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Sheer WIP/Tutorial Finished


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I layered up the raised cloth and the areas where the cloth pulls away from the skin with the Vallejo glaze to block in where the colors will be much darker. Some areas will be deliberately darker than sheer sheer so as to try to not violate Reaper's no nude miniatures without linkage only rule. I used this as a guide to layer in the midtone on the solid cloth sections and across the creases in the clothes. I also used a basecoat of RMS Twilight Blue to darken some of the shadow around the chest, breasts, stomach and legs. If you add too little color you can go back in and change it at any point, but if you do too much it is annoying and time consuming to correct. This is also a point where if you have rough spots from your prep of the miniature you will notice them and the roughage can throw off the effect. You can also correct any overage of skin fairly easy here. I made her left leg less visible from the front as it looked too "fat" when viewed from the front with a slight angle to the left.

 

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Those were the hard stages, now it gets much easier. Next is just adding in the shadows and highlights to the solid cloth and just a bit to the raised areas of sheer cloth.

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Yeesh... no matter how many times I look at those newest pictures, or watch the development sequence, I still have to consciously remind myself that it's a pewter miniature and those folds are not cloth. That is one heck of a cool effect, and it adds a ton of depth. Really nicely done so far.... more more more!! ;)

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I've layered in my shadows along the folds of the clothes with RMS Midnight Blue, then tweaked my basecoat and added some subtle highlights (my camera does not pick this up well) with a combo of RMS Snowshadow and Ghost White.

 

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This is all the highlighting I will be doing right now. At this point its also easy to mess up so I finish out the rest of the model and give it a quick dullcoat. This lets me see the model in its entirety before I finish up the highlights and gives me a layer of protection over the paintjob which makes correcting highlight errors easier.

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For those of us with little patience...

You state that you 'layered in' whatever. Earlier you mentioned how thin your paints were.

What is your ballpark number of layers?

 

I want to work with this technique, but I start going nutty around layer 12 when it still feels like I'm not doing a thing...

 

 

Thanks!

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For those of us with little patience...

You state that you 'layered in' whatever. Earlier you mentioned how thin your paints were.

What is your ballpark number of layers?

 

I want to work with this technique, but I start going nutty around layer 12 when it still feels like I'm not doing a thing...

 

 

Thanks!

 

I generally paint with paint the same consistency as the wash I showed earlier so ballpark maybe about 7-8 for the shadows, 5 or 6 for the highlights right now. Those will be getting more layers when I've finished the rest of the figure. After the basecoat the shadows and highlights are smaller areas for each layer so they take less time. Painting thin does require patience, but you will still see results fairly quickly even with the thin layers. Thicker layers means much faster transitions and more noticeable mistakes and makes it really easy to lose the sheer effect.

 

Maya~

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Thicker layers means much faster transitions and more noticeable mistakes and makes it really easy to lose the sheer effect.

Yeah...I learned that the hard way. My attempt at doing sheer didn't go that well...

 

Thanks for this WIP...makes me want to try again...

 

 

Sheer is one of those things you will never get right first try, like most miniature techniques. The key is practice. Try again!!!

 

 

Maya~

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A few important notes on sheer highlighting. You'll notice I have not taken highlights up extremely or to white. This is because transparent cloth acts differently than opaque or solid cloth. With opaque cloth light is reflected off the cloth where folds gather, but in transparent cloth, light goes through the fabric and is reflected where the cloth meets the skin, not where the folds are. What this means as a painter is that where you would normally highlight opaque cloth, IE where the cloth is closest to the light (top of folds) you do NOT highlight the same with sheer. Sheer is highlighted not as light as you would see in opaque cloth but the lightest highlight in sheer would be a light tint of the color you are using for the cloth. If you go up to a highlight of white or any color that you would normally do if the fabric was opaque you went up too far and it will look odd to the eye. You should never see pure white unless the sheer fabric is white. The light tint of the color you are using that will be the lightest highlight and should not be as bright or brighter than where the skin is. Sheer fabric (with the exception of satin sheer) is very dull to the eye and lacks "normal" highlights and normal reflectivity of fabrics. The lightly tinted color of the cloth over the skin is the lightest part or highlights of the cloth. When I was referring to highlighting earlier it was over the skin areas of the cloth. The midtone of the cloth is where the cloth is standing away from the skin and where the shadows are is where there is no skin contact at all and the fabric bunches together.

 

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Where you see a wrinkle in the sheer across the skin (like across the chest) the highlight is not white. Tt will be a midtone version of the sheer color because the wrinkle represents two pieces of fabric that are one behind the other and thus will be darker than the surrounding cloth.

 

 

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Google is your friend because sheer acts so differently than normal cloth and a reference is always good when you first learn to paint it.

 

Maya~

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I finished up the other elements of the model and took a second look at the sheer. I deepened a few of the shadows around the chest and stomach but the rest was good to go. So essentially the sheer is being pronounced done. I'm going to put this on my site (I'll post a link for those interested when I'm done) so it'll all be in one spot. Questions/Comments?

 

 

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Maya~

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