Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Samedi

Hermit with Ravens - Please support your local newb

Recommended Posts

Hello and welcome to my first WIP-Thread where I try to make my first little diorama.

 

Here's the situation: I'm a very slow painter with too little time to paint - so far I have finished seven minis in the last three years. Without even an attempt to base one of them. And my working hours don't permit me to join a local painting group. However, all of you have helped me a lot in the past and so I will use this thread to ask all my questions, stay focused and show my progress. I'm looking forward to a lot of C&C.

 

THE PROJECT

I'll build a little diorama about an hermit who lived in the wood near lake Zurich and had two raven friends. When he was murdered the two ravens chased the murderers all the way back to Zurich. The diorama will show the hermit in the wood, talking to his two ravens. That's all I know so far. Deadline is the end of August - I'm planning it as a birthday gift for my dad. But since I'm such a slow painter I have to start early.

 

THE MINIS

Let's introduce the heroes: A nameless monk by Metal Magic will play the role of St. Meinrad the hermit and two ravens by crocodile games will star as themselves (thanx for the tip, derek!).

 

post-3728-1231769230.jpg

 

FIRST PROBLEMS

How does one make a diorama base? Just use a larger base and glue everything on? A piece of wood? Rock? Cork? I've seen CDs used as bases, but that is a little too much, I'd like to keep it smaller. I guess it's time to browse through CMON and see what they use for diorama bases over there...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How does one make a diorama base? Just use a larger base and glue everything on? A piece of wood? Rock? Cork? I've seen CDs used as bases, but that is a little too much, I'd like to keep it smaller. I guess it's time to browse through CMON and see what they use for diorama bases over there...

 

My favorite things to use are pieces of wood. I have a bunch of pieces left over from my husband's bookshelf project and if those won't do the trick I check out my local hobby store and see what they have. You can glue everything on, but you might want to add some texture to the base with milliput or green stuff as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The real answer is "anything you set your mind to." ::P:

 

You could find a crazy piece of driftwood or a cool rock or do some crazy conversion of random crap in your house.

 

What you use for your diorama base depends on what you want your diorama to be. However, for starters some suggestions:

1. Wood plaque from Michael's or local craft store. If you go to the wood burning area, you'll probably find a lot of wooden plaques. They come in all different sizes (3" to 18") and shapes (rectangle, oval, circle, etc.)

 

2. Foam insulation. It's usually pink or blue, and you can get it in various thicknesses, usually 1" or 2". You should glue this to something more stable, like masonite or thin plywood. You can cut and sand this stuff into interesting shapes.

 

3. Some sort of epoxy putty or clay or something. This is stuff that you can mold into rocks and tree stumps, etc.

 

That should get you started.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tips. I'll have some time today to look around and get some more ideas, maybe visit a hobby store or two - because tomorrow it's "back to work" :angry:

 

BEWARE OF THE NEWB

It just ocurred to me - it's probably better to paint the figures first and build the base later, right? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BEWARE OF THE NEWB

It just ocurred to me - it's probably better to paint the figures first and build the base later, right?

 

Depends. Getting all the pieces and laying them out and designing with unpainted figures doesn't hurt...especially if you want to work in lighting effects, etc. May help with color selection, etc. You don't have to though.

 

However, you want to paint the figure separate from the base. The larger base will make it so you can't reach all the nooks and crannies. Depending on how your base goes together, you may want to do some basic painting on the base before you add figures as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be happy to chime in as you progress, Samedi!

 

The others have covered the basing pretty well. If these three are the only characters in the diorama, I would keep the main base fairly small--40mm should be good, IMHO. If you get much larger, you will really need to fill in the space with your basing materials. As a separate item, you can mount the base on a plinth, which is a piece of wood to give it more height. Many display pieces are done this way these days. I'd agree with Ren that you should paint the minis separate from the base just for ease of painting; that being said be sure and do all the prep work ahead of time. For example, if you plan to pin your minis to the base (which I recommend) it's better to drill the holes prior to putting down any paint. Otherwise, you run the risk of rubbing off the paint or chipping it off with a slip of the drill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, this Thread's not dead! It was just, uh, asleep! :blush:

 

RL has been using up much of my time lately and I don't want to complain - I've got a very exciting life right now - however, that means only little time for my project here. But I'll try to stay on track. Since I want to finish by the end of August fortunally that means I dont have to rush ::): .

 

LAYOUT, FIRST TRY

I've been advised to prep the minis only when I know where I'm going (good advice, I think, I'll follow it), so that means more planning. Actually it was Jabberwocky's post that led to the decision to keep it simple and just use a regular, if slightly larger, base and go from there. I mean - it's like first project and all, I'll get in trouble soon enough so I better not force it.

