retouch?

 

I know ppl have mentioned DaVinci Maestros, sizes, and types but haven't really put the variables together... if you look at that site there's dozens to choose from and I'm just overwhelmed trying to pick a few good brushes. What specific DaVinici Maestro type and size do you use? EX: Retouch 0, Liner 5/0, Sharp Round 1.

 

Pls be specific, thx!

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