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I have a can of Krylon Clear Glaze, and a can of Krylon Matte Finish which have been sitting around for almost a year. How do I use them?


celestialkin
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Hi,

 

It's been a while since I posted here, but I gave in recently and decide to paint some minis which I had been converting (I had given up after not being able to get anywhere with primers or paints).

 

I have a can of Krylon Clear Glaze, and a can of Krylon Matte Finish. I am not sure how to use them. I am not even sure what order to use them in, or if it even matters.

 

 

Here are the pots I finished a few days ago, but have not been able to use since I am not sure how to protect them (I plan to use them very often in my game's dungeons and taverns).

 

 

1-1.png

 

2-1.png

 

3-1.png

 

4-1.png

 

5.png

 

6.png

 

 

Can those experienced with these products, or any Matte/Glaze products please help me?

 

I was suggested to buy these on this forum, but no one really explained how or why to use them. I am not even sure what the difference is between the two, or if there even is one.

 

I REALLY do not want to damage these things. they cost me some cash, and a lot of time converting them, and even more time painting them.

 

 

Thank you in advance for any help!

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Right: the gloss is very protective but makes things look like plastic, so you follow it with matte to dull the shine. Thereafter any shiny spots indicate wear, so you recoat.

 

Leave it a long time to dry before clear coating. Acrylics and the oil or enamel paints in the can can mess with each other badly if still wet. Give it a couple of days. Do not spray on a hot or humid day. Shake the can very well before using. Give it a test spray and if it sprays blobs or raindrops instead of a fine even mist, don't use it. Use a side-to-side motion starting before the model and ending after the model. Don't apply thick coats! DON'T APPLY THICK COATS! Give the gloss plenty of time to dry (24 hours or more; read the can) before applying the matte.

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Right: the gloss is very protective but makes things look like plastic, so you follow it with matte to dull the shine. Thereafter any shiny spots indicate wear, so you recoat.

 

Leave it a long time to dry before clear coating. Acrylics and the oil or enamel paints in the can can mess with each other badly if still wet. Give it a couple of days. Do not spray on a hot or humid day. Shake the can very well before using. Give it a test spray and if it sprays blobs or raindrops instead of a fine even mist, don't use it. Use a side-to-side motion starting before the model and ending after the model. Don't apply thick coats! DON'T APPLY THICK COATS! Give the gloss plenty of time to dry (24 hours or more; read the can) before applying the matte.

 

 

I see. Thanks for the detailed information.

 

But how many coats of each do I use?

 

Also, since they are meant to be ceramic pots, wouldn't a shiny coat be a good thing?

 

 

Oh, and I finished painting them on Wednesday. Would that be enough time?

 

And around what humidity would it be OK to spray these two products? I would prefer some actual numbers, if they are out there.

 

 

edit:

Oh, and how do I know the difference between what is considered a thick layer, and what makes a thin layer? I am completely new to this, so sorry.

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If I am spraying, I wait until the humidity is <65%. And, I wait 24 hours (at least) from the last painting session to the varnishing session. I've also had better results waiting 24 hours from the gloss coat to the first matte coat.

 

Shake the cans for at least 2 minutes before use.

 

When spraying, I generally do 3 pairs of passes on each side. One straight on, one from about 30-45 deg down and one from 30-45 deg up. Fairly fast pass back and forth for each angle. Start spraying from before the mini until you completely pass the mini.

 

If you want a glossy look, then just the gloss coat would be fine.

 

I generally will use 1 gloss coat (full set of passes on each side) and 2-3 matte coats.

 

Ron

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I have a friendly request for celestialkin. Don't forget to compress your images (JPEG format is best) before you post them. Some of us are not blessed with high speed connections, but would like to see your pictures without waiting an hour to d/l them. Any photo editing software you can name should have this ability. Thanks.

 

Here are the pots I finished a few days ago, but have not been able to use since I am not sure how to protect them (I plan to use them very often in my game's dungeons and taverns).

 

Thank you in advance for any help!

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ATM is absolutely correct. Test them on something to could care less about. Esp since your cans have been sitting around for a year. I have had bad luck with Krylon, even the matte finish could come out too shiney/glossy if you are not careful and practice with it first.. Light coats is the key, you can always add another coat, but you cant take one away...

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ATM is absolutely correct. Test them on something to could care less about. Esp since your cans have been sitting around for a year. I have had bad luck with Krylon, even the matte finish could come out too shiney/glossy if you are not careful and practice with it first.. Light coats is the key, you can always add another coat, but you cant take one away...

 

 

Dammit. I freaking ruined them.

 

I tested it on the one which I felt I painted the worse (though I feel none really were painted well at all), and I tried to do everything mentioned in this thread, the humidity here was even at 55%! I waited an hour to let it dry and see how it turned out. I thought it was OK, so I did the batch, but now after about 9 hours they feel gritty like sandpaper, and in the light (even in dim light) they look like they are covered in tiny craters or bumps.

 

So much time and effort thrown down the toilet. Hence why I did not want to risk painting them to begin with.

 

 

Oh well, thank you all for trying to help me. Much appreciated!

 

I'll see if I can find some Zelda merchandise on ebay which have small pots.

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I paint in a semi-humid basement and I find the best approach to the humidity problem is to buy a cheap 30$ walmart dehumidifier and put 5 feet or so from where you want to spray.I use 2 of them year round in the basement to avoid all humidity problems.(I collect comics and cards)

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