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I don't know of any tutorials, but here's a quick description of how I sculpt hair:

 

0) Start with a bald head with ears on it.

1) Mix some new green stuff.

2) Take a little hunk of green stuff, roll it out quickly on a piece of paper or between my fingers, and apply it to the back of the head as one of many big chunky locks -- usually the most tapered end of this lock is the free end, away from the head. Repeat with more locks from back to front, sides to middle, until almost all the mass of the hair is on the head. I sometimes leave the hair at the center of the forehead off until the end, so I can add a couple of thin locks as a final step.

3) Adjust the hairline (at the forehead/temples) and the free ends of the hair.

4) During minutes 15-60 or so, shape the mass of hair into more distinct locks (using a bullet-pointed clay shaper or other wedge-shaped tool), but don't cut strands in yet. Add any stray locks with very thin-rolled pieces of green stuff.

5) Cut in the finer detail (strands) when the putty is almost cured, so it will hold the impression of the knife but not chop apart or deform much. Sometimes I don't add the detail, but just let the hair consist of smoother masses whose detail will be defined by paint.

 

Attached is a multiple-view image of the head of a figure that I sculpted last summer ('08). The stringy ends of the hair were already generally shaped like that when I first applied the putty to the head. This is an example of smooth hair.

 

Hope this helps,

Derek

 

post-2358-1232162449_thumb.jpg

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Thanks, but I already did my version of Pedro Kantor. In fact, I just need to make sure I didn't miss anything and hit him with some Dullcote tomorrow. Although this will be useful to the next persome wanting to do something similar.

 

A-OK. Sorry about the late reply, since I wasn't looking at the forum for a few weeks.

If you took pics of the conversion without paint, post them when you show off the final version, OK?

 

Derek

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  • 12 years later...
On 1/17/2009 at 1:26 AM, dks said:

I don't know of any tutorials, but here's a quick description of how I sculpt hair:

 

0) Start with a bald head with ears on it.

1) Mix some new green stuff.

2) Take a little hunk of green stuff, roll it out quickly on a piece of paper or between my fingers, and apply it to the back of the head as one of many big chunky locks -- usually the most tapered end of this lock is the free end, away from the head. Repeat with more locks from back to front, sides to middle, until almost all the mass of the hair is on the head. I sometimes leave the hair at the center of the forehead off until the end, so I can add a couple of thin locks as a final step.

3) Adjust the hairline (at the forehead/temples) and the free ends of the hair.

4) During minutes 15-60 or so, shape the mass of hair into more distinct locks (using a bullet-pointed clay shaper or other wedge-shaped tool), but don't cut strands in yet. Add any stray locks with very thin-rolled pieces of green stuff.

5) Cut in the finer detail (strands) when the putty is almost cured, so it will hold the impression of the knife but not chop apart or deform much. Sometimes I don't add the detail, but just let the hair consist of smoother masses whose detail will be defined by paint.

 

Attached is a multiple-view image of the head of a figure that I sculpted last summer ('08). The stringy ends of the hair were already generally shaped like that when I first applied the putty to the head. This is an example of smooth hair.

 

Hope this helps,

Derek

 

post-2358-1232162449_thumb.jpg

Hi. Could you please tell where are this mini from?

On 1/17/2009 at 1:26 AM, dks said:

I don't know of any tutorials, but here's a quick description of how I sculpt hair:

 

0) Start with a bald head with ears on it.

1) Mix some new green stuff.

2) Take a little hunk of green stuff, roll it out quickly on a piece of paper or between my fingers, and apply it to the back of the head as one of many big chunky locks -- usually the most tapered end of this lock is the free end, away from the head. Repeat with more locks from back to front, sides to middle, until almost all the mass of the hair is on the head. I sometimes leave the hair at the center of the forehead off until the end, so I can add a couple of thin locks as a final step.

3) Adjust the hairline (at the forehead/temples) and the free ends of the hair.

4) During minutes 15-60 or so, shape the mass of hair into more distinct locks (using a bullet-pointed clay shaper or other wedge-shaped tool), but don't cut strands in yet. Add any stray locks with very thin-rolled pieces of green stuff.

5) Cut in the finer detail (strands) when the putty is almost cured, so it will hold the impression of the knife but not chop apart or deform much. Sometimes I don't add the detail, but just let the hair consist of smoother masses whose detail will be defined by paint.

 

Attached is a multiple-view image of the head of a figure that I sculpted last summer ('08). The stringy ends of the hair were already generally shaped like that when I first applied the putty to the head. This is an example of smooth hair.

 

Hope this helps,

Derek

 

post-2358-1232162449_thumb.jpg

 

On 1/17/2009 at 1:26 AM, dks said:

I don't know of any tutorials, but here's a quick description of how I sculpt hair:

 

0) Start with a bald head with ears on it.

1) Mix some new green stuff.

2) Take a little hunk of green stuff, roll it out quickly on a piece of paper or between my fingers, and apply it to the back of the head as one of many big chunky locks -- usually the most tapered end of this lock is the free end, away from the head. Repeat with more locks from back to front, sides to middle, until almost all the mass of the hair is on the head. I sometimes leave the hair at the center of the forehead off until the end, so I can add a couple of thin locks as a final step.

3) Adjust the hairline (at the forehead/temples) and the free ends of the hair.

4) During minutes 15-60 or so, shape the mass of hair into more distinct locks (using a bullet-pointed clay shaper or other wedge-shaped tool), but don't cut strands in yet. Add any stray locks with very thin-rolled pieces of green stuff.

5) Cut in the finer detail (strands) when the putty is almost cured, so it will hold the impression of the knife but not chop apart or deform much. Sometimes I don't add the detail, but just let the hair consist of smoother masses whose detail will be defined by paint.

 

Attached is a multiple-view image of the head of a figure that I sculpted last summer ('08). The stringy ends of the hair were already generally shaped like that when I first applied the putty to the head. This is an example of smooth hair.

 

Hope this helps,

Derek

 

post-2358-1232162449_thumb.jpg

Hi. Could you please tell me where are this mini from?

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That was a one-off sculpt for a diorama -- my entry into the Privateer Press Grand Master Painting Competition in 2008.

I painted the original sculpt, so there are no copies available!

Derek

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