 

So I went out and bought a pack of overpriced round bases from The Company That Must Not Be Named (It's hard to get anything else around here ::(: ) and started experimenting. There are two sizes that look promising - 40mm (as Jabberwocky suggested) and the larger 60mm base. Of course it's hard to imagine how it looks with the minis on it so I took some pictures:

 

THE 40mm BASE

Arranging it all on a 40mm base is not easy, here's a first try:

post-3728-1235043036.jpg

 

Remembering I have three dimensions to work with I built a little riser for the Hermit - that's almost one Swiss Frank worth of money! :blink:. Of course the money could be replaced with cork, Rock or some other material. Maybe even Green Stuff?

post-3728-1235043194.jpg

 

Hmm, like it better than the first version, but the Ravens look really big compared to the monk ...

 

THE 60mm BASE

Let's try the other base!

post-3728-1235043370.jpg

 

Whoa, this is huge! A lot of space to fill with (shudder) Scenery :wacko: Hmm, there would bee room for a pond, but I think I'll try that at another time (like, way in the future). But moving my minis around there would be room for a rock or a tree. Still very scary, but not as scary as the pond...

post-3728-1235043572.jpg

 

SO WHAT DO I WANT ?

That's the question I have to answer before moving on. And I hope I can answer that in broad strokes:

 

The scene takes place in the mountains near Zurich (that probably means I need rocks and/or cork for the base as well as some higher ground in whatever way) in the woods (that's harder. On the large base I could just go and buy a ready-made tree, but how would I show a woodland scene on the small base?)

 

Now this is as far as I got. What size of base should I take? The large one, where I have to include so much scenery (which I am not too good at)? The smaller one with no room for a tree but still the need for a "woodland feel"? Suggestions? Ideas?

 

I hope you all can help me with this. And no - this thread is not dead. Just asleep - sometimes :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I, personally, love the idea of a sheet of cork...we have some cork shelf liner here that came in a roll form...it's about 1.5mm thick and is great for building rocky risers. You could pretty easily tear out a circle about the same size as the base (and I like the tightness of the 40mm base if you're not doing any major scenic elements), then build up two different elevations, one for the monk and one for the raven-tree. Glue the cork layers down and drill holes for pinning, then you're ready to prime!

 

Just because I mention it every time I talk about basing, pumice paste would make it real easy to add some smaller texture, like rubble or skree. It would also be a good way to put some texture on that monk's base (I'd say either that, or get out the nippers and the dremel to remove that base, since it's not a very natural texture).

 

You could also add oregano or some other kind of ground-cover vegetation once you've got everything painted. That would help sell the "mountain with trees" concept a little more.

 

Keep it coming! This'll be a fun project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh...just had a thought about the 60mm base...there'd be room on that for you to build up the entrance to a cave behind the hermit. That would take up a lot of "white space," plus integrate a background (giving the diorama a front and a back, if you like that). Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Sanael!

 

You really helped me with my decision to go for - the smaller base ::D:. The idea with the cave entrance sounds cool, but may be a bit too much for the beginning as I haven't based one mini yet. The cork sheet on the other hand - I'll definitely try that! With a side order of pumice paste I bought some time ago at my FNSLGS (my friendly not so local game shop, about 900 km away - I've yet to find a good one around here). I confess - Ive already tried to tackle the project on my own. But I didn't get very far... :blush:

Ok, so there isn't much of a diorama left. It's more like an extended base now. But I feel comfortable with that decision.

 

SOME QUESTIONS ABOUT CORK

Here in this forum and over at CMON I've seen a lot of minis with a base made of cork. It looks great. However, when I talked to the guy at my FNSLGS (mentioned above) he advised me strongly not to use it. He told me that cork shrinks over time which could end in cracking the paint and/or varnish. Has any of you experienced this? What do you do to prevent it? Which glue is best to glue cork on a plastic base and/or to more cork?

 

WHAT NEXT?

I have decided on a base and on my basic basing material. Now I have to find a place that a) is not too far away and b) will sell me some cork sheet. After that I'll start building some rock formations - and take more pictures!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What you're doing is great. I wouldn't take that guy's advice, since have never had cork problem and tons of great bases have it. To glue cork I use any old white glue, most recently Aleene's Tacky. Michaels slls both glue and cork. However, cork is the first step. Consider laying some fine sand over the cork. Looking forward to this scene. =D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, no real progress due to too much work :angry:

 

However, i managed to get some cork sheet (2,5 square meters actually, they dind't sell smaller quantities so I should be settled for life...) and made some experiments: I built a cork base for an old grenadier model and another using pumice paste for an equally ancient mini from the metal magic dunwich detective line (pictures will follow, when I find some time - probably in about two weeks or so).

 

After trying super glue first I found out that it's not really good for cork, so I followed your advice, demonelf3, and used some white glue (a brand called MIOCOLL). Yup, perfect, should have listened to you right away. :blush:

 

Mooseyjoe - thanks for the Idea with the pine bark. I'll definitely try that - maybe even on this project, if I find some that isn't sold in 20-litre-bags! <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds great, just be careful how you paint the cork, or the pumice paste if you're going to lay that over the cork (which I might suggest). If you do plain cork, it can be very obvious that it's cork, and if you coat it w/ pumice, use texture from an actual rock or even that bark mooseyjoe suggested, and washes. Can't wait to see some paint slapped on this one. =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...